Tag Archives: bread

Mello-Creme Cereal – Carp– AND — Mello Creme Bread – 95 Echo Drive

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Mello-Creme Cereal – Carp– AND — Mello Creme Bread – 95 Echo Drive
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Aug 1926, Sat  •  Page 20

This Product is being made at the Carp Flour Mills at Carp– 20 miles from the Capital City, on the Pembroke Highway. In three months over 110 merchants were stocking the line in Ottawa alone. In the early part of James Kyd, a well known grocery broker of Ottawa, was secured by Mr. Hopkins to take over tbe selling and distribution of Mello-Creme, and by the spring of the same year the sales had spread over all Eastern Ontario and into Montreal, also the Eastern Townahipa of Quebec, besides Toronto, which was being given a trial. It was decided that a limited company should be formed to lake over the new cereal.

CLIPPED FROM
North Bay Nugget
North Bay, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1926, Tue  •  Page 10

CLIPPED FROM
North Bay Nugget
North Bay, Ontario, Canada
16 Nov 1926, Tue  •  Page 10
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1927, Sat  •  Page 25
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1927, Sat  •  Page 25
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 May 1953, Thu  •  Page 25

MELLO CREME BREAD — EWAN Bakery, Ottawa

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1927, Sat  •  Page 25

Adopted for Bread

 In conjunction with the sale of Mello-Creme for a cereal, has come its rapid adoption to the making of a whole wheat bread. Today thousands of loaves of Mello-Creme Bread are being made In Ottawa and many points as far as Windsor by the Kwan Bread Company. The popularity of the bread is demonstrated by the fact that there is never a loaf left over and the Ewan Bread Company (95 Echo Drive) is now making alterations to their building- to take care of the tremendously increased demand.-10 Dec 1927

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Oct 1929, We

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Sep 1925, Tue  •  Page 12
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Oct 1929, Wed  •  Page 18
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Oct 1929, Wed  •  Page 18

Later at 95 Echo Drive

Debby Curry — Bringing Home the Bread

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

  1. Could This Be the Best Banana Bread Ever?
  2. Old fashioned Raisin Bread WITH ZEST
  3. Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery
  4. Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery
  5. Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery
  6. Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe
  7. Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery
  8. Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery
  9. Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?
  10. Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery
  11. Mellowing About Mello Rolls

Pass the Ambrosia! Memories of Cookbooks Linda Knight Seccaspina

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Pass the Ambrosia! Memories of  Cookbooks Linda Knight Seccaspina
Photo is a typical Robin Hood Float that was in every local parade– this one was in Delta 1937)

Pass the Ambrosia! Memories of Cookbooks Linda Knight Seccaspina

Years ago before I went to California I had 100’s of cookbooks. My favourites were the church cookbooks from the local rummage sales and I have given away a lot–but today I still have about a 100 left. 

Remember the well worn coil- bound cookbooks put out by Canadian companies? I still have well-used copies of Robin Hood, Maple Leaf  and Red Rose which are probably museum items now. These little books are full of things our grandmothers used to make, such as dinner rolls, pickles, jams, jellies, and the beloved tomato aspic. 

By today’s standards some of the ingredients are not for healthy eating: canned soup, shortening, MSG and lots and lots of mayonnaise. But these books were especially big on baking and contained classic recipes for breads, cookies, squares, cakes, and especially pies. This is perhaps where their timelessness shines through for everyone.

The recipes from my vintage cookbooks are from times I still remember, and in the 50’s my mother used to make Tuna Pinwheels and Canned Devilled Ham Canapes for her canasta parties. Bernice Ethylene Crittenden Knight was a stickler for an attractive food presentation, and she also made something called Congealed Salad for holiday meals. A combination of Orange Jello, Cool Whip, crushed pineapple, and wait for it, shredded cheese. I think my Dad called it “Sawdust Salad” and I seriously tried to remain clueless as to why. 

