Tag Archives: caldwell

Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5

Standard
Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5
Please PLAY while you are viewing photos

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

Standard
Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

This is Dorothy (née Jamieson) and Warren Dunlop’s wedding in 1943 or 1944.I don’t have all the people identified, but from L-R back row looking at the picture:Minnie Dunlop, Teddy Jamieson, Unidentified, Marion (née Hamilton) Jamieson, Dorothy (née Jamieson) Dunlop, Jean Jamieson, unidentified, Eleanor Jamieson, Bella (née Thompson) Jamieson (the matriarch and all the Jamieson girls’ mother.Jake Caldwell thanks!

Nancy Jamieson — My aunt Dots wedding … so all my Jamieson aunts and my Granny Jamieson. And my mum is 4 in from the left – Marion nee Hamilton …

Doug Caldwell
Doug Caldwell

October 30, 2020 Carleton Pla

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

Standard
Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop  – Part 3

Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Family Reunion–The Gastro Pub– Carleton Place October 30 2021

Photo of the day–Found this amazing picture while digging through a box of stuff left by the previous owners… Fairly certain this is Bess Caldwell, circa 1900-1905, ripping around the lawn of Goth Manor on her goat cart. from Northern Gothic in Lanark https://www.instagram.com/northerngothic/ – read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans” –read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”
Miss Caldwell – Public Archives photo

Built in 1865 by the Caldwell family— (read more here More Tidbits About Lanark Village) and now known as “the Hielans,” this great house is a treasure of the Ottawa Valley, situated in the heart of the village of Lanark on the Clyde river”–read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Standard
The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jun 1899, Mon  •  Page 5

Read the Clipping above….

Where was the first Darou Bakery? Was it on Bell or Mill Street?

Second location

Photo from Doug Caldwell

So Doug showed me this photo on Saturday and said he had no idea where the second bakery was.. It didn’t take me long to figure it out.

Darou’s second bakery was in the Capital Optical building on Bridge Street which later became Woodcock’s Bakery. One of the senior Jamieson’s confirmed it with : Darou’s was in that building before Woodcocks!

Third location

On the corner of Emily and Bridge Street- read- What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1928, Fri  •  Page 9
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is relatedreading-3.jpg



Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Woodcocks Bakery

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery



This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 251080795_10158497991176886_7026546186636106033_n.jpg



The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Standard
The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

At the end of the Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion Doug Caldwell gave us all an Eastern White Pine to plant and wanted to see Carleton Place full of white pines. It’s also the provincial tree of Eastern Ontario. Something you did not know about Doug… He decided to take a forestry course as a young man and after he graduated he realized that it might not be the future for him, so he went into business.

Did you know that in colonial times, these tall trees were used to make masts for the British Royal Navy ships? Lumbering was the first industry in the Ottawa Valley where white pine trees were cut and sent down river to sawmills built along the Mississippi River at the village site. ( H Caldwell & Sons, Carleton Place, were prominent dealing in white pine planks)

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Standard
Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Did you know???

During the War of 1812, the Point Pelee people fought as British allies alongside Capt. William Caldwell, when they became known as “Caldwell’s Indians.” As a result, the British promised them formal title to their homelands.

The Caldwell First Nation served as allies of the British during the War of 1812. In consideration of this service, they were promised land at Point Pelee. The First Nation band continued to occupy Point Pelee, with the support of the Canadian government, up until the late 1850s. In the 1920s, many of the band members were forced out of Point Pelee when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police along with local law enforcement agencies burned the homes of band members in the area in an effort to force them from their traditional lands.

Before his marriage, while in Fort Niagara, William Caldwell had a relationship with a Mohawk woman. They named their mixed-race son, born about 1782, Billy Caldwell. The boy was first raised with his mother’s people. In 1783 Caldwell married Suzanne Baby, daughter of Jacques Baby dit Dupéron. Together they had eight children, five sons and three daughters. In 1789 his father brought his son Billy Caldwell into his family and gave him an education. Billy Caldwell later lived in the United States after 1818, where he became a prominent representative of the Potowatomi people in Illinois and Iowa. He was sometimes known to them as Sauganash, their term for a British Canadian. He died in 1822.

