Tag Archives: beckwith

Have You Got Your Tickets Yet?? Hurry!!

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Have You Got Your Tickets Yet?? Hurry!!

 

 

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This special Beckwith Tour is being offered ONLY on September 9th 2017 and make sure you get your tickets fast and not be disappointed.

 

To get tickets for this tour for you and your friends please contact us at 613-793-6335 or email us at lcgspresident@gmail.com 

Tickets are $35 each!!

 

Since the founding of Beckwith, it has always been an area full of stories and history. The Lanark County Genealogical Society  invites you to share in those incredible tales of adventure, and pure Beckwith gumption. Whether you are a born and raised in Lanark County or brand new to the area, our in-depth, highly researched, expert led bus tour will have something for everyone.

Together with our guides you’ll talk history, see architecture from days gone by, and have the most fun you’ll ever have while learning. We will provide exciting and informative commentary of the area while conveniently stopping at  a few interesting sights for photo opportunities.

Lunch and guest speaker John McKenty plus entertainment!

 


LANARK COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY & BECKWITH TOWNSHIP HERITAGE BUS TOUR & BBQ
09/09/2017

Begins at the Beckwith Arena September 9– 9:30 am
1319 9th Line Beckwith
Carleton Place
BECKWITH TOWNSHIP HERITAGE BUS TOUR & BBQ Tickets on Sale Now!               $35             

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

 

 

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                   Our Bus Tour Corporate Sponsors

 

Beckwith Township Heritage Committee

British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa 

Probus Group of Perth

John McTavish Sponors

Beckwith Butcher

Foil Media

Sumac Loft

Beckwith Kitchen

John Barr Bus Lines

Virtual Office Services Plus

 

 

 

 

 

relatedreading

Lanark County Genealogical Society Beckwith or Bust Bus Tour “Sing a Long”

More Memories of The Beckwith McTavish House

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More Memories of The Beckwith McTavish House
 

 

Thanks goes to all of you who comment and send me great stories. Keep on sending them. This is from Jennifer Butler.

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Hi Linda:
David Butler and I purchased the McTavish house in 1973 from Don and Dot Miller. David passed away in February 1986, The photo shows his mother, Winifred, when she was visiting from England, with our son Martin. At the time of his death I had Martin 15, Adam 14 and Stephanie 12. I stayed on at the farm till 1993 and then sold it to a Gomez family. They lived there approx. 2 years and then sold it to the current owner and his late wife.
The medallion in the living room shows a beaver and as far as I know it is still there. (Author’s note– the current owner has advised me it is still there!!) The front room, parlour, has hand painted thistles in each of four corners and a plaster medallion in the centre. I held a large plate around the thistles so the ceiling could be painted without destroying the outer lines of the thistles and I hope they too are still there. Also inside the house the ceiling over the stairs had been lowered and the banister rail removed and all boxed in. From a house on Waverley Avenue in Ottawa I was able to purchase a similar railing so we could open the whole thing up again. The upstairs has a beautifully built curved wall which is typical I think in some of the stone homes of this era. I wonder if it was the same builder. We replaced the old wood windows and it seems to me there were 23. When they were measured and delivered they were all identical in size so fit any window in the house!!!
There was a summer kitchen on the back of the house but it wasn’t in good shape and the end was taken off and a large garage door replaced it. We took down the structure and built a new one with a basement. In hindsight I would have left the original structure there and in some fashion rebuilt the end portion which faced south. My husband felt we needed a modern basement. The original log barns unfortunately burned in January 1986 and I had the loafing barn built in the summer of 1986. The Gomez family built a horse ring. I hope this is of interest.
Jennifer Butler

Thank you card

Jennifer!!!!

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

 

 

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Samuel Patterson and Elizabeth Upton

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Samuel Patterson and Elizabeth Upton

 

Kemptville Advance November 1897

A lad who first saw the light of day in County Antrim, Ireland, in August, 1800, ventured across the raging Atlantic when only 17 years of age, unaccompanied by a parent or any near relative. When he put foot on Canadian soil he was a total stranger to all. Listen while we tell you w hat has been the outcome of this Irish lad.

