Tag Archives: barns

The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

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The Lowry Barn on Highway 29

Crystal Stanton asked a question .

Yesterday at 7:04 PM  · Looking for some history information. Biked from Almonte to Carleton Place along the railway. Anyone have information about the farmhouse with the barn roof that says “Jesus died for our sins”. I feel like there is a powerful story there…..

Maryanne Ryan

You should see what the other side says. YE MUST BE BORN AGAIN. I do have to say every time I drive bye, I praise God and Thank Jesus.

Christine AnnHeidi Parsons Lowry I would love to hear the history as well. I have wondered for 30 years. It definitely is a huge piece of home

Jocelyn Penley Wright— I went to school with Heather and Glenn Lowry who grew up on the farm. Heather told me the story but it’s been so long ago I’ve forgotten. I was in Grade 7 with her. David Scott was our teacher.

Kim MelansonI’d be curious to know as well. I was always told a few different stories growing up.

Heidi Parsons LowryThis is Neil Lowry, my wife is Heidi Parsons Lowry(the one posting)I am a proud nephew of the land owners of the property. To the best of my knowledge it was painted to show their strength in the faith in Christian values and God‘s word.I have reached out to my cousins who grew up there to add more insight and possibly story.Glenn LowryHeather Lowry-Hoogeveen💛

Julie Phillips-BowdenHeidi Parsons Lowry I would also love to know the story behind the sayings on the barn–it makes me think everytime I drive by—

Joy NoelI’ve always noticed these words, wondered about the owners and the story. I guessed it was a reminder to live a Christian life. 🙏🏻

Diane Larocque NoonanAs an 80-yr-old local, I remember that being there on the roof when I was very young…but I see you have had feedback from the Lowry family, who owned the property then and may well do today!

Heidi Parsons LowryMy husband says it has held up really well over 41 years, it was painted in 1980 and never touched up

Paul LeBlanc

Heidi Parsons Lowry I moved to Almonte, 14 at time and I recall it being painted. Was the green steel roof put on before before the literature was painted

Heidi Parsons LowryPaul LeBlanc I only married into the family in 2007, I called it the Jesus barn. Once I knew the devotion and kindness of my family, I feel very blessed to know them. Their contribution to the community is unmatched in my humble opinion.💛

Wendy Lowry

Paul LeBlanc hi Paul! Hope you are well. The roof was green steel and then the white letters were painted on. I recall my father saying that he was told that the white would fade very quickly because of the dark colour underneath. My mother does not remember hearing that though.

Paul LeBlanc

Wendy Lowry hi Wendy, great hearing from you, I’m doing great, hoping you as well. Thank you for the clarification and history on the barn roof. To be honest, I knew Lowrys owned the farm, but did not know it was your family 😉. Thanks for the history lesson

Allison Kerry MacKinnonHeidi Parsons Lowry, my husband said that Mr. Lowry once told him it was “miracle” paint

Christine AnnAllison Kerry MacKinnon that’s amazing! It certainly is miracle paint. Still looks awesome

Lantern Hill Farm

The Lowrys are very strong Christians and not afraid of shouting it from the roof tops!!No pun intended.

Wendy Lowry

Crystal Stanton thank you for bringing up this subject. My father David Lowry was the owner of the barn and paid to have those words painted on the roof. Sadly he has since passed away but those words have remained as was mentioned since 1980 and it has never been repainted or touched up.My father said that God had given him a vision of how painting the scripture on that roof would reach many, many people as at that time it would be seen if you were driving past, were in a plane flying over or on a train.He was a Christian man and an evangelist of sorts. In that he wanted to share the gospel (the good news) of God with everyone. Basically he wanted everyone to know that God loves them. Loves them enough that Jesus died on the cross for them. Jesus died to pay the cost of all of our sins and he wants us to be with him forever.The words painted on that barn were not meant to be a threat but to tell of the gift that God offers and wants for all of us.He would be pleased to know that the vision God gave him all those years ago still stands true today just like the word of God.

Julie-Ann MortonWendy Lowry thank you for sharing. God bless you as your godly heritage has blessed many throughout the years. No one this side of heaven will know the impact that barn has had on people

Tina BrianI remember as a kid driving past this on our trips up this way. I thought oh wow so nice that they keep it freshened up…. amazing that it’s never been touched up

Maureen EsserysHi before we emigrated to Canada we came on vacation many many times. When we saw that roof we knew we were going to land shortly. My son was 9 years old and used to say not long now mum xxx

2021

Almonte’s agricultural community remembers farming, community leader Allan Lowry

NEWS FEB 23, 2021 BY ASHLEY KULP  CARLETON PLACE ALMONTE CANADIAN GAZETTE

Allan Lowry

The Lanark County agricultural community is mourning the loss of Allan Lowry, who passed away Feb. 14 at the age of 67. – Lowry family photo

A kind and humble man with a passion for agriculture is how the Mississippi Mills community is remembering Allan Lowry.

The lifelong farmer passed away at age 67 on Feb. 14. In recognition of the community leader, flags at the Mississippi Mills administration office were lowered to half-mast Feb. 16.

Agriculture was in Allan’s blood, having grown up on Penlow Farms, the family’s 100-acre dairy operation just outside of Almonte. It was established by his parents, Dorothy (Penman) and Bert Lowry.

“Our dad did well in school and was involved in 4-H and Junior Farmers’ (Association of Ontario) in his youth,” noted daughter Christa and current Mayor of Mississippi Mills, as she spoke about her father at his Feb. 20 celebration of life at Almonte United Church. “He was at a 4-H event where he and our mom met, in fact.”

