Tag Archives: bells corners

I’ve Got a Hex on You — Jaan Kolk and Linda Seccaspina –Historic Rabbit Hole Series

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I’ve Got a Hex on You — Jaan Kolk and Linda Seccaspina –Historic Rabbit Hole Series
The buildings, which are designed in a Gothic Revival style, officially opened on June 6, 1866, about a year before Canada’s Confederation. On February 3, 1916, a fire. … Confederation. On February 3, 1916, a fire destroyed all but the Library of Parliament. Reconstruction began later that year and was completed in 1927. When the Centre Block of the Parliament Buildings was rebuilt in 1916, teams of horses hauled six-ton loads of Nepean sandstone blocks from a quarry near Bells Corners. Each team could make the roughly 30-km. round trip just once a day. LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA / PA-130624

Linda Seccaspina

A few weeks ago I wrote about Mrs. Lowney who lived near Bishop’s Quarry who was recorded in the Ottawa Daily Citizen that her cows would not give milk because someone working in Bishop’s Quarry had the “evil eye”. It seemed to be the norm on those days as those that hailed from Ireland in the 1800s brought over their beliefs in hexes and the dreaded evil eye.

Catherine Lowney, a widow, who lived near Bishop’s Quarry, attributed fear of the “evil eye” on her property because her cows would not give milk, even though it was the height of the milking season. Of course one would think there was a very logical explanation of the absence of milk from Mrs. Lowney’s cows, or was there?

At that period (1860s) stone for the Parliament Buildings was being quarried near Mrs. Lowney’s house and many strangers were employed in Bishop’s Quarry in Nepean. So when gossip starts you know that maybe thirsty strangers from the quarry sneaking into her farm and milking her cows would be a valid excuse. Of course she failed to see anything but some bewitching Hocus Pocus taking root in the neighbourhood. Her belief held firm that a certain neighbor or quarry worker possessed the “evil eye’ and was getting back at her for some imagined wrong. We all know how that goes.

Of course my interest wheel piqued to HOT and I began to wonder where the former Bishop’s Quarry was. As I searched for information I came across Bruce Deachman’s article in the Ottawa Citizen. Q is for Quarry: Forgotten, overgrown quarry provided the building blocks of Ottawa

Since I could find nothing about Bishop’s Quarry I somehow knew after reading his article that this forgotten Campbell’s Quarry in Nepean was one and the same. Campbells quarry closed in 1962, when the National Capital Commission expropriated the land for the Greenbelt. Situated right beside Highway 417, just west of Moodie Drive, lie overgrown remains of the former Bishop’s/Campbell’s Quarry that supplied building material for the Parliament Buildings, the Dominion Observatory and the Canadian Museum of Nature.

(We love comments and input–this from Tim Cartwright)

(Tim Cartwright Campbell’s quarry is not the site directly beside the 417. It still exists within the property of Natural Resources off of Haanel Dr. This is why they objected to having it reopened in more recent times.

So, just to make sure I wasn’t going in the wrong direction and steer my readers into reading a fish tale I contacted my historian friend Jaan Kolk. Actually it’s more of a Facebook ‘pity” PM that begins with: “JJJJJJJJAAAAAAAAn, can you help me please”?

Jaan Kolk

Yes Linda, it must be Bishop’s quarry to which Bruce Deachman refers. Henry Bishop owned 200 acres of farm land with a stone quarry: Lot 6, Conc. II OF. The 1879 Belden Atlas shows his house and “white sand stone quarry” on the south side of Corkstown Road, about midway between Moodie Drive and Eagleson. The Canadian County Digital Atlas Project gives the year settled as 1821.

The 1965 aerial photo layer at GeoOttawa shows the bright scars of what looks like quarrying on both sides of Corkstown Road about 2 km west of Moodie (halfway between Moodie and Eagleson.) Zoomed in, one can see a road along the strip stretching south. Google maps shows traces of the same features, and shows the pathway identified as Greenbelt Pathway W. / Trans-Canada Trail. I believe the Citizen photo is of the area in the woods where the trail bends south away from the Queensway. That was Henry Bishop’s quarry in 1861; the quarries north of Corkstown would have been Keefer’s. Campbell began operations on that extended sandstone ridge in 1916, and shut down when it was bought out by the NCC about 1962. I can’t say exactly where they were operating then; there appears to have been a second roadway into that general area from Hazeldean Road

Henry Bishop’s was not the only stone quarry in the area, and may not have been the biggest supplier of stone for the Parliament Buildings. In “The City Beyond”, Bruce Elliott writes: “In the spring of 1861 nearly a hundred quarrymen and stonecutters were boarding in and about Bells Corners. Henry Bishop boarded about 30 of the quarrymen who were working at Keefer’s quarry on the Corkstown Road. He also ran a tavern, which he came to regret because of the insobriety of some of the workmen.

