Tag Archives: bridges

So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

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So What Did We Find Out About this Photo from Lanark Village?

 

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So what did we learn about this old photo from the Almonte Gazette and Carleton Place Canadian from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum?

I thought these should be documented for future Lanark County humour..

Judy Arnott identified this photo Lanark Village, replacing the old bridge on Main street.

1.Ken Barr Isn’t that the walkway Terry Donaldson drove his Mini across?

Apparently Ken it was..

2. Folks noticed on The Tales of Carleton Place that the sign had acquired a few shots.

Apparently–A metal sign is a golden opportunity.

  • It’s a solid target that won’t fall over If you shoot it
  • You don’t have to pay for the target
  • It is already set up for you, so you don’t have to walk to set it up nor retrieve it after finished shooting
  • It is in an area where no one else is around before and after the target
  • It is straight on from where you are standing
  • It makes a loud rewarding ding when you shot it
  • The 0 is a pre-painted bullseye for you

 

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We also found out that it was taken in 1977–1978

 

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum Photo

 

historicalnotes

 - Sod turning ceremony for Lanark Village dam...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 04 Aug 1977, Thu,

 

 - SMITHS FALLS, Dec.-121.t!-!31-year-oia...

 

 - Clyde river, when the accident occurred. " He...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 21 Dec 1956, Fri,
  3. Page 2

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

 

The Disappearing Street Signs of Carleton Place

The Woman Who Got the Dead End Sign Removed in Carleton Place

Things That Disappear in Carleton Place — Elgin Street and The Queen’s Hotel Sign

The Name Game– Changing Almonte Street Names

Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

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Stories About Deachman’s Bridge?

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#11 Deachman’s Bridge, Lanark

How to Get There: Go to Lanark Village on Highway 511. In the middle of the village on themain street (George), turn east on Owen and then onto Rosetta Road. The bridge is over the Clyde River, just out of the village.

When was this flood? Any stories about the bridge?

Theresa Barr

That bridge flooded every year until late into the 1970s. The ditches would fill with water to the dump corner. The road always closed for at least 2 weeks every spring.
Leanne Schonauer
Even till this day sometimes the bridge still floods in the spring and my in-laws Joan and Ernie McDougall have to cross Caldwell’s fields to get out. They live on Herrans Lane right at the bridge
Brady Scanlan
Spent a lot of time fishing at that bridge.
Crystal Cordick
My kids caught alot of fish off that bridge
 
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Water was up to the bottom rail 2 yrs ago April 17. Four days later it was over the road
 
Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International
As a boy, I fished off that bridge many times with my Dad, brothers and friends. It was the place to go!
John McDougall
i fished off that bridge alot of times fishing bull heads
Will Coleman
A very well built bridge.
Susan M. Storie
Fond memories of fishing as a child there, with my dad and brother, uncles 🙂
John Fuoco
You are all scaring me. We bought a farm recently on Rosetta backing onto the clyde not far from this bridge
 
Jocelyn Ford
John Fuoco you will just have to go thru Pine grove when it floods to get to Lanark
 
Ken Barr
John Fuoco If you bought the Van Noppen farm, you’re pretty safe.
 
Ken Barr
Apparently my name is carved into the top rail of this bridge. I still remember the talking to I got from my dad, because it was his knife I was using. This would have been about 1971. Ernie and Pete Hall and me spent months at this bridge fishing.
Theresa Barr
Ken Barr only one place. Lol. We tried carving our name many places on the bridge
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Photo taken in spring 2019.
Arthur Whyte
Spent many an hour fishing off that bridge
Roxane Mesman
One of my favourite areas from home
Les Morris
I spent half my life in that bridge
Les Morris
That brings back a lot of memory s
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Penny Goertzen
A few months late to this post but this bridge is my youngest son’s favourite place to go for our morning walks. He could spend literal hours there. ❤

 

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relatedreading.jpg

Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Memories of the Pickerel Run Innisville

The Floating Bridges of Lanark County

Down by the Old Pike Hole–The Island Bridges of Carleton Place- Before and After

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

Rideau Ferry Road– Black Snakes Bridges and SS#6

What Happened on the CPR Railway Bridge?