In 1977 the powers to be along with with Indian leaders from eight Southwestern Ontario bands to tried to solve a ticklish problem from out of the distant past. At issue were the somewhat meagre remains bones, pottery, lint knives and clay pipes of an almost unknown people who lived around Lake Erie hundreds of years before the first Europeans wandered by. Their graves are spread about this region, including one particular burial site east of Huron Church Road and the Third Concession in Windsor. This site, dated by its pottery at be tween 900 and 1,100 AD, lies where the city planned to build an E.C. Row Expressway doverleaf. From this shallow sand gravesite, more than 40 years ago, the skeletons of 27 individuals men, women and children and the few possessions they were buried with were removed by archeologists.

Since the late 1930s, however, the site has been used as a source of gravel and sand, possibly destroying its archeological value. But those ancient Indians helped to focus attention on a small yet widespread contemporary Indian band which for 140 years has tried vainly to claim Point Pelee and Pelee Island as its native homeland and whose chief now seeks to keep bulldozers and road graders from the burial site. The leader of the tiny Caldwell band, Carl Johnson, almost alone among his band members lived with his family in this area. And in a long-accepted provincial custom, the nearest Indian band to a disputed site argues the native cause. Johnson, from the town of Essex, whose band members numbered fewer than 80 scattered between Chicago and Toronto, gathered support from the eight nearest Indian bands in Southwestern Ontario. The chiefs, representing bands from Walpole Island to London, agreed to try to resolve the conflict between Caldwell demands that the site not be touched and the citys need to build the cloverleaf for the expressway.

The crumbling bones and crushed pottery fragments from the burial site are stored now in steel cabinets in the archives of Ottawas National Museum of Man. “These remains are part of Canadas heritage,” a museum spokesman said. They are inspected every year to check on their condition. You can say theyre lovingly cared for.” “They’re not the heritage of Canada, at all,” Chief Johnson said,

“Those people didnt know what Canada was. Canada would be nothing to them at that time”.

There are copies of documents that shows the band, under a Chief William Caldwell, began to demand their own land back in 1835. But historians, archeologists, and governments alike have suggested the Caldwell Band are misguided in thinking Point Pelce and Pelee Island are their ancestral lands. The problem of identity lies in the Caldwells name and the time it first appeared in region records.

The confusion arises front the fact there were three Caldwells, who appear to represent at least two different families, who dealt with Indians on the Upper Canada frontier. “Williapt Caldwell Sr., was an Irish-American colonist, a United Empire Loyalist, a man throughout his life actively involved with Indians in the Lake Erie-LakeOntario area. “The Indians he led in battle, principally Shawnee and Delaware, and may Have thought of him as chief. . . but they werent Point Pelee Indians.”

Clifton said Williams son, Billy, who became a noted if unsuccessful entrepreneur on the frontier, was dubbed a Potawatomi chief after his death in Chicago. But the Potawatomis did not cross into Canada until the third decade of the 19th century. A third Caldwell, John Sr was born about 1800, Clifton said, and, in documents in the mid-1800s, he is listed as chief of an Ojibway band in southern Ontario which was always referred to as “Caldwells Band” and which resided at Point Pelee but that was in the 1850s, far later than Chief Johnson says his people took the name Caldwell.

In 1976 a Mr. Johnson pointed to a copy of an 18th century map of the north shore of Lake Erie, which indicates a small but unnamed settlement at Point Pelee. “That’s us,” he said. “Thats where we were in the late 1700s.” Johnson said the chief of the Caldwell Indians at Point Pelee were not invited to take part in the great land purchases in 1790 by Alexander McKee. We werent invited, and yet our land was sold from under us. We claim that purchase was illegal.” Clifton and others say the reason no Caldwell chief was invited to that deal was because there wasnt a chief called Caldwell at that time.” And so the confusing argument continued wrapped into the added enigma of the unknown people whose grave awaits the discussions of other Indians at Windsor City Hall.

Update-

One of the few First Nations in Canada without a reserve changed that in 2020, marking a major milestone in the small community’s 230-year fight for a homeland.