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he Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Jul 1960, Sat  •  Page 35

Nevertheless, his fine stone house was built with the profits. Maps show A. Keefer as part-owner of the lot on the north side of the Corkstown Road, directly across from Bishop’s. Elsewhere, Elliott notes that fine stone house (“Bishop’s Palace”) was built with stone from Bishop’s own quarry.

Here is an Apr. 30, 1966 Citizen note on the demolition of Bishop’s hotel for the Queensway -Jaan Kolk
Linda Seccaspina

Actually, it was recorded in the History of the Ottawa Valley that Mr. Henry, father of Mr. Bishop of Wellington Street had a fine place, Bishop’s Palace. Their sandstone quarries out which much of the ‘decoration’ of the parliament buildings of the city was produced was located between Courtney’s and Pollock’s.

The Irishmen like Henry Bishop’s family who founded Nepean’s Corkstown not long afterwards are believed to have started settling there as early as the 1840s. It became a substantial community, partly due to the flourishing quarry works established nearby that employed as many as 100 men at a time, and provided much of the fine Nepean sandstone used in the first Parliament Buildings.

These men had many hardships to deal with, and one of the first houses along the old Corkstown Road was soon turned into a tavern where the weary workers could raise their flagging spirits. Henry Bishop owned it, and his comfort station was known far and wide as the Bishop’s Palace.

The two-storey stone structure, built in 1861 was known before, the turn of the century as “Bishop’s Palace” when it served as an inn for travellers, area farmers and workers from nearby Nepean Sandstone Quarries.

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Here is Henry Bishop’s obituary from the Ottawa Journal, Nov. 2, 1901: (thanks to Jaan Kolk)

In April of 1966 National Capital Commission awarded a contract to Alfred Beaulne Construction for the demolition of Bishop’s Palace on the south side of Corkstown Road. It had also served as a private residence from the early 1900s until 1938 when it was acquired by NCC. News of impending demolition was greeted with “regrets and resignation’ ‘by Nepean Township Historical Society.

In an odd note, maybe there was a hex of some sort in that area near the quarry. Today, Campbell’s/ Bishop’s Quarry now sits abandoned, and years ago it stopped being able to provide sandstone. According to Deachman’s article on the abandoned Campbell/ Bishop’s Quarry-” repairs to the generally neglected stonework of the Museum of Nature required many tons of replacement sandstone (approximately five per cent of the museum’s stone had to be replaced), architect Barry Padolsky and the Department of Public Works attempted to have the quarry re-opened. Their efforts ultimately failed, however, when Natural Resources Canada objected, noting that the heavy machinery needed for the quarry would throw off the calibration of the instruments at their research laboratory adjacent to the quarry.” (Q is for Quarry)

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Oct 1966, Wed  •  Page 27

What was once a historical workplace for 100s of men now fades into the sandstone so to speak. So thanks to Jaan Kolk for his help– another historical area like the Pure Spring Ginger Ale water spring is documented for generations to come.

Pointing to the sandstone buildings around us, some of which had stood there for several hundreds of years, she commented on how old everything in Oxford looked. Can’t they afford anything new? she asked earnestly.”-In the Light of What We Know

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Dec 2018, Sat  •  Page A2
Jaan Kolk's Profile Photo, Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, hat, stripes and indoor
historian Jaan Kolk
Linda Seccaspina
Henry Bishop

1880s- 
Legislature of the Province of Ontario

Descriptive Catalogue
of Ontario Minerals
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Henry Bishop–Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Apr 1851, Sat  •  Page 2
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Henry Bishop mentioned.. Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Oct 1874, Tue  •  Page 4
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of interest to all because of the clipping above it…. Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Sep 1880, Mon  •  Page 4

Campbell's Quarry--Archie Campbell

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Jan 1932, Sat  •  Page 13
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 May 1960, Sat  •  Page 44
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1949, Fri  •  Page 15
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Sep 1959, Wed  •  Page 21

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Jan 1912, Mon  •  Page 11

Q is for Quarry: Forgotten, overgrown quarry provided the building blocks of Ottawa

Particulars About Pure Spring Ginger Ale — Jaan Kolk and Linda Seccaspina Historic Rabbit Hole Series

A. Huckels & Co. -The Story of a Bottle- Thanks to Jaan Kolk

The Marvellous Jaan Kolk

Talking Through Your Hat? Jaan Kolk

So Where Was Caldwell Mills? Thanks Jaan Kolk

The Thrift Store Couple – More Information-Jaan Kolk

The House on the Hill — Up the 8th Line of Ramsay — Jaan Kolk Files

Britannia Boat House Doomed— April 1907 Ice Jam –Jaan Kolk Files

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

The Cholera Epidemic of 1911

The Ashton Hotel– Questions Questions Flemmings and McFarlanes

Benoit & Richardson Photo– a Mystery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Does Anyone Remember Cohen’s in Lanark Village?