His first abode was in Montreal where he worked for three years. Then he came into Upper Canada, passing through a place which he affirmed had but two houses, and which is now the capital of the Dominion. Through the latter place he proceeded on to the township of Beckwith where he remained for several years.

Later a young woman arrived from County Wexford in his own native land, and at the village of Richmond they were united in holy wedlock. The ups and downs of a wilderness life was their portion, but being well equipped with health and strength, perseverance and honesty, they were equal to all the trying emergencies and made a success of life.

Samuel Patterson and Elizabeth Upton were the happy young couple, and in 1842 they moved to Oxford township to spend the remainder of their days. To them were born ten children, five of whom are still living, whose names, ages, number of children and grandchildren we give below :

John Patterson, Kemptville, aged 69, 9 children, all living ; 16 grandchildren.

James Patterson, Oxford, aged 67; 12 children, 2 of whom are dead ; 9 grandchildren.

Benjamin Patterson, Burritt’s Rapids, aged 60; 14 children, 1 of whom is dead.

Samuel Patterson, Kemptville, aged 55; 11 children, 7 of whom are now dead.

Mrs, Robert Wiggins, Marlboro, aged 58; 4 children; 4 grandchildren. Those who were married but have since died are: Mary, wife of Robt. Conn, afterwards Mrs. Wm. Sanders, of Sarnia, 10 children. Robert, 2 children. Ann, wife of James Donnelly, Marlboro, 7 children, 13 grandchildren.

It will thus be seen that the descendants of this one Irish lad were 10 children, 69 grandchildren, 42 great-grandchildren, or a total of 121 people. When the Sickle of Time cut off their existence the grand sires were well advanced in years. Mrs. Patterson departed this life on Dec. 22, 1883, at the age of 82 years, and Mr. Patterson on Sept. 18, 1887, aged 87 years.—

 

 

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Pattersons-Kemptville Public Cemetery
Leeds & Grenville Co./Reg./Dist., Ontario CLICK HERE

4385-01 John PATTERSON, 30, cheese maker, Sarnia, Manotick, s/o Benjamin PATTERSON & Sarah Ann KIDD, married Tena McCORKELL, 20, Osgoode, same, d/o James McCORKELL & Bella FINDLEY, witn: William PATTERSON of Burritts Rapids & Nellie DAVIDSON of Manotick, 12 June 1901 at Brays Crossing

 

relatedreading

Genealogy Search– Looking for Pender Family Information

Looking for Information on the Kazy Family from Smiths Falls

Searching for Information: J.A. Stevenson and Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Searching for Information– Teddy Bears Made in Carleton Place?

Searching for Henry Beaufain and Augusta Grobe

Looking for Stories About the Hare Krishna in Carleton Place

Looking for Information on the Kazy Family from Smiths Falls

Looking for the Watson’s of Lanark County I Presume

 

 

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The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

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The House on a Beckwith Hill–The McTavish House and Ceiling Medallions

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1973 newspaper clipping. If you have a photo of the current home–please send it to me.

 

About a mile east from Black’s Corners a deed for this hillside property was given in 1824 to  John McTavish, but the home was not built until the 1870s. Foundation stones of the first dwelling which was either wood or log were found by former owner Donald Miller who owned the farm from 1950 until 1970 when it was sold to David Butler.

The McTavish tenure on the home lasted for upwards of 100 years when Hugh Timmins bought the property in 1932. After that former owners were: William J. Simpson, Elsie M. Lewis and Cecil Leslie Munro until Donald Miller took over.

Built similarly to two homes standing on a hill overlooking the countryside–warm mellow sandstone with gingerbread trim and a centre doorway that opens into a large hall welcomed family and friends for years. The highlight of this home was and hopefully still is— not only the exterior, but an interior ceiling medallion of a hand painted beaver with three maple leaves in his mouth crouching on a fallen log. There is no notation of who the artist is, and if it still is there I would love to see it.

