Tag Archives: beckwith

Duncan McDiarmid — Family of the Derry

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Duncan McDiarmid — Family of the Derry

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Submitted by Leah

Duncan McDiarmid, his second wife Mary (a widow) their son John and Duncan’s daughter from his first marriage to Margaret McGregor arrived in Quebec from the Parish of Comrie, Perthshire aboard the Brig Curlew.  They, along with two other families the Fergusons and the McLarens, walked from there to Beckwith Township to start a new life and hopefully a better one.

Dr. George Edward Kidd wrote in his book The Story of The Derry,  “Duncan McDiarmid was the elected captain of the group, and he called a final halt to his little band when it had reached lot 22 in the fifth concession.  Here, in a maple grove and by the side of a spring which still runs water,…., they made their camp.  Later they filed claims on nearby lots, and here they made their new homes.”

It appears that the rest of Duncan’s first family arrived after as they are not on the list of passengers on the Brig Curlew that brought Duncan, but are present in Beckwith Township by 1820 according to the census of that time compiled by the Town Clerk.

Of the first family, Angus McDiarmid, eldest son of Duncan and Margaret, married Annie Livingston, daughter of Donald and Janet (Jeanet) McAra.  The Livingston family also traveled on the Brig Curlew in 1818 from the Parish of Dull.  They settled in Goulbourn Township on the border of Beckwith.  Angus settled on a clergy reserve, lot 24 concession 5, and here he and Annie raised their family.   This family consisted of John, Peter, Duncan, Donald, Janet, Margaret, Mary and James.

John McDiarmid bought out his siblings’ share of the farm on Angus’s death and remained there until his death in 1876.  He married Janet McRorie and they had two sons, John Duncan and James A.

Peter, Duncan and Donald all went on to teach, then Peter and Duncan turned to study medicine, while Donald began studies to become a Baptist Minister.

Donald died before his studies were complete in 1864.

Peter first practiced medicine in Scarborough, Ontario, but then made his way to Fontanelle, Adair County, Iowa and married Anna Hetherington in 1874.  They had one son Pierre who died in Fontanelle in 1922.  He too followed in his father’s footsteps and became a doctor.

Duncan McDiarmid took over the practice worked at by Peter in Scarborough and he married a widow, Agnes Purdie, who had two children from her previous marriage, David and Viola Jacques.

James attended McGill Medical School, but was still living at home in the 1871 census.

Of the daughters, Janet died young and unmarried in November 1871.

Margaret married John Ferguson in 1867 and died in 1877.

Mary married Joseph Kidd in 1869 and stayed in the Derry.  They had the following children, Margaret, George Edward, Elizabeth M., William Livingston, James, Angus, John, and Annie.  Mary died in 1889.

John Duncan, son of John, grandson of Angus, took over the farm and married Christina Drummond.  His son John Earl then managed the farm and it is still in the family today.

Duncan McDiarmid’s other children from his first marriage did well for themselves as well.

Peter, youngest son of Duncan and Margaret married first Janet Livingston, sister to Annie, Angus’s wife.  They had one daughter Jessie who was later raised by Angus and Annie after Janet’s death around 1841.  Peter then married Janet McIntosh in 1842.  They had the following

Elizabeth

Peter

Duncan

Ellen Jane

Margaret

Alexander

Donald

Christina

Catherine

Catherine, the daughter who came on the Brig Curlew with Duncan and her step mother Mary, married Alexander Kennedy about 1823.  He was a son of Donald and Catherine Ferguson.  They first lived in Beckwith, then selling their farm and moved to Carleton County, Nepean.  Catherine died 1890.

Elizabeth married Alexander Scott and they lived on the 9th concession of Beckwith.

Christina married Robert Kennedy, brother to Alexander Kennedy.  They lived in Beckwith, later part of Robert Kennedy’s farm becoming the Kennedy Cemetery.  Christina died in 1873.

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Photos from  the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

McDiarmids was just up the street from the Keyes Building on Bridge Street where The Granary is located-note the balcony.