Tales from Oliver’s Ferry

The Tragic Tale of the Rideau Ferry Swing Bridge

Geddes Rapids Bridge 1903 — Dalhousie Lake

 

Dianne Poulin

Ken Barr

Penny Goertzen
Penny Goertzen

So Which William Built the Carleton Place Railway Bridge?

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This morning I found this in the Perth Courier Archives doing some research and became fascinated.

Perth Courier, March 10, 1899

The Almonte Gazette says William Scrimgeour, formerly of Almonte, died at Lakefield, Ontario at the age of 83 years.  His parents came from Perthshire, Scotland but the deceased was born while they were crossing the Atlantic.  He learned the trade of  a millwright and also became a building contractor.

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St. Johns Presbyterian Church – Almonte, Ontario – 1865.

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Youngs Hotel at Sand Point, Ontario (near Arnprior) owned by James Young (1817-1872)built in 1850. In 1870 the Hotel was transferred to James Youngs son also named James Young.

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This sketch of St. Paul’s Anglican Church and parsonage appeared in the “Canadian Illustrated News” from Montreal Jan 4, 1879, immediately after the parsonage was built in 1878. 

 

The obituary in the Perth Courier went on to read that William Scrimgeour built the railway bridge at Carleton Place, St. John’s Church at Almonte, Mr. James Robertson’s store, St. Paul’s rectory, Rosebank Woolen Mills at Ramsay, Young’s Hotel at Sand Point, and many others.  He was a violinist of great reputation and a crony of the late Robinson Lyle the famous novelist (Lyle Robinson was the author of Edgar Cayce’s Story Of The Origin And Destiny Of Man).  His wife was killed by a railway accident at Port Hope 13 years ago and was buried beside her in that town.  Their children were eight, four boys and four girls.

He built the railway bridge? For years I have understood that William Willoughby built the Carleton Place railway bridge.

 

So I looked up William Scrimgeour, who was described as “the architect and builder” of the Canada Presbyterian Church in ALMONTE, ONT., 1865 (North Lanark Advance [Almonte], 1 July 1865, Almonte Presbyterian Church Centennial 1865-1965) The cornerstone for the church was laid on 24 June 1865, and this cut stone building was designed “in the Corinthian style”, with seating to accommodate 800 parishioners. It was enlarged in 1892, but later sold and used as a storage building from 1912 to 1925. The church was then re-purchased by the Presbyterian Church, and remains in use today.  In fact, the family name appears also to have possessed the office of master-builder to the king back in Scotland. In February 1531After searching for hours I found no other references to the work of William Scrimgeour .

On a UK genealogy site I found the following:

The obituary [dated 1899] notes that William Scrimgeour was married in Michigan some sixty years ago. There were eight children – four boys and four girls. His wife was killed in a runaway accident thirteen years earlier on the streets of Port Hope, Ontario.

Subsequently William came to Carleton Place first and then two years later  went to Almonte.  As a contractor for over twenty years he built many of the buildings in Almonte, including St. John’s church, Mr James Robertson’s store, St. Paul’s rectory, the Rosebank woollen mill and others.

It is interesting to note that the spelling of the family name often changes. In the Perthshire records the name is “Scrymgour” (believed to probably have been a misspelling of Scrymgeour) and in subsequent records of New York and North Dumphries/Galt, Canada, the spelling remains fairly constant as “Scrimger”. So, that is why the family is hard to pinpoint.

After pouring through at least 50 Almonte Gazette’s I noted he was a very popular man in Almonte , not only as a builder, but as the head of the Almonte  Citizens’ Brass Band and a local concert violinist.