 

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 Jayne Munro-Ouimet sent me this photo-Linda here is a recent photo of the house on the hill between the school and the park in Beckwith. Alex Sharpe is my cousin and quite a family history buff. His mum Ruth lived there. Some of the family members went to the one room school on the ninth line. Ruth’s brother Cecil Leslie Munro bought the farm from his parents. I will see if I can find out when my great uncle purchased the farm. One of the Hudson ladies lives on Glen Isle.

 

Ceiling Medallions

There used to be a rumour that plaster ceiling medallions  were put there to keep the soot from candliers or gasoliers from showing. Ceiling medallions were popular decorative elements in 19th-century middle and upper class homes. Throughout decorating history, even residential ceilings were embellished with colour, striping, cast-plaster ornaments, corner fans, borders, specialty papers, and murals.

Stencils also appeared early on, but the late 19th-century Victorian era was the heyday of the embellished ceiling. Faced with ceiling heights of 9′ or more on the main floor, decorators always considered the ceiling along with the walls They were popular during the 1830s through the 1890s. According to period advertisements, the ceiling medallions that were meant for the centre of the ceiling above hanging light fixtures were sometimes called “centres.”

I guess we will never know but today you can buy medallions in all home renovation stores, and even though my original plaster ones disappeared in our home fire of 1995 I still made sure that all ceiling medallions were replaced. I hand painted most of them and when I began to paint them the renovators thought it was funny, but by the last one they wouldn’t put one up unless I painted it. The last one I did was was the angel medallion in the living room.

 

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historicalnotes

Descendants of Donald and Mary McTAVISH

820 CENSUS BECKWITH TOWNSHIP

LANARK CO., ONT., CANADA

PAGE 1  OF 1

AS OF APRIL 1820

(Head of Household)

McTAVISH, Alexander:   (1)
McTAVISH, John: 1 female  (2)

Beckwith 1820 Census Lanark County–Who Do You Know?

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

 

 

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They Built this Township on….

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They Built this Township on….

 

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It’s hard being human, and our greatest weakness is sometimes spent in giving up– even though the most certain way to succeed is to keep trying. I had to reintroduce myself to a pen, which became my new stage of opportunity and strength, not being allowed to have my laptop in the hospital when I had my heart attacks. Actually it was the only option left for me, and most certainly the regular opportunities were kept away from me for health reasons.

The last time I wrote by hand was when we lost power a year ago in Lanark County and a loving tribute to the late Marvin MacPherson was composed by pen under the sole light of what was left in my solarium. We know that stress is one of the most underrated of all heart disease factors and I have no idea how I would have coped among the first Beckwith settlers and the different stress factors they encountered when they came to Lanark County.

In judging the healing of my poor old heart and those that got off a ship anticipating sunshine, flowers, and lollipops I think we both underestimated what would lay before us. They literally got screwed, and I’m going to be if I don’t smarten up. Trust me, there is no other way for me to put it into words other than being frank for the both of us.

We both wandered through towering trees where we couldn’t seem to see the sky and lost our footing in the thick murky swamps. The only difference between us is that some of those poor Beckwith settlers only got 35 acres out of 100, and I got the full 100. Imagine if they had been given a full chance like I had been given in life.

The main reason that these Beckwith settlers survived was because of their fortitude and ultra conservatism (that word was Glenn Lockwood’s not mine). We eclectic folks would not have stood a chance in those days as we are more interested in words and decorating than building up a strong base. The first settlers received no rich soil like their Upper Canada counterparts – only ground with stone patches greeted them and those conditions carried on for years. Even in the 1940’s local children coming home from school were still instructed to pick up a rock or two to clear the land. One only has to drive through the back farm roads to see piles of rock scattered throughout the area to understand the magnitude. It was necessary for these emigrants to change their awareness of what they thought life would be and realize each day was going to be a struggle from now on– like myself.