The Caldwell First Nation, previously known as the Chippewas of Point Pelee, announced on Monday that it secured reserve status for an 80-hectare property on the band’s traditional territory in what is now Leamington, Ont. on the north shore of Lake Erie. Read the rest here– CLICK

Tribal Name: Caldwell First Nation

Band No. 165 Traditional Name: Alternate Names: Chippewas of Pelee, Point Pelee Indians, Pelee Island,  and Caldwell’s band of Indians. Related Tribes: The Chippewa (also called Ojibwa in Canada) are an Anishinaabe-speaking indigenous nation with people within the borders of present-day Canada and the United States. The Anishinaabe are the largest Native American/First Nation peoples north of Mexico, with nearly 78,000 people among various groups in Canada from western Quebec to British Columbia.

  • William Caldwell was portrayed in Walter D. Edmonds’ popular 1936 historical novel Drums Along the Mohawk.
  • In the 1939 movie by the same name, directed by John Ford, John Carradine portrayed Caldwell

The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1924, Sat  •  Page 29

Another Segment in the Short Life of Jessie Comrie– Residential Schools –1919

The Friendship Moccasins from the Lebret Residential School

Francis Shaw Pakenham Postmaster Gone Missing —Elizabeth Shaw — Residential School Teacher

Kamloops Industrial School– “A New Idea in Residential Schools” After the Fire 1925

What Do You Know About Walpole Island?

Walking Without Knowing the Amplifying Truth

How Many Women Does it Take to Replace a Team of Horses?The Doukhobors

others… about native lands etc..

Sadler Farm Part 2 Jaan Kolk Nancy Anderson and Lorraine Nephin

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Sadler Farm on Highway 44– Nancy Anderson

The Little Door by the River

The Natives of Carleton Place — Violins and Deer

Constable Frank Rose – Moonshine, Indians, Raids, Drunks and Dances –The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Captured by Natives Alice Garland

Beckwith Child Stolen by Natives

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

What Do You Know About Walpole Island?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

Standard
Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

Last week I wrote about Minnie Dunlop who used to run Darou’s Bakery on the corner of Emily and Bridge Street in Carleton Place. If you had no idea like I and some of the family did: Minnie not only baked her heart out, and ran that part of town like she was in charge, but she was also married to a former mayor from Carleton Place, Andrew Earl Dunlop.

Today, one of the family, Doug Caldwell called me and we had a lovely chat about the town of Carleton Place. He remembers the pool hall really wasn’t the place and Minnie often hauled her son Murray home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Oh the horrors! She was a no nonsense woman who believed in the theory that sliced bread was here to stay and purchased one of the first bread sliceing machines to stay ahead of the competition. Doug remembers her telling him to grab a stool and show Carleton Place how its done slicing the bread. He said he was pretty proud doing that job.

Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum- read-In Memory of Mike Moldowan — The Man Behind the Fries

But Doug not only helped Murray, he helped Mike Muldowan at the chip wagon and when he got there early in the morning Mike would give him a large pail of potatoes to peel. I asked him if he ate his weight in chips for payment. He said, “You know I would have, but I remember getting silver coins, Mike never paid in paper!”

His mother Edna Florence Caldwell, was a hairdresser on Bridge Street and his grandmother, Mrs. Jamieson played the organ at St. James Anglican Church, and his two aunts sang in the choir. He also remembers the horse stables in the back of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. The farmers came to church with their teams and sleighs and it was quite the sight as they parked. When they left they had to unharness everything and regroup, and mumbled and grumbled. But that was not the only place they mumbled in grumbled at St. Andrew’s. In the days that Captain Hooper’s house Raloo Cottage was going to be torn down the citizens of Carleton Place were not happy. Not happy at all! So I asked him,”Did they protest?” He said they protested the way they always did– complaining in front of the churches on Sunday!”

Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–Around 1950 the southeast corner of Lake Avenue and Moore Streets looked like this. Originally the site of W.A. Nichols’ Sons Lumber, it became W & S Building Supplies around 1948

He also remembers every year the gypsies–(2021 word Romani) and would set up shop on the corner of Lake and Beckwith near where Nichols Planing Mill was. He said it was quite the event as in those days the stream behind it was quite larger than it is today.