 

The history of Duncan’s second family is well researched on his one son James who married a Carleton Place woman by the name Jane Morphy.  More information is available at the Carleton Place Public Library by another researcher.  James was a merchant in Carleton Place.

Daughter Ann married Alexander Ferguson in 1839.

I have no information on son Duncan except he became a Presbyterian Minister.

Donald married Elizabeth McIntosh in 1847 and became a Baptist Minister.

I have no information on Hugh except he was to have moved to Toronto.

The son John was left the farm on Duncan’s death, and he later sold it to Alexander Ferguson, his brother in law, and moved his family to Osgood, Ontario sometime after 1861as far as I can tell.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Shadows of Beckwith Cemeteries

McDiarmid Family– Murals and Vimy Ridge

You Can Leave Your Hat on in Carleton Place!

Beckwith 1820 Census Lanark County–Who Do You Know?

 

Genealogy–

LOCHEAD FAMILY OF LANARK COUNTY , ONTARIO

Jonathon Francis and Margaret Carswell– From Scotland and Ireland to Pakenham

The Sad Tale of the Foley Family–Foley, Harper, Sly, Bowes & Elliott

PATERSON Families of Ramsay Township

James Stewart Ferguson– Lanark County Genealogy

 

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The Story Behind the Christmas Lights on Stonewood Drive

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The Story Behind the Christmas Lights on Stonewood Drive

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Many years ago our home on Lake Ave. East in Carleton Place was abuzz with Christmas lights. My late husband Angelo spared no expense to ‘entertain the neighbours’ during the festive season. Every year was a new plan, new lights, and my youngest son Perry was always by his side through snow, sleet, and bitter cold.

 

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In February of 2014, Angelo died of colon cancer, and when December of the same year  rolled around Perry decided to keep up his Father’s tradition at his own home off the 9th line in Beckwith. They called it Sophia’s Animated Christmas Light Show named after their 3 year-old daughter Sophia who was born 6 months after Angelo died.

 

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I guess I never understood why my family seemed to own half of the Carleton Place Canadian Tire and Home Depot Christmas light section when Angelo was alive, but when I saw that Perry used over 33,000 Christmas LED lights in his display this year I stopped getting “my tinsel in a tangle” and wished Perry’s Father could see how far our youngest son has progressed in becoming a Christmas Lighting Wizard. So, when you see the light display this year just off the 9th line, now you know the rest of the story– that it just isn’t another Christmas light show– it is a son’s love for his father reflected in each Christmas light.

 

Sophia’s Animated Christmas Light Show –267 Stonewood Drive, Carleton Place every night from 6-9pm (off the Beckwith 9th line)– It’s off Country Lane estates drive,,. there is no light so drive slowly and go right to the end of the road. You can’t miss it

33,000 Lights– The moment we’ve all been waiting for. . . . Sophia’s Animated Christmas Light Show will debut tonight ( Saturday December 9th ) at 6pm. The light show will be on EVERY night from 6-9. This year we have over 33,000 yes that’s right thirty three thousand LED bulbs. Don’t forget to tune into 88.3 Griswold FM.  Don’t be shy to stick around and listen to the roughly 15 holiday songs that are synchronized to the light show!! 

 

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In Memory of The Man Who Loved Christmas

 

 

 

 

 

Franktown Once Enlivened By Shouts of Lumberjacks–The word of Mrs. Frances Atkinson

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Franktown Once Enlivened By Shouts of Lumberjacks–The word of Mrs. Frances Atkinson

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Perth RememberedThreshing machine with a steam engine. C.1941 Franktown Ontario. C224-6. ©Queen’s Printer for Ontario

 

Present day visitors to the quiet but picturesque village of Frank­town, up in Beckwith township, if they were not already familiar with the historical background of the place, would have difficulty visualizing it as a once important and thriving center of industry and commerce.

