Tag Archives: blacksmith

Hopetown Blacksmith Shop-Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

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Hopetown Blacksmith Shop-Buchanan Scrapbook Clippings

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

Hopetown Blacksmith shop from the 1984 book Lanark Legacy by Howard Morton Brown- Have you read it?
Hopetown Downtown- Perth Remembered
Hopetown Hotel–Perth Remembered

Did you know? From the Lyn Museum

Lyn’s Main Street General Store

John 0

The former Miller General Store on Main Street , 25 Main St West, was first owned by A. T. Trickey, who was a drug store general merchant. He ran it until approximately 1890 when it was purchased by Mr. Gardiner. Mr. Gardiner did not have a druggist pharmacy license so he hired a fellow from Tamworth, Ontario by the name of C. M. Taylor. He went to work for Mr. Gardiner, later married Mr. Gardiner’s daughter and eventually took over the store. They eventually took over the Gardiner house, which is north of the United Church. They lived there for many years and had one daughter who lived there until approximately the 1950’s. Then Eldon Coon took over that house and built a new house for Miss Taylor. The Coleman’s originally built the house, and it was said that every brick in it had been wrapped in tissue paper and shipped from England and all the steel rims around the outside had been made in France by the same people who made the Eiffel Tower. When John McCready took over the store it became more of a grocery store than anything. He sold ice from the ice house behind the store. Stack’s hotel that was next to it burned in 1928 and what was left of the walls remained there until the late 1940’s. He ran the store until the late 1940’s when he sold it to his son Dave McCrady. Dave ran the store for a couple of years and then sold it to Frank McCrady, his brother. In 1947 Frank sold it to Earl “Dusty” and Cleta Miller. They took over the store, enlarged it, fixed the apartment upstairs and lived above the store. They built a building beside the store from which they sold appliances. They ran it until 1985 when they sold it to the Pourier Brothers. Under their ownership the business didn’t survive and they left. The store was sold to a fellow from Hopetown. He started to renovate the inside but it caught fire and burned through the roof. The lot remained empty until Ursula Veltcamp bought it and built the little restaurant that is now there.

Related reading

Sam Kelford Blacksmith- The Buchanan Scrapbook

The Last Blacksmith Shop –R. J. Neil

Nelson Affleck Blacksmith Clippings and Genealogy

Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

  1. The Witch of Plum Hollow and the Blacksmith
  2. The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop
  3. Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook
  4. The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

The Story of Grace Patterson

180 Forge Works – Artisan Blacksmithing – 180 Forge Works ..

The Cannon on Union Street Hal Kirkland

Sam Kelford Blacksmith- The Buchanan Scrapbook

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Sam Kelford Blacksmith- The Buchanan Scrapbook

With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Nov 1981, Wed  •  Page 5

The Last Blacksmith Shop –R. J. Neil

Nelson Affleck Blacksmith Clippings and Genealogy

Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

  1. The Witch of Plum Hollow and the Blacksmith
  2. The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop
  3. Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook
  4. The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

The Story of Grace Patterson

180 Forge Works – Artisan Blacksmithing – 180 Forge Works ..

The Cannon on Union Street Hal Kirkland

People of Carleton Place– John Porter Prospect Carleton Place

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Photo from –Up the line: More portraits of the Ottawa Valley Perfect

 

John Porter lived in Carleton Place, but was born and raised in Prospect. His dad Johnny Porter was a blacksmith and acknowledged as one of Beckwith’s blacksmiths, learning his trade in Smiths Falls and then moving to his permanent home  in Prospect until he died in 1933. John was what one would call a reluctant blacksmith, liking farming more than being a blacksmith.

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The Anderson garage in Ashton with its 36-foot-long log walls was once the blacksmith shop, as was the Porter garage in Prospect. Little remains to indicate their original use, except possibly the profit-sharing coupon found in the former, apparently issued to the purchasers of Peerless Horseshoe Nails and redeemable only by blacksmiths.

 

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9-In 1962 Arnold and Moira Guetta bought the property property from Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Rees . Previous to the Rees’ tenure, the stone house belonged to John Porter who had bought it from a son-in-law of William James about the turn of the century.-Historical Tidbits on Prospect

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Jul 1945, Mon  •  Page 15

 

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A new plaque has been unveiled in Beckwith Township telling the story of the village of Prospect. On Sunday, Oct. 1, the day of the annual Doo in the Derry, Beckwith council, staff and members of the heritage committee and public gathered outside Prospect United Church on Richmond Road for the reveal. – Submitted photo- Read the rest here..