So they mumbled and grumbled about the Levine building across the street, and they muttered about the new Fleming Funeral Parlour opening up on Lake Ave West. Because, that’s the way things were done. His grandfather, Will Jaimeson was a CPR railroad man and he did the Ottawa Brockville run which was a very prestigious run in those days.

Doug remembers being put on top of one of the L carts and having his Grandfather perform a steam show so to speak. His grandfather would holler to start shovelling the coal really fast and once the steam would get up to speed it was a sight to see. So he ran the smaller wheels and then the bigger wheels to show his grandson how much power that Locomotive had. Meanwhile the coal man wasn’t too happy and he would tell young Doug that his grandfather was showing off just because he showed up.

This morning I had a ZOOM chat with Doug Caldwell, as the family reunion is coming up October 30, 2021 at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place. He told me about the continual arguments he used to have with ‘Jimmy Edwards’ at Edwards Grocery when he went to go pick up a ‘knob of tobacco’ for his uncle on the corner of Coleman and Franktown Road. He was allowed a treat so he wanted to make sure he got the most bang for his money. In those days Jimmy Edwards bagged the candy and they were all in small paper bags. At each purchase Doug would argue with Jimmy saying he was getting cheated as he was not getting a full handful. Doug at the age of 5 would argue up and down but it was always the same result. Jimmy Edwards held the upper hand with those paper bags full of candy. So Doug at age 5 would leave the store muttering, hauling his little wagon down the street on his way to deliver that ‘knob of tobacco’ to his uncle. One day that tobacco got the best of him and he chewed off the corner of that tobacco wanting to see what it tasted like. Well you and I probably have a good idea what it tasted like, and he said he felt like he was poisoned. Worse that that he had to tell his uncle how he lost the corner of that tobacco.

In the end everyone moved away after the war so the family could seek better fortunes, and on October 30th, 2021, the families are all reuniting once again at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place for a salute to the “Jamieson Daughters”. It’s time for the family to reunite, celebrate and time for the younger generations to know their history. Family reunions are the place where you remember where you came from.

Thanks Doug for the stories!!

Shane Wm EdwardsNever heard anyone call my grandfather “Jimmy”. But in a “Remember When” column in the Canadian by S.C. Ribe in the late 40s, I read a reference to a “Jimmy Edwards” who had taken pictures of some Doukhobours at the train station. Having a copy of that picture I finally made the connection. read-How Many Women Does it Take to Replace a Team of Horses?The Doukhobors

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

– photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum at the Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Reunion.

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Standard
Documenting  The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Photo of the day–Found this amazing picture while digging through a box of stuff left by the previous owners… Fairly certain this is Bess Caldwell, circa 1900-1905, ripping around the lawn of Goth Manor on her goat cart. from Northern Gothic in Lanark https://www.instagram.com/northerngothic/

Miss Caldwell

Built in 1865 by the Caldwell family— (read more here More Tidbits About Lanark Village) and now known as “the Hielans,” this great house is a treasure of the Ottawa Valley, situated in the heart of the village of Lanark on the Clyde river”.
Before- Lanrk & District Museum
“Highland Laddie”, also known as “Hielan’ Laddie”, is the name of a Scottish popular folk tune “If Thou’lt Play Me Fair Play”, but as with many old melodies various sets of words can be sung to it, of which Robert Burns’s poem “Highland Laddie” is probably the best known. “If Thou’lt Play Me Fair Play” has been reworked several times since Burns set down his words,


Snippets of HISTORY OF LANARK VILLAGE
COVERS AN 85 YEAR PERIOD

The Trials, Difficulties, Slow but Steady Progress and
Finally Success of the Hardy Pioneers Written
Especially for the “Courier” — Inter-
esting Sketches.

FIRST SCHOOL-HOUSE AND KIRK — THIS IS LANARK.


Written By Mr. C. M. Forbes.