So who really built that railway bridge?   I would say that because William Scrimgeour came to Carleton Place first, he did have something to do with building that railway bridge as recorded in the Perth Courier. In all probability– he was probably working alongside with William Willoughby .

If I had to put money on it my guess is that he moved to Almonte a few years later as Carleton Place just wasn’t big enough for *two temperamental diva– like Scottish builders. 🙂

 

historicalnotes

A railway bridge at Carleton Place a century ago was built to span the Mississippi at the location of the town’s present C.P.R. Bridge. Trains from Brockville, drawn by small wood-burning steam locomotives, began in the summer of 1859 to run as far as Carleton Place and Almonte. This was the same oldest railway line of the district that was surmounted last year by the new overpass on the south side of the town opposite the end of Napoleon Street.

William Willowby

If you’ve ever seen the McArthur Woolen Mill, Central School, Prince of Wales High School, St James Church, St Mary’s Church, and of course the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum, then you are familiar with some of William Willowby’s work.  He was a local stone mason, who along with his brothers, Isaac, Abraham and Jacob, and his sons, built numerous buildings in Carleton Place and the surrounding area, including Almonte and Smiths Falls.

William also built the railroad bridge that spans the Mississippi. In the Brigil Homes subdivision behind Giant Tiger the  newly built playground is named after the Willoughby’s. So when you drive down King Street you can see “Willoughby Park” and know who it’s named after. I had no idea until today.

*Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Death

Scrimgeour, William, male, b. U.S.A, d. Feb. 15, 1899, Lakefield, bur. Feb. 17, 1899, age: 82 years, Location: R07L16#?, next of kin: G. Scrimgeour, fath

Related reading:

Pardon me Boys — Is That the Carleton Place Choo Choo?

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Pardon me Boys — Is That the Carleton Place Choo Choo?

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The plaintive whistle of the trains will be forever silenced in Carleton Place.

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A railway bridge at Carleton Place was built more than 100 years ago to span the Mississippi at the location of the town’s present C.P.R. Bridge. Trains from Brockville, drawn by small wood-burning steam locomotives, began in the summer of 1859 to run as far as Carleton Place and Almonte. This was the same oldest railway line of the district that was surmounted last year by the new overpass on the south side of the town opposite the end of Napoleon Street.

The area around the birdge was a popular portage place and the natives had their camps here.Several parties of Indians were encamped late in the year at the east side of the town and frequented the streets daily. An Indian war dance was held at a random local residence weekly. I have no idea if that was by choice or not. I guess you just stayed indoors and let them do their thing.

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If you’ve ever seen the McArthur Woolen Mill, Central School, Prince of Wales High School, St James Church, St Mary’s Church, and of course the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum, then you are familiar with some of William Willowby’s work.  He was a local stone mason, who along with his brothers, Isaac, Abraham and Jacob, and his sons, built numerous buildings in Carleton Place and the surrounding area, including Almonte and Smiths Falls.

William also built the railroad bridge that spans the Mississippi. In the Brigil Homes subdivision behind Giant Tiger the  newly built playground is named after the Willoughby’s. So when you drive down King Street you can see “Willoughby Park” and know who it’s named after. I had no idea until today.

In August of 1964, three young girls were caught on the Mississippi River narrow railway bridge. Watching in horror, a CPR Ottawa-bound Canadian passenger train was coming towards them quickly. Two sisters were forced to jump from the 25 foot high train-only bridge and they landed in the shallow waters of the rock-bottomed Mississippi River. Read the rest here.

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C.P.R. (Canadian Pacific Railway) Passenger Train crossing Mississippi River Bridge at Carleton Place, Ontario, 1900
National Archives

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Photos: Linda Seccaspina and photos and files from The Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Was the McNeely Bridge Funded on “Drinkin’ Fines”?