 

A new plaque has been unveiled in Beckwith Township telling the story of the village of Prospect.

On Sunday, Oct. 1, the day of the annual Doo in the Derry, Beckwith council, staff and members of the heritage committee and public gathered outside Prospect United Church on Richmond Road for the reveal.

“The plaque talks about the early settlers in Prospect, and the importance of the road from Richmond to Perth – the road through Prospect,” Kidd told the Canadian Gazette on Oct. 14.

In regards to the initiative, “this term of council thinks it is an important thing,” he said.

The first families to settle in Beckwith arrived in 1818.

Noted on the new plaque: “One of these groups of highlanders left Perthshire in the spring of 1818 after a long voyage across the ocean. Continuing up river they disembarked at the foot of the Chaudière Falls on the Ottawa River. From there they went overland to Beckwith arriving in early fall.”

The first road through Beckwith, from Richmond to Perth, was cleared in 1819. British soldiers did the work. With a width of 60-feet, the road connected the military settlements of Richmond and Perth. It entered Beckwith at Prospect, travelled west to Franktown, continued to Gillies Corners and further on to Perth.

In 1816, following the War of 1812, the Perth Military Settlement offered land grants north of the Rideau to emigrants from Scotland, and to veterans of British regiments, encouraging them to stay in Upper Canada, to help build and defend the fledgling colony.

By 1857, Prospect’s population was 75, and it had daily mail. Some of the prominent people were as follows: William Baxter, shoemaker; John Burrows, postmaster and store and tavern keeper; William Coleman, Wesleyan minister; Patrick Devine, carpenter and joiner; William James, sawmill owner; Fleming May, schoolmaster; Joseph Morris, blacksmith; Johnny Porter, blacksmith; James Sanders, carpenter and joiner; John Scott, sawmill and carpenter’s shop owner; Peter Stewart, tailor; and John Tombleson, shoemaker. Read the rest here..

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Jun 1944, Fri  •  Page 22

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1939, Wed  •  Page 17

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Apr 1976, Thu  •  Page 44

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1939, Wed  •  Page 2

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1939, Tue  •  Page 15

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Historical Tidbits on Prospect

The Last Blacksmith Shop –R. J. Neil

Nelson Affleck Blacksmith Clippings and Genealogy

Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

  1. The Witch of Plum Hollow and the Blacksmith

  2. The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop

  3. Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

  4. The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

The Story of Grace Patterson

 

The Last Blacksmith Shop –R. J. Neil

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The Last Blacksmith Shop –R. J. Neil

Screenshot 2020-04-18 at 17.57.00Screenshot 2020-04-18 at 17.57.201961 Almonte Gazette

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Hopetown Blacksmith shop from the 1984 book Lanark Legacy by Howard Morton Brown- Have you read it?–

historicalnotes

view of Menzies House from downtown Almonte - Picture of Menzies House 1850  Bed and Breakfast, Almonte - Tripadvisor

1850 – The large white frame built over a stone house served as a merchant’s store and had a blacksmith’s building at the end of the property. The merchant, John Menzies, became the registrar of North Lanark County. Read The Menzies House

History of our Home - Menzies House

almonte.com

Nelson Affleck Blacksmith Clippings and Genealogy

Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

  1. The Witch of Plum Hollow and the Blacksmith

  2. The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop

  3. Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

  4. The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

The Story of Grace Patterson

Nelson Affleck Blacksmith Clippings and Genealogy

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Nelson Affleck Blacksmith Clippings and Genealogy

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1953

 

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Nelson John Affleck
Birthdate: November 18, 1872 (81)
Birthplace: Ontario, Canada
Death: December 13, 1953 (81)
Lanark, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Place of Burial: Lanark, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Immediate Family:
Son of “Black Bill” Affleck and Sarah M Affleck
Husband of Annie Penman
Father of Bill Affleck; Mary Affleck; Jean Affleck; Elizabeth Affleck; George Archibald Affleck and 1 other
Brother of Elizabeth Playfair Currie; R. Grant Affleck; Minnie Affleck; Jean Affleck; William Lloyd Affleck and 4 others
Half brother of Jessie Affleck and Amanda Grey Locke
Occupation: Blacksmith / garage owner
historicalnotes

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 21 Aug 1924, Thu,
  3. Page 1

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 24 Jan 1948, Sat,
  3. Page 5

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 11 Jul 1949, Mon,
  3. Page 8

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 03 Jan 1957, Thu,
  3. Page 28

 

relatedreading

Words of Mary Borrowman Affleck

Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

  1. The Witch of Plum Hollow and the Blacksmith

  2. The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop

  3. Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

  4. The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

The Story of Grace Patterson

Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

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Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

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Being “bled” by the village blacksmith was one of the ways in which the people of Bell’s Corners and the surrounding country used to keep well in the 1800s. Mr. Wm. Arnold narrates that when he was a boy in the 1860s Thomas Bowes, who kept a blacksmith shop about a mile and a halt up the road towards Hazeldean, had quite a reputation as a “blood letter” and people used to go to him from miles around.