Published in The Perth Courier, Dec. 15, 1905 through Feb. 9, 1906.
Transcribed for the LCGS website by Charles Dobie. read the rest here click-http://lcgsresourcelibrary.com/articles/A-LANARK.HTM
THE CALDWELL’S COME.
           In 1837 the lumbering industry throughout Canada passed into an era of unexampled prosperity. This attractive business condition marked the entrance into active life of the village the Caldwell family, who coming out from Lochwinnoch, Scotland, in the early twenties, had gone on with others to the Township of Lanark. But the strong armed young sons John, Alexander and Boyd had learned woodcraft and possessed the business acumen and foresight to penetrate its possibilities. They were more ambitious than could be gratified on the Lanark homestead. Alexander and Boyd formed a partnership in 1837 and for thirteen years together engaged in the export timber business. They acquired lands and when they dissolved partnership these were divided, Alexander retaining the Clyde lands, Boyd the Mississippi, and pursuing separately the fortunes of the timber trade. They moved into Lanark Village and until their death remained the central figures of that great lumbering industry which they carried on.
           Sandy, as Alexander was affectionately called, possessed in a marked degree the power of winning men. His promises and his threats were alike accepted irrevocably. If a man proved himself on a jam of logs and Sandy said he should have more per month than he engaged for then the man got the increase, or if big Mick Ryan, swinging, swaggering Mick, tearing down Hall’s Hill shouting in response to a query, “drunk again ?” “Yis, be gad, it’s not every day I kill a pig” — if Mick went home and ill-treated his wife and Sandy knew of it then there would be threats and executions. Poor Mick he feared nobody but Sandy ; one day when in response to a summons for help the latter went to remonstrate with the Irishman for his cruelty he found him sitting in the house busy with a saucer of tea. He never looked up but at the first word from Sandy, Mick threw the tea in his face, but for his impudence and other misdeeds found himself sprawling upon the floor. Sandy nearly broke his hand with the blow.

CaldwellsMill-644x401

W. C. Caldwells Aberndeen Mills, Lanark Ontario. Grist and carding mill. Photo: Ewan R. Caldwell Collection, Negative No. PA-135197. Public Archives of Canada. –Perth RememberedSandy Caldwell King of the River Boys
           But there were happier times than this settling of family disputes. Every person acquainted with the life and disposition of a “shantyman” knows that in his merry moments, when through with the season’s operations in bush or on “drive” he is wont to engage in diversion of an innocent nature. And also in the long winter evenings when the work of the day is done and the “lads” have all returned from the woods and are seated around the camboose. It has been an arduous day perhaps out in the “works”; from before dawn till twilight’s close the men have been faithfully attending to all the parts of making logs or timber, chopping, scoring, hewing, skidding, hauling, with a brief midday meal of bread and pork at the base of some tall monarch of the woods, then thankfully coming to camp at night the lads file in, take their turn at the wash basin and then red cheeked and hungry they get down to a good substantial meal of meat and bread and tea. The appetite of a shantyman is great and swift. He eats a lot and it doesn’t take him long. So when the meal is over there are axes to grind, peavies to tighten up, axe handles to make and everything to get ready for the morrow’s operations. After this is all carefully attended to the jubilant spirits of the “shantymen” find expression in songs and sports. And it was in these sports that the leader Sandy excelled. He was always ready for a trial of swayback, twist the broom, hop the barrel or any one of the many games of the woods. This was the winning side of his nature but he also possessed a keen appreciation of the practical side of affairs and was ready to note every detail of the business in which he engaged. Thus, on the “drive” season when a jam of logs or timber obstructed the stream no readier arm or knowing mind ventured out upon the mass of locked timbers. Quick to find the place where the pinch of a peevie would do most good, where the unloading of a log would relieve the pressure in the proper spot, he appeared to possess a genius for bringing order out of chaos by this speedy restoring the tranquil passing of the drive. Moreover in the estimating of a timber limit few men of his time knew better than Alexander Caldwell how much square timber or logs a given area would produce.
           The partnership of 1837 then, between these two brothers Alexander and Boyd Caldwell, was one destined to have only good results for they were both eminently qualified. Thus we see them for thirteen years actively engaged side by side until the importance of their interests led to an understanding that each could pursue his fortunes alone. This perhaps was a good thing for the young village because it now became the home of two aggressive lumbering concerns instead of one and these added to a number of other companies who did business on the Clyde or Mississippi gave Lanark that picturesque bearing and character which belongs to every prosperous lumber town. In those days Lanark Village was spread over as much area as at the present time.