In spite of all the issues they spoke about Beckwith Township becoming a powerhouse solely for the reason that it was named after Sir Thomas Sidney Beckwith (1772-1831) who was at that time a Canadian rockstar. But, did he really have their best interests at heart, or was it just the undercurrents of “a foot race” to see which township could become the best? In the end who really ended up picking the right door to great wealth and prizes?

Settlers really didn’t win with all their hardships, the Indians lost big time and who really wins after what is called ‘an event’ – medical or physical? In the end, as with anything, it was nothing but: a lot of vocabulary, (‘c’mon folks let’s keep that loving feeling’ ) and make sure those rogue fighting Americans huddling in the woods near Brockville stay away.

Roads began to be built and squabbles about Franktown re: name changes etc. similar to Almonte began the daily rounds. The residents and powers to be finally got it through their heads that the Jock River was no hub for mills, and as with anything else, the new up and coming settlement of Morphy Falls (Carleton Place) was the place to be seen and heard.

By 1840 Franktown consisted of less than a dozen homes and Morphy Falls was on the way to be coming what Franktown had wanted to become. They say that great things come to those that work hard, and like fighting heart disease; these settlers came, raised hell, and spread awareness of who they were. They proved they were intelligent, capable and they stayed strong–no matter what the challenge. The Beckwith settlers kept their heads and their heart strong… like I will try too–because..

They built this township

They built Beckwith Township on rock…. and roll.

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

Lanark County Genealogical Society Beckwith or Bust Bus Tour “Sing a Long”

relatedreading

Taming of the Beckwith Shrew?

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Peter Cram of Beckwith Perth and High Street in Carleton Place

Beckwith One Room Schools– Leona Kidd

Beckwith 1820 Census Lanark County–Who Do You Know?

The Beckwith Highlanders and “Humpy Billy” Moore

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

“Teachester” Munro and the S.S. No. 9 Beckwith 11th Line East School

John Goth–Tales of Beckwith Township

Beckwith –Settlers — Sir Robert the Bruce— and Migrating Turtles

What I Did on Beckwith Heritage Days – Alexander Stewart – Ballygiblin Heroe

The Now Complete Page Turning Story of the Beckwith Grandfather Clock

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

Desperately Seeking Information About the “Beckwith Copperhead Road”

Hobo’s and Tragedies in Beckwith

Found on a Hill in Beckwith – Country Roads Take Me Home

 

 

 

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Till Death Do Us Part in Lanark County?

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Till Death Do Us Part in Lanark County?

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(stock photo of a “happy” wedding)

On Friday I wrote two stories about local women and their dilemmas coping with life in early Lanark County. When I was reading Glenn Lockwood’s book on Beckwith this weekend he wrote that it was basically religious social control that attempted to shield women from scorn in that early society.

Local women were controlled to such a point that young women such as Dorah Smith from Carleton Place, who arrived in Canada as a orphan had to obtain a guardian to give their consent before she could marry. Home became the centre of virtue and the proper life for women and it was a matter of fact that one must be married by twenty-one, and expected to begin having children immediately. Those that did not marry were regarded as social failures and treated with pity and contempt.

I have published many Perth Courier ads that were in newspapers of engagements gone sour, not only because they found their future partner undesirable, but more so that their future partner might be a little lighter in the purse. This factor might guarantee their quality of life might go down a notch or two, and that might be not advantageous to either party. Seeing passion, lust and love were way down on the food chain one has to wonder how happy some were in marriage.

It was duty first, owning land and happiness later, and children were not exempt in these rules. Disobedient son?  You might want to think once or twice about that as another brother might inherit what was supposed to be coming your way. What you owned became a status symbol, and homes and property remained in the family for generations. It was important until about the mid 1900s that property remain in the family. In fact,  land could not be sold or mortgaged unless it was within the family.

I often thought it was strange that when my Grandfather died he had strong stipulations in his will and my father continued the same tradition. When my Dad died neither my sister or I could only share his estate until she turned 31. Disputes between siblings separated families. Between 1828 and 1851 only a fraction of wills left property to the wife, and wills that left property to their wives would only remain valid as long as they remained unmarried.