Mr. Bowes did not profess to be a physician in the regular sense, but he did profess to be real handy in opening a vein in the arm and letting out superfluous of diseased blood.  It must not be understood that Mr. Bowes put his customers’ arms on the anvil and opened the vein with a two foot steel chisel. Not at all. Mr. Bowes, according to Mr. Arnold, owned some very fine lances such as the surgeons of the day used, and he handled them most expertly. Such was the word of the rest of the blacksmiths in all the counties.

Some said that if Thomas Bowes had had a college education he would have made a very excellent surgeon, as he had, despite his strength a very fine touch, and was very attentive binding up the arm and stopping the flow of blood after the necessary amount had been “let.”

Doctors ‘ were rather scarce in the area, and there was a shortage of leeches, and one had to go to Ottawa for “leeches.” As the reputation of Mr. Bowes as a blood-letter grew, fewer people went to Ottawa for leeches. It was a common thing in or around Bell’s Corners to hear one man say to another, “Where are you going?” and have the other reply, “Oh, up to Tom Bowes’ to get bled.”

Mr. Bowes’ services were mostly called into requisition in cases of bruises or other injuries which caused discoloration. But it often happened that men went to him when they merely felt out of sorts and when they reasoned that a little loss of blood would do them good.

In those days no one had heard of high blood pressure. Had such a thing been known, then it is quite possible that more would have gone to him for blood-letting on that account. Mr. Arnold says that Mr. Bowes, besides being a good blood-letter, was a good blacksmith and that he will long be remembered as one of the “Institutions” at the Bell’s Corners country.

 

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 Friday night October 5- FREE! Donations to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum would be appreciated–

AND it’s on!!! Explore the amusing and ghastly tales of old Carleton Place. Escape into the past as your offbeat guide Linda Seccaspina provides you with an eerie, educational, yet fun-filled adventure. Learn about many of Carleton Place’s historic figures and just like you they walk the dark streets of Carleton Place in search of nightly entertainment, yet, they don’t know that they themselves are the entertainment. Walkabout begins Friday night October 5 at 7 pm in front of Scott Reid’s Office–224 Bridge Street– the former Leland Hotel –and ends at the Grand Hotel. About one hour.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

  1. relatedreading

    The Witch of Plum Hollow and the Blacksmith

  2. The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop

  3. Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

  4. The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

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Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Sep 1966, Sat,  Page 37

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Sep 1966, Sat,  Page 37

 

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2016– A big thank you to Tina & Rob for generously donating a box of Walter Cameron carvings to the museum this week! Walter, the famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook was also well known for his whimsical wooden carvings, especially later in life. We are so pleased to be able to showcase these pieces in our Walter Cameron show case. They still bring a smile. Pop by the museum this weekend and see them for yourself!

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Sep 1966, Sat,  Page 37

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Aug 1971, Sat,  Page 43

These items below belong to Brian Dowdall Beckwith Township Councillor

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Aug 1971, Sat,  Page 43

 

You can see by the fitted hoof, that oxen have cloven hooves and must have a two piece shoe or they would become lame under working conditions.
The double halves of a shoe makes it dificult to find and collect both halves a pair of oxen shoes. most shoes are found only when they are thrown off by the animal. ….hotairfan.
PS. Oxen can not lift each foot to be shod. If this is tried, they will fall over, so-o-o-o, the oxen must be lifted entirely off the ground with a hoist and straps to be shod.comments

 

Dave Goodings--My dad and I went to his house a few times. Walls covered in wooden chains and he had made a replica of the blacksmith shop where he and his father had worked.
 
He was quite the carver alright.
 

Earl Donaldson commented:

I often wished I had taken the time , to stop and chat with Walter , when I passed through Fallbrook . Walter used to sit outside a lot , in his golden years . I purchased the book by Audrey Armstrong , “The Blacksmith of Falbrook” , and it had a lot of information in it , some pertaining to my Grand Parents , Christopher and his wife Teresa ( Craig ) . My grandfather had a shingle/saw mill in Falbrook , which later burnt . My Grandparents were great friends , with Walter’s parents . I observed Walter , shoeing a horse on his ninetieth birthday , also the auction sale , where all Walter’s prized possessions found another home . Walter was certainly a legend in his time !