            For living proof that it was such, even back in the thirties and for a long time afterwards, we have the word of Mrs. Frances Atkinson, ninety-eight-year-old, resident of Manotick, who was born and raised in Franktown at a period when settlers in the surrounding district were still experi­encing some of the trials and tribulations of pioneer life.

Busy Scenes

            In the middle fifties, according to Mrs. Atkinson, Franktown was a village of about one hundred and fifty inhabitants, boasting a main street which was a regular beehive of industry, particularly during the lumbering season. Those were the days when the little community was enlivened by the shouts and songs of the river­men and drivers of supply wagons who stopped there on their way up from Bytown to the McLachlin Brothers shanties. As many as one hundred teams would be seen in the hamlet at one time. During the period when        the Brockville and Ottawa railway was being constructed, Franktown district supplied thousands of railway ties. All this industry brought prosperity and busy times to the com­munity. The railway was run within s mile and a quarter of the village.

 

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            Mrs. Atkinson  recalls that in the middle fifties the village boasted two general stores kept by James Burrows and John G. Campbell. Mr. Burrows, besides running a large store, was pro­prietor of the Franktown Hotel, a hostelry which had graced the main street of the village from some time in the thirties. Ewen McEwen was postmaster and town clerk.

Many Blacksmiths

            The village had no fewer than four blacksmiths: Tom Allen, Martin Anderson, Tom Griffin and John Morris. There were also two doctors, three shoe­makers, two tailors, three coopers and two cabinet makers. William Moore conducted a tannery on the outskirts of the village. Mrs. Atkinson’s father, the late James Bowels, who came to Franktown district from the Old Country in the early thirties, was the leading carpenter and had a hand in the erection of many of the pioneer dwellings and commercial buildings.

            Long before Mrs. Atkinson saw the light of day in the little village of Franktown, the Beckwith pioneers had constructed a one room log schoolhouse a short dis­tance outside the village on the road leading to Richmond. That was where she and six brothers and sisters learned their three R’s. Two brothers. Harry and James, are still living and both residing in Western Canada.

 

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Newspaper Articles compiled by Grant McFarlane of Lanark.

 

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Image may contain: 5 people, people smilingPhoto from Franktown Gas and Grocery.. Ron Irvine is in the box.

If you have ever driven down Highway 15 to Smiths Falls you have no doubt seen Franktown Grocery and Gas. Not only is it the place to get yummy homemade food and those delicious butter tarts, but it is one of the foundations of Lanark County history. —

During World War ll the Canadian government campaign attempted to drum up support for the war among Canadians. They used war posters to recruit, to encourage wartime productivity and to raise money through Victory Bonds etc.

Canadian war posters were everywhere, colourful, and with a clear direct message. Produced and displayed in a variety of sizes on buses, billboards, in theatres, in stores and even on matchbox covers. Posters as a propaganda tool, had a direct clear message.

Obviously these young lads got the message from posters around the area. This 1940s photo was given to Franktown Grocery and Gas- No one knows names, but it was taken just outside the building.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

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The Mysterious World of Alexander Hastie Macfarlane of Franktown

The Franktown Inn

The Haunted Canoe from the Jock River

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

How Franktown Got Its Name

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Annual Potluck Coming!!! Next Lanark County Genealogical Society Meeting

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Annual Potluck Coming!!! Next Lanark County Genealogical Society Meeting

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Hosted by Lanark County Genealogical Society

Date/Time
Date(s) – December 9, 2017
12:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Location
Brunton Community Hall —ADMISSION is FREE

1702 9th Line, corner of Hwy 15 and 9th Line, Blacks Corners, Carleton Place ON.

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LANARK COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CHRISTMAS POT LUCK PARTY

Date/Time
Date(s) – December 9, 2017
12:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Location

Brunton Community Hall —ADMISSION is FREE

1702 9th Line, corner of Hwy 15 and 9th Line, Blacks Corners, Carleton Place ON.

