Tag Archives: caldwell

Missanoga Rock? Bon Echo Rock? Mazinaw Rock?–THE CANOE TRIPS TO THE ROCK 1895 and Ontario’s Answer to the Overlook Hotel

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Missanoga Rock? Bon Echo Rock? Mazinaw Rock?–THE CANOE TRIPS TO THE ROCK 1895 and Ontario’s Answer to the Overlook Hotel

CLIPPED FROM
Owen Sound Sun
Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1917, Fri  •  Page 11

I wrote an interesting story about a Lanark Cave a few months ago Mystery of the Lanark Cave — Lanark Village and this week I came across stories of a cliff rock with Indigenious markings called Missanoga Rock and could not find much about it– so I started to dig more.

CLIPPED FROM
The Menasha Record
Menasha, Wisconsin
28 Feb 1920, Sat  •  Page 4

It seemed it was called Missanoga Rock, Bon Echo Rock was Mazinaw Rock. Even in the history of the rock called the Gilbraltar of Canada there was mention of it being called Missanoga Rock. But it was, and even the Bon Echo Lodge called it that. In my confusion I had no idea as I had already written about the Mazinaw Rock–read Where Was Meyers Cave?

CLIPPED FROM
The Washington Post
Washington, District of Columbia
10 Jun 1910, Fri  •  Page 14

The history goes that Missanoga Rock/Mazinaw Rock rises 330 feet from the placid surface of Ontario’s Lake Mazinaw. This majestic rock has lured travelers for centuries, beginning with the Algonquin Indians who, on this rock, documented pieces of their lives, some hundreds of years ago. So we know In total, the Algonquins painted over 260 pictographs on this rock, using red ochre, a natural mineral, mixed with animal oil–creating the largest collection of its kind, in Southern Ontario. Mazinaw comes from “Mazinaabikinigan-zaaga’igan,” meaning “painted-image lake” in Algonquian– and I fear we will never know why it was called Missanoga.

In 1880, 1892, and 1895 a few local private journeys were made to Missanoga Rock. In those days it was so renowned and any journey was documented in the local newspapers. The gentlemen on one exhursion in 1892 were not believed, and the newspaper reported the local gossip that “they probably only made it as far as Innisville and camped out in the Innisville Hotel.”

1892 Carleton Place


CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Sep 1892, Tue  •  Page 8
CLIPPED FROM
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Oct 1895, Wed  •  Page 1

Sept 11,1895- Party of Caldwell and Drummond

THE CANOE TRIP TO MISSANOGA

Part 1- Sept 11 1895

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
11 Sep 1895, Wed  •  Page 3

18 Sep 1895Part 2

Meyer’s Cave is mentioned here and the search for gold-Where Was Meyers Cave? and Meyer’s Cave — John Walden Meyers

CLIPPED FROMThe Lanark EraLanark, Ontario, Canada18 Sep 1895, Wed  •  Page 2

September 25,1895Part 3 They reach the rock–

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
25 Sep 1895, Wed  •  Page 2

Was this the Joe Baye he was talking about? Joe Baye — Donna Sweeney Lowry

There is also a massive fading tribute to Walt Whitman etched into the rock.

CLIPPED FROM
The Edmond Sun
Edmond, Oklahoma
30 Oct 1919, Thu  •  Pag
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Mon, Aug 18, 1919 · Page 6

Bon Echo Inn

 Flora MacDonald Denison, an Ontario-based inn owner called The Bon Echo Inn had her favorite poet’s words etched forever into a granite cliff. Mac-Donald-Denison decided to model her quiet piece of paradise after the spiritual humanism and democratic idealism of her poet hero, Walt Whitman. She started The Whitman Club at the inn and a small number of people in the Canadian arts world began to see Mazinaw Lake as a retreat.

In the sultry summers of the 1920s, however, bohemian holidayers from Toronto, controversial young artists like Arthur Lismer and A.Y. Jackson, emerging authors, influential journalists having frolicked for some days or weeks in a rustic idyll beneath the great Mazinaw Rock at Bon Echo would converge on what was then Tweed’s Orange Hall to stage one of Merrill Denison’s “rollicking” entertainments.

