Tag Archives: Beckwitch

Would You Like Some Ice With that Drink?

Standard

Facebook Info Page

Mark your calendar for Sunday March 20th. Learn all about ice harvesting!

Sunday, March 20at 2 PM in EDT

Beckwith Township
1702 9th Line Beckwith, Carleton Place, Ontario K7C 3P2

ice

Photo from —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

In the early 1800s, one man saw dollar signs in frozen ponds. Frederic Tudor not only introduced the world to cold glasses of water on hot summer days, he created a thirst people never realized they had.

In 1805, two wealthy brothers from Boston were at a family picnic, enjoying the rare luxuries of cold beverages and ice cream. They joked about how their chilled refreshments would be the envy of all the colonists sweating in the West Indies. It was a passing remark, but it stuck with one of the brothers. Despite financial woes, Frederic persisted, and his ice business finally turned a profit in 1810. But a series of circumstances—including war, weather, and relatives needing bailouts—kept him from staying in the black for too long. Between 1809 and 1813, he landed in debtors’s prison three times and spent the rest of the time hiding from the sheriff.

iceaa

Photo from —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Despite financial woes, Frederic persisted, and his ice business finally turned a profit in 1810. But a series of circumstances—including war, weather, and relatives needing bailouts—kept him from staying in the black for too long. Between 1809 and 1813, he landed in debtors’s prison three times and spent the rest of the time hiding from the sheriff.

Frederic Tudor died in 1864, finally rich again. By that time, everyone with access to a frozen body of water was in on the action. Ice boomtowns sprouted along the Kennebec River in Maine, where farmers found year-round employment. The 1860s became the peak competitive period of American ice harvesting, and Tudor’s company prospered. Frederic Tudor would ship nearly 12,000 tons of ice halfway around the globe to become the “Ice King.”

clyde
Photo is ice cutting on the Clyde River

historicalnotes

In Lanark County harvesting ice was big business on Mississippi Lake. Large blocks of ice were cut, hauled home and stored in sawdust in an ice house. Whatever they chose to use for an ice house windows wold have to be boarded up and there was only one door to stop the ice from thawing. When they needed a block one would be hauled out with large thongs to keep your ice box cool. Gail Sheen-MacDonald from Carleton Place remembers the Kilfoyles had an ice house where all the cottagers in Innisville bought their ice. Joann Voyce said that Thoral Culbertson was their iceman in Carleton Place.

Farmers also used the ice surface of Mississippi Lake for their sleighs, hauling wood across the frozen waters to Carleton Place. The price of wood at one time was 4-5 dollars for a full cord, and some of farmers even bartered for groceries at a grocery store on High Street. Could this have been Mr. Campbell’s store?

Facebook Info Page

Mark your calendar for Sunday March 20th. Learn all about ice harvesting!

Sunday, March 20at 2 PM in EDT

Beckwith Township
1702 9th Line Beckwith, Carleton Place, Ontario K7C 3P2

f1548-s0393-cutting-ice-820

Photo-Google Image

 

Meet the Beckwitch at Swirlicious and Friends Annual Shopping Event!

Standard

Look what’s coming to Swirlicious and Friends Annual Shopping Event at 151 Bridge Street in Carleton Place on October 31! THIS ISN’T A CRAFT SHOW– THIS IS A SHOPPPPING EVENT:)

Yesterday I wrote about the Witches of Rochester Street. Most of that story was true, with the exception of Martha Stewart. As far as I know, Martha’s spatula has never hit the town lines. Last week however, I met the closest I will ever come to pioneer sustainable agriculture advocate Alice Waters. If you have never heard about her, it is because she is an icon in the United States.

Water’s philosophy is that cooking should be based on the finest and freshest seasonal ingredients that are produced sustainably and locally. She is a passionate advocate for a food economy that is “good, clean, and fair.” For nearly forty years, her restaurant, Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, Ca. has helped create a community of scores of local farmers and ranchers whose dedication to sustainable agriculture assures the restaurant a steady supply of fresh and pure ingredients.

Our local “Beckwitches” are actually comprised of husband and wife Penny and Greg Foster. They make their products together, and have even involved their children into their business. In addition to the soaps and hand made goods, they also branched out to garlic and heirloom vegetables. This year The Beckwitch grew glass gem corn, about 15 varieties of tomatoes, and all their own hot peppers for their infused salts.

Greg and Penny are Beaver leaders with 1st Beckwith Beavers. They are also giving their garden education to the Beaver colony as well. They already brought them to the dairy farm to give them a taste of farming and they even milked the cows.They have five children ages 2 through 18, and built their forever home at the front of the family dairy farm.

.

The Beckwitch’s concept was built on upcycling and being environmentally responsible. They try and buy local where they can, they re purpose as much as possible (chip bag pouches for instance) and want to promote edible propagation. They harvest and preserve most everything, dehydrate what they can’t and are known to gift their produce within the community to others.

