Tag Archives: Bryson

Robert Bryson and Stuart Dunn — Canoeing Down the Timber Slide

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Robert Bryson and Stuart Dunn — Canoeing Down the Timber Slide
Victoria Mill Slide- Almonte.com

Almonte Gazette

That fine old Scotch couple, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bryson, once of Union street, had an interesting chat about the days long gone by, and learned of an incident which he takes the liberty of telling the readers of this paper. It was away back in 1835 or there about that the  first “ timber slide” was built in Almonte, for the purpose of avoiding the great height of falls which the lumbermen had to overcome in some way. 

In 1835  Hon. (then plain Mr.) George Bryson and Mr. Simon Dunn established shanties throughout-Ramsay in the neighbourhood of where the Drummonds and the Kennedys and other pioneers lived then, as some of them still do. In those days the logs were hauled to a point opposite Messrs. Timmins & Co’s present store, and were left there until the river opened in the spring, when they were put down the slide into the Bay below. 

At that time the slide extended from the Bay up to the lower end of Mill street. When the logs had all been put through the slide in 1835 there was great talk among the shantymen about running the slide in canoes, to avoid portaging, but when it came to the point most of the men thought twice.   

However, Mr. Robert Bryson, then a sturdy young fellow of 18, decided to risk the trip, in company with his brother’s partner, Mr. Simon Dunn. They had a splendid large pine log canoe, and ventured on their risky trip, full of courage, both being skilful canoeists. The canoe and its occupants shot down the steep decline at a rapid gait —as rapidly as a toboggan goes down its slide in winter—and all went well until they came to the fourteen feet of a drop from the end of the slide into tho Bay.

As soon as the canoe left the slide it split into two pieces—right down the middle—and the two passengers were immediately submerged in the rapids below. However, they were soon- fished out and given attention, and were none the worse for their involuntary endeavour, and they were many a time afterward congratulated on their nerve and daring expedition and established a record for the first trip by boat down the Almonte slide. They lost a fine canoe, but that was a small matter compared with the fact that they accomplished what none of the other men dared to attempt. Afterwards “ aprons’ were put on the various slides, rendering them navigable for canoes when skilfully handled. 

https://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/shingle-bolt-flume-in-capilano-canyon

Vintage logging – flumes and sluiceways click

Remembering the Old Log Timber Slide

A Slippery Day on Union Street 1898

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A Slippery Day on Union Street 1898

While returning from church on Sunday evening a number of people were walking on the road because of the slippery condition of the sidewalks. When, near Mrs. Bryson’s residence on Union street the pedestrians were met by a horse and cutter in which were two men, and when passing Mayor Thoburn and his daughter, Mrs. Percy (Annie) Jamieson, the driver struck out at them with the whip, hitting Mrs. Jamieson across the, face and knocking off her glasses. Mr. Thoburn at once followed the rig and endeavored to ascertain who the occupants were but he failed in this. The act was a dastardly one and-might have resulted in serious injury, though fortunately such was not the case. The matter has been reported to Chief Lowry and an effort will be made to bring the culprits to justice. 1898

1955, Thursday June 23, The Almonte Gazette front page
Final Tribute Is Paid Mrs Percy Jamieson

Mrs Percy Jamieson, a well-known resident of Almonte until seven years ago, died on Tuesday, June 21st., in an Ottawa private hospital, in her 84th year. She was the former Annie Victoria Thoburn, a daughter of the late William Thoburn and his wife, Margaret Lyons. Born in Almonte, she was brought up here, attended the local schools and later graduated from Whitby Ladies’ College.

In 1897 she married Percy Jamieson who predeceased her in 1936. For a year after they were married, Mr and Mrs Jamieson were residents of Ottawa. At the end of that time Mr Jamieson became associated with Mrs Thoburn in the operation of his woollen mills and the couple returned to Almonte. She leave a son and two daughters: William A. of Almonte; Mrs A.W. Wylie (Elizabeth), Chatham, and Mrs G.S. Charlesworth (Mary) of Edmonton. A sister, Mrs A.M. Ivey (May E.) died two years ago.