I’m sure everyone has a family member that says they’ll bring a “salad” to a family dinner, but then they bring some Jello concoction they found in one of their cookbooks. Bonus points if it has marshmallows in it like the amazing Ambrosia Salad.  Actually, I feel more justified in calling anything a salad if I dump leftover taco beef and salsa onto a little lettuce topped with shredded cheese.

There are many loving memories of my grandmother baking on Saturdays. The old beige crock which held the flour under the cupboards — a hint of yeast — and the mixture of sweat pouring from her forehead. This mixture was placed in loaf pans, and if the day was bright the bread was set out in the sun to rise, otherwise the pans were placed near the big black wood stove which made the room toasty and cozy.

After the dough had risen to twice its size it was quickly placed in the oven. Making bread was only the beginning of the baking day– cakes, pies and cookies followed. There might be homemade applesauce for supper, toast for breakfast, bread pudding and the other delicious dishes which came from my grandmother’s magical kingdom. It was always homemade with love. That meant that I had sneaked the spoon out of the mixture and licked it and no one was the wiser when it was used again.  

The steamed brown bread baked in a can was certainly one of Grammy’s few baking tragedies. It was so horrible my Dad took my Grandmother’s failed recipe target shooting at the Cowansville dump. I would like to think that some of those rats got to feast on one of those brown breads. Of course, maybe after sampling it, they might have wanted to be put out of their misery.

The best is all those hundreds of recipes lovingly collected, saved from the newspapers or magazines, with notes written on the side. Finally assembled into cookbooks, the secrets were still not there. I remember writing down some of my Grandmother’s recipes and next time we made it she had changed the amount of pinches and methods on her recipes.

Despite living in a healthy society, or trying to, cookbooks seem to remain every bit as popular as romance novels and mysteries. Nostalgia triggers a story about our lives, helping us reflect on traditions and moments about the days when our  parents and grandparents were alive. That’s why we should never lose print recipes, and real paper-based cookbooks. 

Those mystery meat recipes, and foods that were the same colour as rainbow radiation will always resonate with us. That’s because we get to see and relive the gravy stained favourites, and the memories of family. If reading about cookbooks has you craving a big slice of cake, you’re not alone. I was always told if you can read you can cook. I can attest that my cooking is so fabulous that even the smoke alarm cheers me along from time to time.

CLIPPED FROM
Standard-Speaker
Hazleton, Pennsylvania
18 Jul 1963, Thu  •  Page 22

Funky Soul Stew was Once Cooking in Carleton Place

Pig Candy — Cooking With Chef Dr. Dusty from Ballygiblin’s

What was a Fowl Supper?

Was the Butter Tart Really Invented in Barrie, Ontario? Jaan Kolk Files

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

Debby Curry — Bringing Home the Bread

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Debby Curry — Bringing Home the Bread

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Thanks Debby Curry for sending this. I noticed your post today, thought i would share this, if you would like to post. This is my grandfather’s family.

Sorry about the small type– Put two sizes..

relatedreading

 

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

The Little Door by the River

    1. Lanark County Recipes Beaver Tail and Muskrat — No thanks LOL

    2. Could This Be the Best Banana Bread Ever?

    3. Old fashioned Raisin Bread WITH ZEST

    4. Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

    5. Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

      Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

      Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

      Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

      Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

      Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

      Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Looking for Someone That Can Bake Betty Some Buns!

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baking-dog_o_1023852

Fellow Canuck George Canyon once sang in his song Betty’s Buns:

They say it’s in how she kneeds the dough
Betty makes her buns buddy soft and slow
People place their orders from miles around
to buy Betty’s buns in this one horse town

Remember the smells of the kitchen and the taste of fresh bread with butter? I remember my Grandmother baking bread so there would here would be bread for Grampy’s packed lunch when he went on a job out of town.

The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market OPENING MAY 14TH is searching for someone who can bake bread.  Tis is “a loaf or death situation” so to speak.

If you are that person please contact:

cpfarmersmarket@yahoo.ca

613-809-0660