Was the Butter Tart Really Invented in Barrie, Ontario? Jaan Kolk Files

THE STRANGE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE 8 YEAR-OLD McGILTON BOY

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THE STRANGE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE  8 YEAR-OLD McGILTON BOY

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One of the Most Baffling Mysteries of Eastern Canada

 

This is a story of the tragic and mysterious fate of the 8-year-old son of Thomas McGilton, of Ottawa, who was supposed to have been lost in the stoney swamp west of Bell’s Corners in the year 1870.  Thomas McGilton was a bootmaker, whose store  was on Mosgrove street, a well known and respected citizen.  One day in the early summer of 1870, during some sort of a celebration in Ottawa, his eight-year-old son disappeared.

A search began in Ottawa and as it proved fruitless and was widened to take in the roads out of the city. The only clue was found at Bell’s Corners, where the toll-gate keeper distinctly remembered seeing a few days previously: a boy of his age and appearance pass through the gate and turn up the road toward Richmond. At once a searching party of sympathetic villagers was organized. They travelled as far as Richmond, but neither sight nor sign of the boy could be had.

Image result for stony swamp richmond

 

It occurred to some that the McGilton boy might have wandered into the great stoney swamp a couple of miles southwest of the village. It was decided to scour the swamp, and volunteers were called for. The whole male part of the village and scores of farmers turned out and the searchers kept growing till some fifty men and many boys were in the hunt. The search was kept up for days but without avail. Every bit of the dreary swamp was ransacked, but the boy was not found, nor was there the slightest indication that he had fallen a victim to wild animals of any sort of natives.

As a last resort, someone came to Ottawa and engaged a native woodsman who had a reputation as a guide and trapper. But he was not able to throw any light on the disappearance.  Sadly the searchers returned to their homes and confessed that they were beaten. Then a theory gained credence that the boy bad been picked up by some passing farmer and that he would be later returned to his home.

But whatever the facts of the disappearance were, the boy was never found. This became one of the most mysterious of the unexplained mysteries of Eastern Canada. It should be told that this happening  was just a couple of months prior to the great fire of 1870 which swept Bell’s Corners.

 

historicalnotes

 

1872 Deaths - from the Ottawa Free Press Thomas McGilton
Oct 19, John George, and on Oct 21, Arthur, the 2 youngest sons of Thomas MCGILTON(?) 
of Mosgrove Street.
Dec 7,  Mary Jane, 24, wife of William John JOYCE and daughter of Thomas MCGILTON.

 

 

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Clipped from

  1. Memphis Daily Appeal,
  2. 19 Aug 1870, Fri,
  3. First Edition,
  4. Page 1

 

 

The great fire of 1870– Leona Kidd
Ten died as flames swept 60-mile swath through Valley
By Kathy McPerson-Fox, Murphy’s Point Provincial Park
Kathy McPerson-Fox, who worked for the Ministry of Natural Resources at Murphy’s Point Park last summer, did a great deal of research through old Perth Couriers to dig out old stories of “The Great Fire”.
The following is an introduction by Kathy as well as stories about the fire written in 1870. During the summer of 1870, as a result of dry weather and high winds, a great fire swept through this region destroying land and property from Westport to Ottawa, a distance of approximately 60 miles.
Bells Corners and Ironsides, near Ottawa were completely devastated. An estimated ten people lost their lives.

The fire travelled along fences, corduroy roads and railway lines. During the peak of the fire in August, 1870, the great portion of the Canada Central Railway Line was on fire, with many station houses lost. North Burgess Township in which Murphy’s Point is situated, was one of the areas hardest hit by the fire. The absence of many softwoods throughout the hardwood stands is one loss that is evident today.

 

The Stony Swamp Conservation Area offers the greatest diversity of trails and activities, including: interpretive exhibits on geology and natural history; wetland boardwalks; a winter bird-feeding station; historic sites such as the Lime Kiln; and portions of the Rideau and Trans Canada trails.
Trails in the area include:
Bell Park, Bruce Pit, Jack Pine, Lime Kiln and Old Quarry trails.

Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

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Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

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Being “bled” by the village blacksmith was one of the ways in which the people of Bell’s Corners and the surrounding country used to keep well in the 1800s. Mr. Wm. Arnold narrates that when he was a boy in the 1860s Thomas Bowes, who kept a blacksmith shop about a mile and a halt up the road towards Hazeldean, had quite a reputation as a “blood letter” and people used to go to him from miles around.