It took a full day to make the 55-kilometre trip from Bon Echo. The amateur thespians would squeeze into Denison’s McLaughlin Buick for the bone-bruising drive along a dirt road (now Highway 41) to Kaladar where they’d catch a train to Tweed. The merrymakers would mount a quick rehearsal in the Orange Hall auditorium before bedding down in a local hotel.

There are old CBC radio Interviews with Merrill Denison speaking about the bygone days of the Bon Echo Inn and about the curious mysticism that surrounded the place (there are references to seances and ghosts etc) . When I saw clippings of the register I realized that these guests were the very best of the Canadian arts society. I think occultism was much more a part of the mainstream arts culture back then. It kept reminding me of the Overlook Hotel in The Shining…read-The Devil’s Telephone? The Ouija Board or Strange Stories from the Past

Denison was already a successful Toronto business woman when she took over ownership of the Bon Echo Inn in 1910. An early feminist Denison had started the Canadian Suffrage Association with a number of like-minded female activists, and was also a staunch proponent of the arts, especially writing. When she and her husband took over the Bon Echo Inn, she turned it into a haven for artists and thinkers, a quiet place in the Ontario wilderness where they could work and relax. Read more here click

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Aug 1918, Wed  •  Page 5

CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1926, Wed  •  Page 3


CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
23 Jul 1925, Thu  •  Page 1


CLIPPED FROM
The Weekly British Whig
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
30 Jul 1925, Thu  •  Page 7–Ruth Scripture moved to England from Toronto and died in 1935 in the UK

CLIPPED FROM
The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
14 Sep 1936, Mon  •  Page 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
14 Jul 1926, Wed  •  Page 3

Mystery of the Lanark Cave — Lanark Village

Where Was Meyers Cave?

Meyer’s Cave — John Walden Meyers

THE CAVE AT POOLEY’S BRIDGE STORY

Historical Caves — Pelissier’s Caves

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

So Where Were the Caves in Carleton Place?

Now You see it, Now You Don’t: The Disappearing and Reappearing of the Tim Horton’s Subterranean

The Caldwell Family Lanark Era 1910

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The Caldwell Family Lanark Era 1910

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 Nov 1910, Wed  •  Page 4

The Clachan – William Smith– The Buchanan Scrapbook

Memories of Brightside- The Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Alexander Clyde Caldwell Family Part 1

Hielans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

Dalhousie Lake in Photos –Caldwell Family Summer Vacations

Alexander Clyde Caldwell Photos— Thanks to Chris Allen

Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part1

Did you Know About the Caldwell FirstNation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — DougCaldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have inCommon?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“TheHielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

High Steppers Dance 1900

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High Steppers Dance 1900

Photo from Jaimeson/ Caldwell–Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5

 High steppers were considered a contemporary precision dance and drill troupe – performing dance steps, military drill maneuvers, marching steps and choreographed street dance to percussion accompaniment. I could not find anything pertaining these high steppers from Carleton Place but I did find this mention of ‘steppers’ in the Lanark Era.

The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
02 Apr 1919, Wed  •  Page 1

Never Miss a Chance to Dance!

No one in this world wanted to take over tap dancer Ann Miller’s job more than I did. After 70 long years of random attempts, all that remains is a pair of silver tap shoes tucked away in a cupboard long forgotten. I used to wear them on a day to day basis for many years as I always believed one should be on call if someone had the odd tap dancing job. In life I have always winged it: life, eyeliner, just everything.

As a child my mother told my father that I had natural rhythm and would probably belong to a professional dance troupe. Actually, what she really wanted me to be was one of the dancers on American Bandstand, but I had other goals in mind. When I was eight I wanted to fluff out my tutu and be the Sugar Plum Fairy so badly that I accidentally bumped the reigning fairy off the stage during practice. Seeing the stage was a foot off the ground, she was luckily not hurt, and I was to remain a Waltzing Flower forever.