 

relatedreading

 

The Amazing Mr. Paul

He Did What? Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

From the Buchanan scrapbooks

The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

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The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

Increased horseshoeing charges, to fifty cents per shoe, were quoted in a joint announcement of fourteen blacksmith shops.  They were those of Duncan Cameron, Richard Dowdall, Robert Kenny, McGregor Bros. (Forbes and Neil), and James Warren & Son, all of Carleton Place ; Edward Bradley, William Jackson, Edward Lemaistre and William McCaughan, all of Almonte ; and George Turner of Appleton, George Kemp at Black’s Corners, S. Robertson at Ashton, Robert Evoy at Innisville and Michael Hogan at Clayton. 1898 Almonte Gazette

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

1912 BLACKSMITHS‘ PRICE LIST from the LCGS Online Resource Library–click here..

An original of this printed broadsheet is in the
Perth Museum, Perth, Ont.

 

NOTICE

We the undersigned Blacksmiths of the district have
arranged a new schedule for horseshoeing to take
affect (sic) on and after the 15th day of Nov. 1912.
New Shoes No. 0, 1, 2 at 25c per shoe
New Shoes No. 3 & 4s at 30c per shoe
New Shoes No. 5 & up at 35c per shoe
Resetting Shoes No. 0, 1, 2 at 15c per shoe
Resetting Shoes No. 3 & up 20c per shoe
and 75c per set of 4
Bar Shoe 50c per shoe
Resetting Bar Shoes 25c each

WM. HAW, Perth A. BUCHANAN, Playfair
P. FURLONG, Perth M. McINTYRE, Elphin
J.H. McMILLAN, Perth J. WILSON, McDonald’s
Corners
M.P. WHITE, Perth S. McILRAITH, Lanark
J. ALLAN, Scotch Line N. AFFLECK, Lanark
WM. DeWITT, Eliott J. GALLINGER, Lanark
JAMES CONLON, Glen Tay A. CRAIG, Middleville
WM. NOONAN, Balderson R. SOMERVILLE,
Middleville
A. SHEPPARD, T. MOLYNEAUX, Hopetown
Ferguson’s Falls
BRUCE EDWARDS, J. LABELLE, Watson’s
Drummond Centre Corners
A. LEIGHTON, Harper W.J. WRATHALL, Poland
J.L. CAMERON, Fallbrook E.J. McFARLANE, Lavant

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

 THEN&NOW

JAMES BLACKSMITH SHOP

Edward James, whose father Benjamin came from County Wexford, Ireland, was born on the 2nd line of Drummond in 1837. Leaving the farm he opened this blacksmith shop, built by Lett James, at the corner of Drummond and North St. He then built a brick house (5 Drummond St. W.) Edward was the father of George S. James and Lawrence H. James. This is where they got their start in the iron business. It is believed that the blacksmith shop was moved to stand behind the George James residence that is shown in this picture as it is now. This home was built in 1924-25 from rock quarried from the James property on Rideau Lake

 

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Photo from Lanark & District Museum 

 

Walter Cameron, the famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook was also well known for his whimsical wooden carvings, especially later in life. We are so pleased to be able to showcase these pieces in our Walter Cameron show case. They still bring a smile. Pop by the museum this weekend and see them for yourself! See today’s other article about Walter Cameron.

 

 

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Hopetown Blacksmith shop from the 1984 book Lanark Legacy by Howard Morton Brown- Have you read it?

 

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At the time of the registration of William Jr.’s birth, William Sr. was listed on the birth registration as a carpenter. Later, William worked at the police station, and Jane cooked meals for the prisoners. They lived at 52 Market St., Smiths Falls. William had children, Madeline, James and Horatio, from his first marriage (Marian Rathey 1842-1872). Jane and William’s son Stan worked on the CPR. William (called Ginny) was a butcher, with no family. Mary was known as Minnie.

James, Horatio and William were among the people who migrated into Smiths Falls in the 1870s and 1880s. James was a carpenter. Horatio was a grocer. William was a blacksmith. CLICK HERE for more The Weekes Family

Descended from Joseph Weekes and Jane Fullerton, immigrants to Ontario in 1839 from County Antrim, Ireland (plus a few related families)

 

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Blakeney School Picture 1898 – 1900

10th Line School – Ramsay Township.This picture was submitted by Alex Holtby –

Margaret Jean Stewart is second from the left “X” and was born in 1888. She was the adopted daughter of Robert Ferguson Stewart and Isabella Smith. Robert was a blacksmith in Blakeney and Almonte.