Married women were barred from making contracts, appearing as witnesses in court, and initiating lawsuits. A wife’s legal personality was subsumed under her husband’s and all her property automatically became her husband’s. Even if she had her own land, her husband received the income from it as she had no legal rights. Similar to the  court case between  Beckwith residents Selina Drummond and her husband, law mostly removed itself from marital relations.

historicalnotes

Bathurst Courier, March, 1838

Notice, my wife Christian McQuarrie having left my bed and board for no just cause I hereby forbid any person from harboring her as I will pay no debits contracted by her on my account.  Daniel McQuarrie

Bathurst Courier, April 13, 1838

Notice, the subscriber forbids any person harboring or trusting his wife Betsey Markey (?) Mankey (?) Minielly, as she has left his bed and board without any just cause.  W. Minnielly, Elmsley

Bathurst Courier, June 1, 1838

 

Notice, Elizabeth Youll, my wife, having left my bed and board without any just cause, I prohibit any person from giving her credit in my name as I will not pay any such debt.  James Youll

Notice, Janet Anderson, my wife, having left my bed and board without any just cause, I prohibit any person from giving her credit in my name as I will not pay any such debt.  Joseph Anderson

Bathurst Courier August 9, 1839

Notice, my wife Bridget Connel Kenny having left my bed and board without any just cause I hereby forbid any person from harboring her on my account as I will pay no debts of her contracting after this date. John Kenny

As my wife Ann Horton McIntyre has left my bed and board for no just cause I hereby forbid any person from harboring her on my account as I will pay no debts contracted by her.  Peter McIntyre

Perth Courier, April 7, 1871

Caution—Whereas my wife, Elizabeth Ann Geary, has left my bed and board without any just cause or provocation, the public will hereby be cautioned against giving her any credit on my account.  George Geary, Bathurst

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

 

relatedreading

Taming of the Beckwith Shrew?

A Smith’s Falls “Frustrated Young Love’s Dream” Purdy vs Lenahan

 

Going to the Chapel? Hold on– Not so Fast!

Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

She Came Back! A Ghost Divorce Story

Slander You Say in Hopetown? Divorce in Rosetta?

Go Ask Alice – The Saga of a Personal Ad Divorce

 

 

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The Short but Illustrious Life of Dr. Daniel Muirhead

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McGill Montreal 1890

 

Daniel Muirhead entered McGill University in Montreal in 1885. In 1899 he graduated with an M.D. in medicine and became house surgeon at the Montreal General and Maternity Hospital 1889-1890. He served for sometime as a ship’s doctor and finally settled into private practice in Carleton Place.

On July 19, 1912 he journeyed with Norman Cram in his new top heavy Ford Runabout to visit with one of his regular patients. While attempting to pass a farmer hauling a load of hay on a small hill Dr. Dan’s front wheels caught in a rut on the rough North Gower road. His car toppled over and he was instantly killed at 46 years of age. (newspaper article says age 50)

To quote the Carleton Place Canadian from July 25, 1912:

“Quiet,skilled to an unusual degree, beloved by every person who ever met him, a valiant conqueror in a sick room–his loss is personal to all and a disaster to his profession, his town, and his country. His mother, sister and brother  W.J. survive him.”

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Jul 1912, Wed,  Page 3

 

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historicalnotes

Brother William married Mary Gillies and took over the family home from his mother who had moved to another house she owned close by. Later on she went to live with her daughter Mrs. R.E. Box. Bill, as he was known as owned and operated a hardware store on Bridge Street in Carleton Place. He was a gentlemen, a school trustee and a leading citizen of Carleton Place, and at age 19 he became checker champion of Manitoba in an open competition.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Jan 1940, Wed,  Page 2

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

The Saga of a James Street Home— Christina McEwen Muirhead

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

The Lost Gilles Family Ephemera Rescued