At 17 I had my first “break”. I became one of the regular “crowd” dancers on a Montreal based TV show called “Like Young”. Every Saturday afternoon I lined up outside CFCF-TV sporting my grandmother’s orthopedic brown lace up shoes, ready to dance. Those borrowed shoes were just super for dancing and they looked fabulous with my floor dusting Le Chateau gabardine pants. I was nothing but double-trouble on the dance floor. Read the rest here..

Cruisin Through the Dance Halls- From Carleton Place and Beyond!! Larry Clark

More on Grandma Majaury — Mother Bread Maker Midwife and Step Dancer

Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5

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Remember When? Jamiesons — Now and Then-Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 5
Please PLAY while you are viewing photos

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

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Vintage Photos of the Gals — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 4

This is Dorothy (née Jamieson) and Warren Dunlop’s wedding in 1943 or 1944.I don’t have all the people identified, but from L-R back row looking at the picture:Minnie Dunlop, Teddy Jamieson, Unidentified, Marion (née Hamilton) Jamieson, Dorothy (née Jamieson) Dunlop, Jean Jamieson, unidentified, Eleanor Jamieson, Bella (née Thompson) Jamieson (the matriarch and all the Jamieson girls’ mother.Jake Caldwell thanks!

Nancy Jamieson — My aunt Dots wedding … so all my Jamieson aunts and my Granny Jamieson. And my mum is 4 in from the left – Marion nee Hamilton …

Doug Caldwell
Doug Caldwell

October 30, 2020 Carleton Pla

Heilans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Hielans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop – Part 3

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Hielans Lanark Caldwell Reunion 1899 — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop  – Part 3

Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Family Reunion–The Gastro Pub– Carleton Place October 30 2021

Photo of the day–Found this amazing picture while digging through a box of stuff left by the previous owners… Fairly certain this is Bess Caldwell, circa 1900-1905, ripping around the lawn of Goth Manor on her goat cart. from Northern Gothic in Lanark https://www.instagram.com/northerngothic/ – read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans” –read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”
Miss Caldwell – Public Archives photo

Built in 1865 by the Caldwell family— (read more here More Tidbits About Lanark Village) and now known as “the Hielans,” this great house is a treasure of the Ottawa Valley, situated in the heart of the village of Lanark on the Clyde river”–read-Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Documenting The Lanark Village Caldwell Home –“The Hielans”

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Revolutions of Death at Caldwell & Son’s

Sandy Caldwell King of the River Boys

More Tidbits About Lanark Village

The Tale of the Transplanted Higlanders

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

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The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jun 1899, Mon  •  Page 5

Read the Clipping above….

Where was the first Darou Bakery? Was it on Bell or Mill Street?

Second location

Photo from Doug Caldwell

So Doug showed me this photo on Saturday and said he had no idea where the second bakery was.. It didn’t take me long to figure it out.

Darou’s second bakery was in the Capital Optical building on Bridge Street which later became Woodcock’s Bakery. One of the senior Jamieson’s confirmed it with : Darou’s was in that building before Woodcocks!

Third location

On the corner of Emily and Bridge Street- read- What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1928, Fri  •  Page 9
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

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Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Woodcocks Bakery

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery



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The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

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The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

At the end of the Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion Doug Caldwell gave us all an Eastern White Pine to plant and wanted to see Carleton Place full of white pines. It’s also the provincial tree of Eastern Ontario. Something you did not know about Doug… He decided to take a forestry course as a young man and after he graduated he realized that it might not be the future for him, so he went into business.

Did you know that in colonial times, these tall trees were used to make masts for the British Royal Navy ships? Lumbering was the first industry in the Ottawa Valley where white pine trees were cut and sent down river to sawmills built along the Mississippi River at the village site. ( H Caldwell & Sons, Carleton Place, were prominent dealing in white pine planks)

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

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Did you Know About the Caldwell First Nation?

Did you know???