This gifting concept led them to another idea – The “Free in CP – Gracious Giving and Receiving” FaceBook Group. They have almost 300 members as of today (all local to CP) and the group runs on kindness and kind words – and everything is free! It is a free cycling group with manners (and they do enforce it!). They have met so many individuals through their group and believe it is bringing the community together, not to mention reducing waste in our landfills. The Free in CP group has also provided Penny an avenue to request needed items for her Angel Gowns, where she makes angel gowns and wraps for babies born too soon or still from donated wedding gowns.

In 1996, Alice Water’s commitment to education led to the creation of The Edible Schoolyard at Berkeley’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Middle School: a one-acre garden, an adjacent kitchen-classroom, and an “eco-gastronomic” curriculum. By actively involving a thousand students in all aspects of the food cycle, The Edible Schoolyard is a model public education program that instills the knowledge and values we need to build a humane and sustainable future.
Her first school garden project was at St. Gregory’s school in Carleton Place where she helped 277 students make classroom gardens. There was themes like: pizza garden, herb garden and perennial garden, with the hopes that she can convince the schools to make outdoor gardens at each school.

This serves many purposes as it not only taught the students about edible propagation but high school students manage the gardens over the summer and earn their volunteer credits too. Jessica Pettes, (wife of Chef Dusty Pettes) graciously offered to assist her with the school garden projects.

If this wasn’t enough, Penny also works full time as a senior analyst with National Defence and a full time graduate student at the University of Ottawa. This is her fourth university degree. Her previous research pursuits were on a gendered perspective of mentoring women, and she is an academic and a published author of two peer reviewed articles on the subject. Her current research through the Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies at the University of Ottawa involves the gendered perspectives of entrepreneurial identity, to help contribute to women specific business research.

What do Greg and Penny do in their spare time? According to Penny they sleep sometimes!

The Beckwitch

522 9th Line East
Carleton Place, Ontario

Meet our very own Ladies Who Lunch Beckwitch

Standard

Yesterday I wrote about the Witches of Rochester Street. Most of that story was true, with the exception of Martha Stewart. As far as I know, Martha’s spatula has never hit the town lines. Last week however, I met the closest I will ever come to pioneer sustainable agriculture advocate Alice Waters. If you have never heard about her, it is because she is an icon in the United States.

Water’s philosophy is that cooking should be based on the finest and freshest seasonal ingredients that are produced sustainably and locally. She is a passionate advocate for a food economy that is “good, clean, and fair.” For nearly forty years, her restaurant, Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, Ca. has helped create a community of scores of local farmers and ranchers whose dedication to sustainable agriculture assures the restaurant a steady supply of fresh and pure ingredients.

Our local “Beckwitches” are actually comprised of husband and wife Penny and Greg Foster. They make their products together, and have even involved their children into their business. In addition to the soaps and hand made goods, they are now are branching out to garlic (planted last fall in the rain with baby in tow) and heirloom vegetables. This year The Beckwitch will be growing glass gem corn, about 15 varieties of tomatoes, and all their own hot peppers for their infused salts.

Greg and Penny are Beaver leaders with 1st Beckwith Beavers. They are also giving their garden education to the Beaver colony as well. They already brought them to the dairy farm to give them a taste of farming and they even milked the cows.They have five children ages 2 through 18, and built their forever home at the front of the family dairy farm.

.

The Beckwitch’s concept was built on upcycling and being environmentally responsible. They try and buy local where they can, they re purpose as much as possible (chip bag pouches for instance) and want to promote edible propagation. They harvest and preserve most everything, dehydrate what they can’t and are known to gift their produce within the community to others.

This gifting concept led them to another idea – The “Free in CP – Gracious Giving and Receiving” FaceBook Group. They have almost 300 members as of today (all local to CP) and the group runs on kindness and kind words – and everything is free! It is a free cycling group with manners (and they do enforce it!). They have met so many individuals through their group and believe it is bringing the community together, not to mention reducing waste in our landfills. The Free in CP group has also provided Penny an avenue to request needed items for her Angel Gowns, where she makes angel gowns and wraps for babies born too soon or still from donated wedding gowns.

In 1996, Alice Water’s commitment to education led to the creation of The Edible Schoolyard at Berkeley’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Middle School: a one-acre garden, an adjacent kitchen-classroom, and an “eco-gastronomic” curriculum. By actively involving a thousand students in all aspects of the food cycle, The Edible Schoolyard is a model public education program that instills the knowledge and values we need to build a humane and sustainable future.
Recently Penny has begun to receive donations for her own school garden projects. Her first school garden project will be at St. Gregory’s school in Carleton Place next month where she will help 277 students make classroom gardens. There will be themes like pizza garden, herb garden and perennial garden, with the hopes that she can convince the schools to make outdoor gardens at each school.

This serves many purposes as it will not only teach the students about edible propagation but high school students can manage the gardens over the summer and earn their volunteer credits too. Jessica Pettes, (wife of Chef Dusty Pettesfrom Ballygiblins) has graciously offered to assist her with the school garden projects.