 

Sharing categories of your contribution to the buffet tables including appetizers, main dishes, salads, desserts, non-alcoholic beverages and party goods  Please bring your own cutlery, dinner plate and beverage cup.

Annual General Meeting will follow Pot Luck.  Election for Board of Director Volunteers will take place.

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Back by popular demand,  guest speaker Randy Boswell.
If you missed Randy Bosswell’s presentation earlier this year you really must try to make it to this event.  Randy is an entertaining speaker.  He will be speaking on his historical finds in the old newspaper.  Randy has a wide-ranging career with the Ottawa Citizen and Postmedia News, where he covered city hall, had a business column, wrote a variety of feature stories, served as city editor and developed a national history beat, he became a full-time professor at Carleton University in 2012.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Lanark County Genealogical Society website–click here

Blast from the Past 2016 Potluck

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

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Potluck Don’ts?

Ye Olde Tea and Concert 1888 in Perth- LCGS Annual Potluck

McDonald’s Corners Party 1888-LCGS Potluck

Glen Tay Social 1887 LCGS Potluckunnamed (1)

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

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Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

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Adam Millar sent me this yesterday:

 

Hello, just wondering if you have ever seen historical records of a meteor in the Carleton Place area. My friend’s father told her of the huge hole he filled in his field and in the middle was a large meteorite (about the size of a small soccer ball – approx 60lbs).
Pretty sure she said his father had cursed the depression it left in his field. Farm is located on the highway (15 or 29 or whatever it is these days) and 7th line Beckwith. This would have been a huge fireball and likely very loud by the size of the meteorite. Thanks! -Adam
Well Adam, I found two instances but let’s ask our readers what they can remember and gather some comments. Here are my suggestions…
 May 26, 1957
November 1964

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

  relatedreading

Shadows of Beckwith Cemeteries

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Shadows of Beckwith Cemeteries

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Photos- Linda Seccaspina

If you take a walk around the Dewar Cemetery that is on Glenashton Rd, in Beckwith and the Kennedy Cemetery that lies across the road there is no other place that you can understand local history better. Cemeteries are full of unfilled dreams- countless echoes of ‘should have’ or ‘could have,’ but none more powerful than the shadows that speak at these two cemeteries in Beckwith.

 

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Alexander (Sandy) Archer’s headstone is probably the most unique with his medals of the 91st Regiment of Foot once cemented into the tombstone. Unfortunately someone saw fit to steal history and they are no longer there. These old burying sites contain names of those that brought their families to a new land and drove the forests back and made them fields. If you read the headstones carefully they tell of stories of who lived a full life, or those whose lives were cut off early, whether it was in a river or a deadly epidemic. Lack of skilled medical services and fevers and consumption– this in spite of a supposed sure proof remedy of crude molasses.

There are souls from The Derry, and family names such as: Garland, Kennedys, McEwans, McDiarmids, McLarens, Kidds, Leaches, Stewarts, Livingstones and many others now lie in the cold ground. In the Kennedy cemetery lies one of the earliest graves: the widow of Donald Ferguson, whose husband perished at the age of 90 while attempting to cut a road through Richmond in the bitter winter of 1818.

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Headstones marking the Kennedys: Donald, John and Robert who were great musicians that if you listen closely are still playing their bagpipes and instruments in the clan gatherings that surely still go on in the dead of night. The McDiarmid family with all their various spellings of their last name lie close to the Livingstones with a relationship from a marriage to the great David Livingstone, explorer of Africa.

 

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If you look closely towards the Dewar homestead near the cemetery you can still see the shadows of the people that came for miles carrying vessels and immerse the crook of the staff of St. Fillion into their waters that was supposed to provide miraculous powers. Sadness cowers on one particular headstone of a 24 year-old man who had cradled grain from morning until night and then died young becoming just another tragedy of Beckwith Township.