During the War of 1812, the Point Pelee people fought as British allies alongside Capt. William Caldwell, when they became known as “Caldwell’s Indians.” As a result, the British promised them formal title to their homelands.

The Caldwell First Nation served as allies of the British during the War of 1812. In consideration of this service, they were promised land at Point Pelee. The First Nation band continued to occupy Point Pelee, with the support of the Canadian government, up until the late 1850s. In the 1920s, many of the band members were forced out of Point Pelee when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police along with local law enforcement agencies burned the homes of band members in the area in an effort to force them from their traditional lands.

Before his marriage, while in Fort Niagara, William Caldwell had a relationship with a Mohawk woman. They named their mixed-race son, born about 1782, Billy Caldwell. The boy was first raised with his mother’s people. In 1783 Caldwell married Suzanne Baby, daughter of Jacques Baby dit Dupéron. Together they had eight children, five sons and three daughters. In 1789 his father brought his son Billy Caldwell into his family and gave him an education. Billy Caldwell later lived in the United States after 1818, where he became a prominent representative of the Potowatomi people in Illinois and Iowa. He was sometimes known to them as Sauganash, their term for a British Canadian. He died in 1822.

In 1977 the powers to be along with with Indian leaders from eight Southwestern Ontario bands to tried to solve a ticklish problem from out of the distant past. At issue were the somewhat meagre remains bones, pottery, lint knives and clay pipes of an almost unknown people who lived around Lake Erie hundreds of years before the first Europeans wandered by. Their graves are spread about this region, including one particular burial site east of Huron Church Road and the Third Concession in Windsor. This site, dated by its pottery at be tween 900 and 1,100 AD, lies where the city planned to build an E.C. Row Expressway doverleaf. From this shallow sand gravesite, more than 40 years ago, the skeletons of 27 individuals men, women and children and the few possessions they were buried with were removed by archeologists.

Since the late 1930s, however, the site has been used as a source of gravel and sand, possibly destroying its archeological value. But those ancient Indians helped to focus attention on a small yet widespread contemporary Indian band which for 140 years has tried vainly to claim Point Pelee and Pelee Island as its native homeland and whose chief now seeks to keep bulldozers and road graders from the burial site. The leader of the tiny Caldwell band, Carl Johnson, almost alone among his band members lived with his family in this area. And in a long-accepted provincial custom, the nearest Indian band to a disputed site argues the native cause. Johnson, from the town of Essex, whose band members numbered fewer than 80 scattered between Chicago and Toronto, gathered support from the eight nearest Indian bands in Southwestern Ontario. The chiefs, representing bands from Walpole Island to London, agreed to try to resolve the conflict between Caldwell demands that the site not be touched and the citys need to build the cloverleaf for the expressway.

The crumbling bones and crushed pottery fragments from the burial site are stored now in steel cabinets in the archives of Ottawas National Museum of Man. “These remains are part of Canadas heritage,” a museum spokesman said. They are inspected every year to check on their condition. You can say theyre lovingly cared for.” “They’re not the heritage of Canada, at all,” Chief Johnson said,

“Those people didnt know what Canada was. Canada would be nothing to them at that time”.

There are copies of documents that shows the band, under a Chief William Caldwell, began to demand their own land back in 1835. But historians, archeologists, and governments alike have suggested the Caldwell Band are misguided in thinking Point Pelce and Pelee Island are their ancestral lands. The problem of identity lies in the Caldwells name and the time it first appeared in region records.

The confusion arises front the fact there were three Caldwells, who appear to represent at least two different families, who dealt with Indians on the Upper Canada frontier. “Williapt Caldwell Sr., was an Irish-American colonist, a United Empire Loyalist, a man throughout his life actively involved with Indians in the Lake Erie-LakeOntario area. “The Indians he led in battle, principally Shawnee and Delaware, and may Have thought of him as chief. . . but they werent Point Pelee Indians.”