There are, also, seven grandchildren. Mrs Jamieson was a very charitable women and she took a great interest in church work. Originally a member of Trinity Methodist Church, she continued with that congregation after union and at one time or another headed or was actively identified with most of the church organizations. An honourary president of the Alexandra Club, she took a great interest in the hospital. During the first World War she was prominently identified with patriotic endeavours. Some years before Trinity Church was merged with Bethany United Church, Mrs Jamieson presented the former with a very fine set of chimes as a memorial to her father, the late Mr Thoburn.

This is now part of the musical equipment of Almonte United Church. Mrs Jamieson removed to Ottawa when she felt her health was on the decline and for the last seven years has resided in a private hospital there. It was only within the last year, however, that she became seriously ill and was confined to her bed. Many residents of Almonte will recall this kindly lady with affection and regret because she had many good works to her credit. The funeral was held on Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m., at the Comba Funeral Home. Rev J. Ray Anderson, minister of Almonte United Church, officiated, assisted by Rev H.L. Morrison of Brockville, formerly of Trinity United Church, Almonte. The honourary pallbearers were Messrs P.A. Grieg, Q.C.; W.C. Pollack, Jas F. Patterson, F.A.C. Darling, Thorpe Kelly and J.E. Lindsay. The pallbearers were Messrs Jas Wylie, Jos Jamieson, Wm R. Jamieson, Hal B. Kirkland, Milton Cochran and Don Carr. Interment was in the family plot in the Auld Kirk Cemetery.

Name:Annie Victoria Jamieson
Gender:F (Female)
Birth Date:2 Dec 1870
Birth Place:Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Death Date:21 Jun 1955
Death Place:Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Cemetery:Auld Kirk Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Mississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Has Bio?:Y
Father:William Thoburn
Mother:Margaret Thoburn
Spouse:Percy Jamieson
Children:Elizabeth Thoburn WylieWilliam Algernon Jamieson
URL:

Photo of the Jamieson House 1905–Public Archives

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

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The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

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1972

This historical home is located on a charming little country road next to the Mississippi River to the southwest and connecting the Appleton Village with Highway 44. Known for many years as the Ross Craig farm — it was built in 1857 by Robert Bryson. The house appears on the Walling map of the counties of Lanark and Renfrew, and all the homes on this road once competed with each other to see who could produce the best quality home.

Some evidence points to the kitchen “ell” as being the first building, as the window trim is plain unlike the rest of the home which carries the “eyelash trim”. The floors are made from maple or pine and architectural details point out that this home was once one and a half storeys being carefully built to a two storey later on in years. The staircase is boxed in and very wide similar to the Glendinning home in Glen Isle.

The original kitchen was eventually turned into a family room and there is a minor mystery in the home. At the top of the stairs next to the master bedroom is a small room which is now a bathroom, and it was formerly either a large cupboard or a baby’s room as a peek through tiny window is on the master bedroom wall.

It is obvious that the Bryson and Craig families lived in the main house and used the smaller section for the hired help. This home is one of the rare homes in the area that has no fireplace and they probably used box stoves or ornamental Franklin stoves. William Kennedy and family bought this home from Hugh Grace who had followed the Craig tenure in 1969. It was always a farm but through the years the acreage of the property got smaller. In 1972 the Kennedy’s moved to Mattawa and any current history of the house known would be appreciated.

historicalnotes

Along the ninth line between Shipman’s Mills and Appletree Falls located the Matthew McFarlanes, Sr. and Jr., and Thomas Patterson; while across the river along the 10th line located James Leitch, Arthur Lang, Peter McGregor, John Smith, James King, James Bryson, James Orr, Richard Dulmage, William and Robert Baird. James Bryson from Paisley and James King took Lot I11 of the 10th concession. George Bryson, a son of James, was one of the first Lanark County pioneers to go into the lumbering trade in 1836 and later, with his brother Robert, engaged in lumbering at Fort Coulonge and along the Black River in the province of Quebec. George Bryson represented Pontiac County in that province and was called to the Legislative Assembly of Quebec in 1867. The village of Bryson was named after him. During the lumbering era George Bryson and Simon Dunn established shanties throughout Ramsay and built the slide at Shipman’s Mills. There was talk of running the slide in canoes to save portage but all flunked out except Robert Bryson who with Dunn ventured the risky trip in a large pine log canoe. The canoe and crew shot down the steep incline at a rapid clip and all went well until they came to a 14 foot drop at the end of the slide into the bay below. The canoe split in two and the men were thrown into the rapids below but were rescued by onlookers.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

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Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?