What happened to some we will never know- the many young mothers especially. There were those with difficult births with also an important predictor of infant mortality being breastfeeding. In areas where mothers didn’t breastfeed their babies, infant mortality rates soared, sometimes reaching thirty to forty percent. Beliefs about breastfeeding differed greatly between areas, sometimes even between the local villages. Even those who intended to breastfeed had a difficult time juggling this with their normal tasks which often required them to work in the fields all day. Or maybe loneliness in the wilderness was a burden too great for their physical and mental resources. The riddle of life in those days still remains unsolved and all true stories begin and end in cemeteries.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Beckwith 1820 Census Lanark County–Who Do You Know?

The Beckwith Highlanders and “Humpy Billy” Moore

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

“Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

John Goth–Tales of Beckwith Township

Beckwith –Settlers — Sir Robert the Bruce— and Migrating Turtles

What I Did on Beckwith Heritage Days – Alexander Stewart – Ballygiblin Heroe

The Now Complete Page Turning Story of the Beckwith Grandfather Clock

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

Desperately Seeking Information About the “Beckwith Copperhead Road”

Hobo’s and Tragedies in Beckwith

Beckwith Child Stolen by Natives

Take Me Home Beckwith Roads– Photo Essay

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Beckwith Fire Department 1965 Names Names Names

They Built this Township on….

 

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Looking for Information on the Mann Family of Blacks Corners

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Looking for Information on the Mann Family of Blacks Corners

 

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Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum has a request from the UK for information on the Mann family of Blacks Corners.

All Jennifer could find was this photo of Lorraine Mann from 1986 who was working at Leigh Instruments. The inquirer is asking about the 1970’s – Herbert John and his children (one of which was Lorraine).

Any info leave in the comment section or email Jennifer  at 613) 253-7013 or email at: ​cpbmuseum@outlook.com

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  05 Sep 1978, Tue,  [First Edition],  Page 43

 

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I found this online — a discussion on the Mann family of Black’s Corners

 

I have been trying to track down details of the children born to Herbert John and Irene Beryl Violet Mann whilst resident in Canada in the 1950s and 1960s for some time without success and am seeking any advice or help in how or where I can obtain the details.

Herbert John Mann was the son of Arthur Allen Mann and Ellen Frances Mary Mann and was born on the 22nd January 1920. He married Irene Beryl Violet Hibberd on the 10th September 1949 in Petersfield, Hampshire and they had two children Carolyn Leslie (b1951) and Hazel M (b1954) both born in Petersfield.

The family then emigrated to Canada and I understand that they went on to have a further seven or eight children and it is these children that I am trying to trace details of as I have no record of their names, dates/places of birth or any other details. The only other information I have on Herbert is details on a headstone commemorating his death in 1978 which is situated at St. James Anglican Church, Carleton Place Cemetery, Lanark Co., Ontario. The headstone reads:-

Herbert J. Mann
(Vidamour)
1920 – 1978
His Wife
Irene B. V. Hibberd
1928 –
In Loving Memory

Can anyone help?

 

Diana and woodchal many thanks for your informative responses to my posting and your contributions are much appreciated.

woodchal, the obituary you found has been of great help in enabling me to identify the names of the additional children of Herbert and Irene and answer a lot of questions. I am slightly confused by the reference in the obituary to Herbert being “also survived by four brothers and two sisters” for as far as I am aware Herbert was the only child of Arthur and Ellen Mann. I suppose the newspaper was only relying on information provided to them.

Diana, it’s interesting that you once lived at Black’s Corners and that it is such a tiny place – I must check it out as a matter of curiosity. I appreciate your advice and tips on sources to explore to try to ascertain further information and I certainly intend to check them out. I would also thank you for checking out some records so far and your proposal to contact some people you know and look forward to hearing from you further should that prove successful.

Having now become aware of the names of the further children of Herbert and Irene I can now take this a step further and try to find their dates and places of birth. As I am resident in the United Kingdom I am not aware of how the Canadian Registration system works. Is it possible to check indexes for births registered in the 1950s and 1960s as it is over here in England?

juantuss
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 11:52 pm

 

 

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Searching for Information: J.A. Stevenson and Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark

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