 

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J. T. Hughes blacksmithing shop at Innisville. Photo submitted to the Perth Courier, 1984 by Mr. Crampton-Photo from Perth Remembered

 

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Blacksmiths 1909 Middleville Laurie Yuill photo

 

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Photo from Perth Remembered

 THEN&NOW

Balderson in 1905 boasted few trees along the dirt road which was the main road to Perth. In the top photo from the left: the original Balderson cheese factory erected in 1881, the Noonan Blacksmith Shop, Cowie home, Anglican Church and rectory. From the right: the Noonan home, Jone’s Store, Haley property (1962), J.M. McGregor property, J.C. McGregor barn and home. Balderson at one time was known as Clarksville.
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The Carleton Place Canoe Club. Pictured here are the first two clubhouses – the first was originally the blacksmith shop for the Caldwell Sawmill, located at what is now Riverside Park

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William Edward McGillivray
4.24.1877 – 1972Spouse: Etta McDonald
1877 – 1952Grave: Hillcrest Cemetery, Smiths FallsParents:
William: Jane Amelia Weekes and William McGillivray
Etta: Maria F. McDonaldWilliam was a blacksmith when he first moved to Smiths Falls from the farm. Later, he was a butcher, and was known by the name “Ginny”
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THOMAS A. SMITH
The death occurred on Monday morning of Thomas Alfred Smith, formerblacksmith at Clayton Village for over 30 years. Death was due to a heart seizure. He was 76 years of age. Born in Ramsay Twp., he learned theBlacksmith Trade and operated a shop in Clayton until five years ago when he retired. He was a veteran, of both World Wars and an active worker in St. George’s Anglican Church. In 1906 he married the former, Phamia Cochrane of Almonte who survives along with two sons, Robert of Almonte, William of Kingston, Margaret (Mrs. Archie Laramee) of Ottawa; Isobel (Mrs. Arnold Craig) of Almonte; Mabel (Mrs. Wm. Kellough of Toronto; Ruby (Mrs. Archie Murdock) of Trenton; Bernice (Mrs. Newton Campbell) of Kingston. A son Norman was killed in action at Hong Kong in World War II. Following a short service at the Comba Funeral Home, Almonte, on Wednesday morning, the body was conveyed to St. George’s Church, Clayton where a service was conducted by the rector, Rev. M. F. Oldham. Interment was in the United Cemetery, Clayton
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Years ago where the new St. James Church addition is at the corner of William. It sits, more or less, on the footprint of this big frame building from long ago. It housed James Warren’s blacksmith shop, and later, C.R. Whicher (???), House Signs and Carriage Painter. Image taken from a postcard circa. 1915.
 - Winchester. Mr. James Weekes l recovering from...
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The trough was presented to the Town of Carleton Place by the horse Association in 1925. It was later found on the Andison property on High Street. Bill Andison kindly donated the horse trough to our museum in 1995.
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Middleville Store, Middleville, Ontario.

Tom Deachman,
remembered by old timers. as the village blacksmith at Middleville

 

 

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 - 7VF. Rielly Dies Aged-95, Aged-95, Aged-95,...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 30 Jan 1956, Mon,
  3. Page 4

More Local Blacksmiths

 

Perth Courier, Feb., 1870 names names names

Devlin—Birth, at Drummond on the 5th (?) Concession on the 4th inst., the wife of Thomas Devlin, blacksmith, of a daughter.

Bathurst Courier, Aug. 29, 1834 Duncan McIntosh places an ad notifying the public he has commenced business as a blacksmith in Perth.

Perth Courier, August 20, 1897 W.J. Kirkham has sold his dwelling in the East Ward to Michael Murphy, Drummond, who is coming to reside in town. Mr. Kirkham wishes to pay or rent a house convenient to his blacksmith shop in the West Ward.

By 1812, Burritts Rapids had become a bustling hamlet. At the peak of its prosperity, it had telegraphic and daily mail, 2 general stores, a bakery, a millinery shop, 2 shoe shops, a tin and stove store, a grist mill, a woolen mill, a tannery, blacksmith shops, 3 wagon shops, a cabinet shop, 2 churches, 2 schools, 2 hotels, a bank and an Orange Lodge.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Sep 1935, Wed,  Page 11

 

historicalnotes

Iron nails were so valuable that people burned down buildings just to get the nails back. Archaeologists have uncovered nails and nail-making tools from the early years. So nails were not unduly rare or expensive; nor were they something to waste.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 May 1955, Sat,  Page 33

 

 


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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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