IMPETUS OF THE FIFTIES.
           The growth of the village so far as steady population and the erection of houses are concerned was slow until the fifties. Then an impetus seemed to be given progress and we find the Caldwell store and residence among the substantial structures that came into form at that time. This building is one of the best pieces of masonry in the place and indeed we know of no walls built here since that excel these in point of workmanship.
           It was also in this decade that the Congregational church of Lanark came into existence.
           A simple incident brought this about. Certain preachers at Middleville had been holding strong attractive meetings and a few of the elders and members of the Presbyterian church had gone to hear them which brought upon the offending churchmen the displeasure of the meenister. This precipitated a church quarrel which ended in 60 families seceding from the Presbyterian Church owing to what they called arbitrary treatment and setting up a branch of the Congregational Church. This was about 1848 although the congregation was not formally organized till 1852. Two years later an offshoot found good soil in Lanark Village when a congregation was organized here and in 1856 a church built and opened. This was the building partially destroyed by fire in 1900 and torn down to make room for the splendid new church in 1903 with Rev. D.C. McIntosh, pastor.
The rolling nature of the country upon which Lanark is built has given prominence in name to some of the more conspicuous peaks and stretches inside the corporation. Thus we speak of the French Hill, Legary’s Hill, the 50 acres, in the same manner as Glasgow people speak of similar peculiarities in the topography of their city. The bend of the High Street was the Bell o’ the Brae, where according to ancient tradition Wallace won his strategic victory over Bishop Beck of Durham and the English garrison of the Castle. Balamany Brae was another historical incline and Glasgow Green at the foot of the Saltmarket was a fashionable promenade down to the end of the eighteenth century. At that date John Mayne could write :
Whae’er has daunered oot at een
And seen the sights that I hae seen
For strappin lassies tight and clean
          May proudly tell
That, seach the country, Glasgow Green
          Will bear the bell.
           I have often thought of dear old Glasgow Green when on a Sunday afternoon perchance I roamed over Lanark’s 50 acres. It is true that the 50 acres will ill compare in point of size or historic association with the famous green, nearby the Court House where in July, 1865, the last public execution took place. It was that of Dr. Pritchard, the Sauchiehall Street poisoner whose mortal agony was watched by some thirty thousand persons. But our 50 acres is a considerable stretch of green and here in the summer time Lanark lads and lassies are wont to stray even as they do in the Old Country and moreover where Ned Belton and a certain cobbler along with a number of cronies held full many a sweet and savory “bouillon.” Our own poet John Moran has immortalized this feature of the 50 acres in his clever verses on the “Stolen Gobbler.”
           One who is at all acquainted with the history of Lanark cannot mention “French Hill” without recalling memories of a pleasant old Frenchman who once lived there. Whence he came I know not nor do I care to enquire, for the people who knew him always speak so reverently and affectionately of “Old Tut Millotte” that I fain would believe he spent all his days in Lanark. Everybody knew him and none had an ill word to say. Fortune had not been kind to Tut even when we consider a lack of making the best of opportunities. But though the fickle dame frowned and despotically refused to accord the beaming old fellow any roseate chance yet he never showed discouragement.