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Brock Zeman’s lyrics in his song Carleton Place state that “the McNeely Bridge was funded by drinkin fines–we  all chipped in!”  I Googled that statement and I came with up nothing– as I knew I would as it is was I love calling folklore. However, an old newspaper article praised the new section of Highway 15 providing a route around the south side of Carleton Place. That bridge crosses the Mississippi river near the outlet of the lake was known as Indians Landing– the location of the old Indian  campground.

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In 1823 John Hays crossed the river at nightfall and met his fate by the swift Spring current that carried him over the falls. Hugh Bolton was celebrating his 10th year in business and they were still crossing the river by boat.  In the winter the crossing was on the river ice when it was secure enough. The first bridge was built by Edmond Morphy, and it was a low level timber structure. The 1829 bridge was rebuilt by Hugh Boulton whose home still stands on Mill Street. When the bridge became unsafe Albert Teskey of Appleton was the next contractor. Our Carleton Place railway bridge was built to span the Mississippi at the location of the town’s present C.P.R. Bridge. The wooden railway bridge was replaced by one of steel construction on stone piers and designed by William Willoughby of Carleton Place.

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I have written about our floating bridge that connected the end of Flora Street and the Hawthorne Mill. That bridge too was pretty shaky. In 1902 Abner Nichols & Son brought their season’s log drive down the lake to their newly opened sawmill at the riverside on Flora Street; while two drives of logs, ties and telegraph poles were reaching the mill operated by Williams, Edwards & Company at the dam. Basically, the floating bridge was no more than tied logs. I don’t think I could have crossed that bridge if someone had paid me.

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Each summer found the main bridge in need of repairs. When I see that William Moore was the lowest bidder at $1400 to repair the bridge, no wonder. I know $1400 was an enormous amount of money in those days, but what did it really get you when you built a bridge. Then again, if you were firing a cannon from the middle of the bridge during the Carleton Place festive celebrations–that has to add to the wearing conditions of the bridge.

The Gilles company decided to add another bridge down by the portage area by McArthur Mill, where the island bridges still exist. They built a dam and mounted it by a planked bridge..The town’s old wooden bridge at the same time received its last major repairs, only to be shaken and damaged again by Spring waters.

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A superstructure was talked about to replace the old Bridge Street bridge– no doubt because Pakenham was erecting their 5 span stone bridge. It was nothing but the best this time–wrought iron on stone piers. A Carleton Place bylaw to raise $10,000 to build an iron bridge across the river was voted approval in 1887. Tenders received by A. R. G. Peden, municipal clerk, led to contracts with William Willoughby of Carleton Place for its masonry piers and with Robert Waddell of Trenton, Ontario, for the iron work.

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The foundation stones had to be laid in the water when seams in the rock bed of the river were found to prevent diversion of its flow by coffer dams. The wrought iron superstructure was ordered from Glasgow. During low water levels of the fall of 1887 the bridge was erected. While the rattle of its railings and the rumble of its planked surface or lower tie rods may be remembered by those who traveled on it until its replacement in 1928. The bridge had served adequately as a community and highway bridge for over forty years. One has to remember it was mostly foot and animal traffic. In  1910 there were only seven automobiles owned in Carleton Place, including a Buick, a Packard, a Reo, Fords and a Russell-Knight. In neighbouring notes: a steel bridge replaced the wooden bridge across the Mississippi River at Innisville in 1913.

So, in answer to the title Brock Zeman was wrong. The only place I can find something that was funded by drinkin’ fines is in New Jersey. Port Authority police, charged with patrolling and enforcing the law on the bridges as well as on their entrance and exit ramps, made about 400 drunken- driving arrests through Nov. 30 in Pennsylvania. They didn’t fund a bridge- it was something else.

On the back bumper of the new patrol car is painted, “Funded By: Drunk Driving Enforcement Fund.”

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Photo Above by Robert MacDonald and all others from the files of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Dec 1928, Tue,  Page 28

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Mar 1958, Sat,  Page 8

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place