If this wasn’t enough, Penny also works full time as a senior analyst with National Defence and a full time graduate student at the University of Ottawa. This is her fourth university degree. Her previous research pursuits were on a gendered perspective of mentoring women, and she is an academic and a published author of two peer reviewed articles on the subject. Her current research through the Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies at the University of Ottawa involves the gendered perspectives of entrepreneurial identity, to help contribute to women specific business research.

What do Greg and Penny do in their spare time? According to Penny they sleep sometimes!

The Beckwitch

522 9th Line East
Carleton Place, Ontario
(613) 508-1199
Penny Needs a few things for her  school garden project.. Please read here!
Photo of  Berkeley’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Middle School– I watched this grow and they had chickens too!

Seasonings of the Beckwitch

Standard

Yesterday I wrote about the Witches of Rochester Street. Most of that story was true, with the exception of Martha Stewart. As far as I know, Martha’s spatula has never hit the town lines. Last week however, I met the closest I will ever come to pioneer sustainable agriculture advocate Alice Waters. If you have never heard about her, it is because she is an icon in the United States.

Water’s philosophy is that cooking should be based on the finest and freshest seasonal ingredients that are produced sustainably and locally. She is a passionate advocate for a food economy that is “good, clean, and fair.” For nearly forty years, her restaurant, Chez Panisse, in Berkeley, Ca. has helped create a community of scores of local farmers and ranchers whose dedication to sustainable agriculture assures the restaurant a steady supply of fresh and pure ingredients.

Our local “Beckwitches” are actually comprised of husband and wife Penny and Greg Foster. They make their products together, and have even involved their children into their business. In addition to the soaps and hand made goods, they are now are branching out to garlic (planted last fall in the rain with baby in tow) and heirloom vegetables. This year The Beckwitch will be growing glass gem corn, about 15 varieties of tomatoes, and all their own hot peppers for their infused salts.

Greg and Penny are Beaver leaders with 1st Beckwith Beavers. They are also giving their garden education to the Beaver colony as well. They already brought them to the dairy farm to give them a taste of farming and they even milked the cows.They have five children ages 2 through 18, and built their forever home at the front of the family dairy farm.

.

The Beckwitch’s concept was built on upcycling and being environmentally responsible. They try and buy local where they can, they re purpose as much as possible (chip bag pouches for instance) and want to promote edible propagation. They harvest and preserve most everything, dehydrate what they can’t and are known to gift their produce within the community to others.

This gifting concept led them to another idea – The “Free in CP – Gracious Giving and Receiving” FaceBook Group. They have almost 300 members as of today (all local to CP) and the group runs on kindness and kind words – and everything is free! It is a free cycling group with manners (and they do enforce it!). They have met so many individuals through their group and believe it is bringing the community together, not to mention reducing waste in our landfills. The Free in CP group has also provided Penny an avenue to request needed items for her Angel Gowns, where she makes angel gowns and wraps for babies born too soon or still from donated wedding gowns.

In 1996, Alice Water’s commitment to education led to the creation of The Edible Schoolyard at Berkeley’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Middle School: a one-acre garden, an adjacent kitchen-classroom, and an “eco-gastronomic” curriculum. By actively involving a thousand students in all aspects of the food cycle, The Edible Schoolyard is a model public education program that instills the knowledge and values we need to build a humane and sustainable future.
Recently Penny has begun to receive donations for her own school garden projects. Her first school garden project will be at St. Gregory’s school in Carleton Place next month where she will help 277 students make classroom gardens. There will be themes like pizza garden, herb garden and perennial garden, with the hopes that she can convince the schools to make outdoor gardens at each school.

This serves many purposes as it will not only teach the students about edible propagation but high school students can manage the gardens over the summer and earn their volunteer credits too. Jessica Pettes, (wife of Chef Dusty Pettes from Ballygiblins) has graciously offered to assist her with the school garden projects.

If this wasn’t enough, Penny also works full time as a senior analyst with National Defence and a full time graduate student at the University of Ottawa. This is her fourth university degree. Her previous research pursuits were on a gendered perspective of mentoring women, and she is an academic and a published author of two peer reviewed articles on the subject. Her current research through the Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies at the University of Ottawa involves the gendered perspectives of entrepreneurial identity, to help contribute to women specific business research.

What do Greg and Penny do in their spare time? According to Penny they sleep sometimes!

The Beckwitch

522 9th Line East
Carleton Place, Ontario
(613) 508-1199
Penny Needs a few things for her  school garden project.. Please read here!
Photo of  Berkeley’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Middle School– I watched this grow and they had chickens too!

Carleton Place- The Happiest Damn Town in Lanark County

For the Facebook Group:


Tilting the Kilt, Vintage Whispers from Carleton Place by Linda Seccaspina is available at Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street, the Carleton Place Beckwith Museum in Carleton Place, Ontario and The Mississippi Valley Textile Mill in Almonte.  available on all Amazon sites (Canada, US, Europe) and Barnes and Noble