           He had a position with the Caldwell firm when that company were in the heyday of their lumbering. Cooper by trade, it was his duty to make barrels in which to pack pork. This he did in the summer time and cut up and packed the pork in the fall. His workshop situated on George Street at the base of the hill between the Era office and Nelson Affleck‘s blacksmith shop contained all the equipment necessary for the business. In one end stood a pair of scales of the old pattern, large board squares supported by chains from a balance beam of iron. A huge cutting block and a ponderous cleaver such as some Gargantua might use, a sharp knife, a huge fork, a pot of lamp black and a brush with which he marked B.C. & Son on the carcass completed the outfit. He also wore while in this inspecting house a special suit which bore thickly spread evidences of his calling for the grease accumulations of years deepened until it was reckoned by inches. Pork for Millotte‘s inspection was usually sold at the Caldwell office or store before submitting for inspection and almost invariably Millotte received it with the remark “No meestake, fine pig for Boyd’s Willie.” This perhaps was not intended as a word in praise of the pork so much as it served to please the seller, and brought the reward of a glass of malt at Dobbie‘s tavern, and when night came he was pleased to boast, “No meestake, twenty one horn of malt and all right yet,” accompanying this statement with a slap of the right hand upon his open mouth which produced a sharp sound indicating all was right below. Dear old Millotte ! Your bronzed features and fringe of snow-white hair, your imperturbable disposition has set many a one thinking.
The death of Alexander Caldwell in the sixties and Boyd in 1868 passed the control of the family interests on to a younger generation. The late W.C. Caldwell, M.P.P., took up the business which had been established and vigorously prosecuted, with success by his father; T.B. Caldwell and William Caldwell succeeded to the holdings which had made the name of Boyd Caldwell and Son prominent among Canada’s foremost commercial firms. The old school dropped into history and Lanark’s business circles were now formed of younger men who by their energy, push and enterprise have shed fresh lustre upon the family name. Early in life W.C. Caldwell became identified with the political life of the province and for upwards of thirty years stood as the leader of the Liberal party in the North Riding of Lanark. He engaged in numerous political campaigns and invariably won the admiration and respect of those with whom he came in contact even when they found their views diametrically opposed to his. His manly bearing and straightforward manner were of the kind one might expect in a son of a worthy sire. Lanark mourned when her honored son was laid low, for his achievements in public life had brought enoniums not only upon himself but also the village of his birth. One of the more important election contests in which he invited public opinion was that of 1879 when he defeated Dr. Mostyn by the majority of 282 votes. When the news was announced after the returns were counted up, wild enthusiasm prevailed. A procession was formed and marched out to meet the conquering hero who had spent that day in Almonte and was returning home in the evening. Ardent supporters manufactured a banner out of colored cloth and upon it the number 282 flamed. With this emblem of victory waving proudly in the breeze, the long line of men entered the village and shouts of acclaim greeted the man who won the day. A banquet held in Baird‘s brick block the same evening has never been surpassed in point of excellence. Political fervor also ran high and speeches made which are remembered down to the present day.
           Mr. William Caldwell moved to Toronto a few years ago and his removal left Mr. T.B. Caldwell the sole representative and proprietor of the Boyd Caldwell interests which included the Clyde Woollen Mills, timber limits, iron mines, and the large Lanark store. T.B. Caldwell is now North Lanark’s representative in the Federal Parliament. Since the death of his father the expansion has ever been reflective of that careful business administration combined with aggressive enterprise which have always characterized the name.

Bytown Paranormal
August 9, 2020  · 

Visiting Northern Gothic today and came across this beautiful old church on a hill in Lanark, Ontario.
118 MILL STREET, Lanark Highlands, Ontario K0G1K0
For Sale

Description for 118 MILL STREET
Waterfront Victorian Home on 5.4 Acres! Perched atop a hill overlooking the Clyde River & Lanark Village, youll find this masterpiece from the mid 19th century. Just 15 mins from Perth! 600ft of waterfront. Example of excellent 1800s craftsmanship, w/ 11 ceilings throughout, fireplaces in every rm on the main lvl, & a wrap-around porch. On the main lvl youll find a grand staircase, & huge family rm to your left adjoining the formal dining rm. On the right youll find an opulent parlour w/ wall-to-wall bookshelf harbouring a secret passageway! Upstairs youll notice grand arching doors w/ stained glass leading to a separate suite w/ full bthrm, bdrm, & extra set of stairs. On the other side there are 3 lg bdrms & 3 full bthrms; 2 were recently remodeled. A separate 2 storey outbuilding offers a workshop wired w/ its own 200 amp service, loft & 2 car garage. Backing onto golf course for optimal privacy. Come experience the rich history of this one-of-a-kind estate! 24hrs irrevocable. (id:1937)

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

Caldwell 1959 Tom Page and a few other photos

Standard
Caldwell 1959 Tom Page and a few other photos

Thanks to Tom Page Caldwell 1959

Bri DickieI am with Donna ^ – heartbroken. Having had Mrs. Menzies as the teacher that inspired me to become one, I have always had a respect for their remarkable relationship. They were so kind to so many. Having roofed their house a few times, I experienced their hospitality and kindness repeatedly. I think we all loved their desire to help “the old folks” even when they were in advanced years themselves:) He sure cut a pretty suave picture when he and Mrs. Menzies cruised around town in their Jaguar.