Mr. Bowes did not profess to be a physician in the regular sense, but he did profess to be real handy in opening a vein in the arm and letting out superfluous of diseased blood.  It must not be understood that Mr. Bowes put his customers’ arms on the anvil and opened the vein with a two foot steel chisel. Not at all. Mr. Bowes, according to Mr. Arnold, owned some very fine lances such as the surgeons of the day used, and he handled them most expertly. Such was the word of the rest of the blacksmiths in all the counties.

Some said that if Thomas Bowes had had a college education he would have made a very excellent surgeon, as he had, despite his strength a very fine touch, and was very attentive binding up the arm and stopping the flow of blood after the necessary amount had been “let.”

Doctors ‘ were rather scarce in the area, and there was a shortage of leeches, and one had to go to Ottawa for “leeches.” As the reputation of Mr. Bowes as a blood-letter grew, fewer people went to Ottawa for leeches. It was a common thing in or around Bell’s Corners to hear one man say to another, “Where are you going?” and have the other reply, “Oh, up to Tom Bowes’ to get bled.”

Mr. Bowes’ services were mostly called into requisition in cases of bruises or other injuries which caused discoloration. But it often happened that men went to him when they merely felt out of sorts and when they reasoned that a little loss of blood would do them good.

In those days no one had heard of high blood pressure. Had such a thing been known, then it is quite possible that more would have gone to him for blood-letting on that account. Mr. Arnold says that Mr. Bowes, besides being a good blood-letter, was a good blacksmith and that he will long be remembered as one of the “Institutions” at the Bell’s Corners country.

 

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 Friday night October 5- FREE! Donations to the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum would be appreciated–

AND it’s on!!! Explore the amusing and ghastly tales of old Carleton Place. Escape into the past as your offbeat guide Linda Seccaspina provides you with an eerie, educational, yet fun-filled adventure. Learn about many of Carleton Place’s historic figures and just like you they walk the dark streets of Carleton Place in search of nightly entertainment, yet, they don’t know that they themselves are the entertainment. Walkabout begins Friday night October 5 at 7 pm in front of Scott Reid’s Office–224 Bridge Street– the former Leland Hotel –and ends at the Grand Hotel. About one hour.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.

  1. relatedreading

    The Witch of Plum Hollow and the Blacksmith

  2. The Curious World of Bill Bagg — The Gillies Blacksmith Shop

  3. Walter Cameron the Famous Blacksmith of Fallbrook

  4. The Blacksmiths of Lanark County

Clippings About Viking Helicopters

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Clippings About Viking Helicopters

 - jMiL -zl -zl "' Mora Allen Journal Photo A hot...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  29 Jun 1979, Fri,  [First Edition],  Page 1

Viking Helicopters moved close to Carleton Place, and into the grand old stone house, which was used as the office building and the hangars were nearby. After a number of years the stone house caught fire and the contents were destroyed. A couple of the “overnighters” narrowly escaped that night.

 

 - '" .'it. Barry Parks helps Jim Rozon and...

 - Cool fund raiser Although the weather was...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  25 Apr 1977, Mon,  Page 37

 - I P IN THE AFRICAN AIRSPACE: Viking Helicopters...

 - Ottawa copter firm's expansion hazardous...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Oct 1979, Wed,  Final Edition,  Page 30

 - Kidnapped in Ethiopia Efforts continue to free...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Jan 1979, Thu,  REVISION,  Page 4

 - Capture began on tense note t Released pilot to...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Apr 1977, Tue,  Page 19

 

 

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Carleton Place Parade 1977 Viking Helicopters

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Carla Coker sent in this photo

This was a float by Viking Helicopters (complete with a helicopter)! My dad, Roy Coker, worked there. He was dressed as Klinger in one of my mom’s coats with gaudy costume jewellry and looked the part. Wish I had a photo of him!

 

Ross Johnson The helicopter on the float has history… it was the first commercially certified helicopter in the USA… Bell Helicopter

 

 - I would, like to know where the schools for...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Nov 1972, Sat,  Page 44

 - CP photo Larry Camphaug, president of Ottawa's...

Clipped from The Brandon Sun,  24 Jun 1977, Fri,  Page 18

 - Helicopter crash kills Nepean man David Johns,...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  04 Jun 1973, Mon,  Page 1

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

 

Chimneys and Black Boxes —Leigh Instruments

Remembering Industry in Carleton Place- Digital and Leigh Instruments

Bomb Scare in Carleton Place

It was Friday the 13th on Napoleon Street in Carleton Place