Clifton said Williams son, Billy, who became a noted if unsuccessful entrepreneur on the frontier, was dubbed a Potawatomi chief after his death in Chicago. But the Potawatomis did not cross into Canada until the third decade of the 19th century. A third Caldwell, John Sr was born about 1800, Clifton said, and, in documents in the mid-1800s, he is listed as chief of an Ojibway band in southern Ontario which was always referred to as “Caldwells Band” and which resided at Point Pelee but that was in the 1850s, far later than Chief Johnson says his people took the name Caldwell.

In 1976 a Mr. Johnson pointed to a copy of an 18th century map of the north shore of Lake Erie, which indicates a small but unnamed settlement at Point Pelee. “That’s us,” he said. “Thats where we were in the late 1700s.” Johnson said the chief of the Caldwell Indians at Point Pelee were not invited to take part in the great land purchases in 1790 by Alexander McKee. We werent invited, and yet our land was sold from under us. We claim that purchase was illegal.” Clifton and others say the reason no Caldwell chief was invited to that deal was because there wasnt a chief called Caldwell at that time.” And so the confusing argument continued wrapped into the added enigma of the unknown people whose grave awaits the discussions of other Indians at Windsor City Hall.

Update-

One of the few First Nations in Canada without a reserve changed that in 2020, marking a major milestone in the small community’s 230-year fight for a homeland.

The Caldwell First Nation, previously known as the Chippewas of Point Pelee, announced on Monday that it secured reserve status for an 80-hectare property on the band’s traditional territory in what is now Leamington, Ont. on the north shore of Lake Erie. Read the rest here– CLICK

Tribal Name: Caldwell First Nation

Band No. 165 Traditional Name: Alternate Names: Chippewas of Pelee, Point Pelee Indians, Pelee Island,  and Caldwell’s band of Indians. Related Tribes: The Chippewa (also called Ojibwa in Canada) are an Anishinaabe-speaking indigenous nation with people within the borders of present-day Canada and the United States. The Anishinaabe are the largest Native American/First Nation peoples north of Mexico, with nearly 78,000 people among various groups in Canada from western Quebec to British Columbia.

  • William Caldwell was portrayed in Walter D. Edmonds’ popular 1936 historical novel Drums Along the Mohawk.
  • In the 1939 movie by the same name, directed by John Ford, John Carradine portrayed Caldwell

The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
21 Jun 1924, Sat  •  Page 29

Another Segment in the Short Life of Jessie Comrie– Residential Schools –1919

The Friendship Moccasins from the Lebret Residential School

Francis Shaw Pakenham Postmaster Gone Missing —Elizabeth Shaw — Residential School Teacher

Kamloops Industrial School– “A New Idea in Residential Schools” After the Fire 1925

What Do You Know About Walpole Island?

Walking Without Knowing the Amplifying Truth

How Many Women Does it Take to Replace a Team of Horses?The Doukhobors

others… about native lands etc..

Sadler Farm Part 2 Jaan Kolk Nancy Anderson and Lorraine Nephin

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Sadler Farm on Highway 44– Nancy Anderson

The Little Door by the River

The Natives of Carleton Place — Violins and Deer

Constable Frank Rose – Moonshine, Indians, Raids, Drunks and Dances –The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Captured by Natives Alice Garland

Beckwith Child Stolen by Natives

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

What Do You Know About Walpole Island?

Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

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Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

Last week I wrote about Minnie Dunlop who used to run Darou’s Bakery on the corner of Emily and Bridge Street in Carleton Place. If you had no idea like I and some of the family did: Minnie not only baked her heart out, and ran that part of town like she was in charge, but she was also married to a former mayor from Carleton Place, Andrew Earl Dunlop.

Today, one of the family, Doug Caldwell called me and we had a lovely chat about the town of Carleton Place. He remembers the pool hall really wasn’t the place and Minnie often hauled her son Murray home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Oh the horrors! She was a no nonsense woman who believed in the theory that sliced bread was here to stay and purchased one of the first bread sliceing machines to stay ahead of the competition. Doug remembers her telling him to grab a stool and show Carleton Place how its done slicing the bread. He said he was pretty proud doing that job.

Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum- read-In Memory of Mike Moldowan — The Man Behind the Fries

But Doug not only helped Murray, he helped Mike Muldowan at the chip wagon and when he got there early in the morning Mike would give him a large pail of potatoes to peel. I asked him if he ate his weight in chips for payment. He said, “You know I would have, but I remember getting silver coins, Mike never paid in paper!”

His mother Edna Florence Caldwell, was a hairdresser on Bridge Street and his grandmother, Mrs. Jamieson played the organ at St. James Anglican Church, and his two aunts sang in the choir. He also remembers the horse stables in the back of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. The farmers came to church with their teams and sleighs and it was quite the sight as they parked. When they left they had to unharness everything and regroup, and mumbled and grumbled. But that was not the only place they mumbled in grumbled at St. Andrew’s. In the days that Captain Hooper’s house Raloo Cottage was going to be torn down the citizens of Carleton Place were not happy. Not happy at all! So I asked him,”Did they protest?” He said they protested the way they always did– complaining in front of the churches on Sunday!”

Photo from Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum–Around 1950 the southeast corner of Lake Avenue and Moore Streets looked like this. Originally the site of W.A. Nichols’ Sons Lumber, it became W & S Building Supplies around 1948

He also remembers every year the gypsies–(2021 word Romani) and would set up shop on the corner of Lake and Beckwith near where Nichols Planing Mill was. He said it was quite the event as in those days the stream behind it was quite larger than it is today.

So they mumbled and grumbled about the Levine building across the street, and they muttered about the new Fleming Funeral Parlour opening up on Lake Ave West. Because, that’s the way things were done. His grandfather, Will Jaimeson was a CPR railroad man and he did the Ottawa Brockville run which was a very prestigious run in those days.

Doug remembers being put on top of one of the L carts and having his Grandfather perform a steam show so to speak. His grandfather would holler to start shovelling the coal really fast and once the steam would get up to speed it was a sight to see. So he ran the smaller wheels and then the bigger wheels to show his grandson how much power that Locomotive had. Meanwhile the coal man wasn’t too happy and he would tell young Doug that his grandfather was showing off just because he showed up.

This morning I had a ZOOM chat with Doug Caldwell, as the family reunion is coming up October 30, 2021 at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place. He told me about the continual arguments he used to have with ‘Jimmy Edwards’ at Edwards Grocery when he went to go pick up a ‘knob of tobacco’ for his uncle on the corner of Coleman and Franktown Road. He was allowed a treat so he wanted to make sure he got the most bang for his money. In those days Jimmy Edwards bagged the candy and they were all in small paper bags. At each purchase Doug would argue with Jimmy saying he was getting cheated as he was not getting a full handful. Doug at the age of 5 would argue up and down but it was always the same result. Jimmy Edwards held the upper hand with those paper bags full of candy. So Doug at age 5 would leave the store muttering, hauling his little wagon down the street on his way to deliver that ‘knob of tobacco’ to his uncle. One day that tobacco got the best of him and he chewed off the corner of that tobacco wanting to see what it tasted like. Well you and I probably have a good idea what it tasted like, and he said he felt like he was poisoned. Worse that that he had to tell his uncle how he lost the corner of that tobacco.

In the end everyone moved away after the war so the family could seek better fortunes, and on October 30th, 2021, the families are all reuniting once again at the Gastro Pub in Carleton Place for a salute to the “Jamieson Daughters”. It’s time for the family to reunite, celebrate and time for the younger generations to know their history. Family reunions are the place where you remember where you came from.

Thanks Doug for the stories!!

Shane Wm EdwardsNever heard anyone call my grandfather “Jimmy”. But in a “Remember When” column in the Canadian by S.C. Ribe in the late 40s, I read a reference to a “Jimmy Edwards” who had taken pictures of some Doukhobours at the train station. Having a copy of that picture I finally made the connection. read-How Many Women Does it Take to Replace a Team of Horses?The Doukhobors

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

– photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum at the Caldwell Jaimeson Dunlop Reunion.