Donna Lowe WardBri Dickie lovely words. I was lucky enough to have Marion Menzies as my Grade 3 teacher and then when I began my teaching career at Caldwell I was her Grade 1 teaching partner. She took me under her wing and she and Bob treated Lee and I like family. Such a special couple.

Norma Ford
February 8, 2016  · 

The picture below is from 1951 taken on the front steps at Calgary Church School on Victoria Street when it housed a couple of grades before Caldwell Street School was built. Can anybody fill in the ? for me.
Left to Right – 1st row – Teacher – Dorothy Craig-Reid, Sandra Donnelly, Sharon Irwin, ?, Diane Hamilton, Arlene Hurdis, ?, Janet Hurdis, Norma Drummond, Norma Clark.
Left to Right – 2nd row – Gail Buffam, Janice Hale, Lorna Hurdis, Janet Switzer, Peggy Cole, Shirley Williams, Norma Dorman, ?, Eddy Lackey.
Left to Right – 3rd row – Jack Shail, ?, Delmer Waugh, Bobby Scott, David Hamilton, ?, Peter Wilson, Gary Eastman, Terry Julian.
Left to Right – 4th row – Bobby Stanzel, David McGee, ?, Danny Desrosiers, Richard Mason.
Caldwell Gr 7 Mrs Duncan — Caldwell Street School, Carleton Place.
and then they went to Carleton Place High School…. 1970-71

Doreen VaillancourtBrl Jamie Bridge, randy Amiotte ? John Armour Terry Preisto ? Steve ?, Doug Porteous, Tim Neil, Bill Featherstone, ?Mrl Me Doreen Mahoney, Heather White, Sherri Reynolds, Julie deschamp, Terry Illingsworth, Lee ann Brisco, ? Lynch, Jeff Drummond, ? Russell, ?Frl Janet Tuttle, ?, ?Hastie, Barb RIntol, Peggy McDermid, Diane Lowe, Susan Morris, ? Morrison

Caldwell 1971-1972
Caldwell 1971-1972

Caldwell Public School Evan Greenman Ted LeMaistre – Thanks to Pete Brunelle

Standard
Caldwell Public School Evan Greenman Ted LeMaistre – Thanks to Pete Brunelle

Thanks to Pete Brunelle for sending this.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Oct 1997, Wed  •  Page 43

Education at our school has just suffered a grievous blow. It has little to do with Bill 160, although that may have been a factor. One of our best teachers has retired. It is true that Ted has seen younger days. His hair is white and it has been for as long as I have known him. He has seemed tired lately. Yet, without him, our school is diminished.

We will miss the compassionate way he dealt with students, the high quality of his programs, his strong sense of values that came forth in every lesson he taught. We will also miss his quick wit, his broad range of experience, which he shared with us when we weren’t sure how to deal with particular situations, his wisdom and his involvement in extra-curricular activities.

We will miss his friendship and sympathy when we were in difficulty and his practical jokes, which livened up our days and gave us a laugh when we needed it. We will miss his dedication to his job and the example he set of what a professional teacher should be.

Yes, he will be replaced by a young teacher with boundless energy and enthusiasm. This teacher has all the qualities of a good teacher but it will take years of experience before he can contribute to the children and to the life of the school the way Ted did. Ted’s skills are complete and have been for quite a while. A young teacher’s skills need to mature over time. Every school has and needs teachers like Ted. No school can get along without them. Before people become too enthusiastic about replacing all of our old teachers with young ones, think about it.

Evan Greenman, teacher, Carleton Place

 -
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Feb 1974, Thu  •  Page 2
 -
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Aug 1964, Fri  •  Page 3
 -
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Aug 1964, Fri  •  Page 3

Memories of Madeline Moir – Pinecraft Proberts and John Dunn 1978

More Photos of Caldwell School –Llew Lloyd

The 1977 Pow Wow Caldwell School

Caldwell School– 1971-1972– Words of Wisdom from Bob White

Caldwell School Talent Show 1964

Caldwell School 1990 Relay Team

Believe it or Not! Tales from Caldwell Elementary School

Lobster John and Arnold the Pig in Carleton Place