He married Donna (Sweeney) in 1974, and in 1978 began expanding their family with children, Christa, Julie, Brad (Lindsay Cavanagh) and Leanna. That same year, he and Donna became partners in Penlow Farms and helped add a cash crop operation to the farm.

“Our dad was devoted to Penlow Farms, building internationally recognized Holstein bloodlines, developing successful cash crop operations, expanding the farm acreage and constantly seeking new and progressive technologies, science or management techniques to improve,” Christa said.

Donna and Allan took over the farm in 1994, with the help of their children. Today, Brad and wife Lindsay are poised as the next generation to oversee it.

Almonte’s agricultural community remembers farming, community leader Allan Lowry

NEWS FEB 23, 2021 BY ASHLEY KULP  CARLETON PLACE ALMONTE CANADIAN GAZETTE

Allan Lowry

The Lanark County agricultural community is mourning the loss of Allan Lowry, who passed away Feb. 14 at the age of 67. – Lowry family photo

Penlow Farms earned a Master Breeder shield at the Holstein Canada convention in Manitoba in 2012.

A kind and humble man with a passion for agriculture is how the Mississippi Mills community is remembering Allan Lowry.

The lifelong farmer passed away at age 67 on Feb. 14. In recognition of the community leader, flags at the Mississippi Mills administration office were lowered to half-mast Feb. 16.

Agriculture was in Allan’s blood, having grown up on Penlow Farms, the family’s 100-acre dairy operation just outside of Almonte. It was established by his parents, Dorothy (Penman) and Bert Lowry.

“Our dad did well in school and was involved in 4-H and Junior Farmers’ (Association of Ontario) in his youth,” noted daughter Christa and current Mayor of Mississippi Mills, as she spoke about her father at his Feb. 20 celebration of life at Almonte United Church. “He was at a 4-H event where he and our mom met, in fact.”

He married Donna (Sweeney) in 1974, and in 1978 began expanding their family with children, Christa, Julie, Brad (Lindsay Cavanagh) and Leanna. That same year, he and Donna became partners in Penlow Farms and helped add a cash crop operation to the farm.

“Our dad was devoted to Penlow Farms, building internationally recognized Holstein bloodlines, developing successful cash crop operations, expanding the farm acreage and constantly seeking new and progressive technologies, science or management techniques to improve,” Christa said.

Donna and Allan took over the farm in 1994, with the help of their children. Today, Brad and wife Lindsay are poised as the next generation to oversee it.

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Pictured, back row, from left: Brad, Christa, Leanna and Julie. Middle row: Donna and Allan Lowry. Front row: Dorothy and Bert Lowry. – Lowry family photo

She looked back fondly on a 2012 family trip to Brandon, Man. where Penlow Farms was recognized with a Master Breeder shield at the Holstein Canada convention.

“What a true testament to the breeding program our dad encouraged, balancing production and type,” Christa said.

A new barn with a state-of-the-art robotic milker, one of the area’s first, was added in 2015.

Allan served on countless boards and committees, including Lanark Mutual Insurance, Auld Kirk Cemetery, Mississippi Mills’ economic development and agricultural committees, to name a few. He also invested a great deal of time as a member of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, Ontario Soil and Crops Association and Lanark Holstein Club.

He was known for his practicality, sharp mind, big heart and graciousness. Those are attributes his lifelong friend Merv Hilliard, says fit him to a T.

“He always said you have to love what you do or you shouldn’t do it,” he said. “He was always willing to talk to new people and he made new friendships wherever he went. He was very involved in a lot of organizations and he thrived in it.”

He last spoke with his friend on the morning he went into hospital, Feb. 13.

“I knew he wasn’t well, but he was looking forward to spring coming and to being able to get out and have a visit on the front porch,” he said. “There are friendships and then there are loyal friendships and I would put Allan in that category. He’ll be sadly missed.” Ashley Kulp click

Related reading

So What are the Mysterious “diamond cross” cut-outs seen on barns in Lanark County?

Donald Lowry 1976

Second Lieut. H. A. Powell, to Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Lowry, of Pakenham — Steam in WW1

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Things About Bill Lowry 1998

The Wilkie Lowry House on Highway 29

Memories and Poetry of George Lowry

The Malloch Barn and Other Things

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The Malloch Barn and Other Things
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Hi Linda. This is the barn at our Malloch family farm…The barn was built by Dan Malloch my great grandfather in 1909. This is the first major repair ever done on the barn since my great grandfather had the barn built. Check out the thick stone walls. Blake is repairing the corner of the barn his great great grandfather had built. I love history. –Glenda Mahoney
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All Photos Glenda Mahoney
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historicalnotes
Anybody who is familiar with the ways of the Lanark County farmer knows that they set a high value upon their cattle. In fact, it frequently happens that sometimes the cattle are better cared for than the members of the farmer’s family.
If anything goes wrong with the herd, or if the milk sours or the butter will not come, it is set down as a case of “hexeri” and the services of ‘one that knows” are called in. The latter prescribes a charm to be nailed above the stable door, and, in fact, treats the cattle that have been “hexed” just as he does his human patient. In driving through the country districts it is not an unusual sight to observe these charms above the entrance to the cow stable. –The Appeal- 1900

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

Ramsay Barn Fire-Why Were the Tracks on Fire?

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Ramsay Barn Fire-Why Were the Tracks on Fire?

 

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Photo–Wired

Carleton Place Herald February 1917

Barns Burned in Ramsay

A red glow in the northern sky last Friday night gave indication of a large fire in the of direction, of Almonte. Information later gave the details of the destruction of the barns of Mr. T . S . Arthur, on the 9th line of Ramsay, on the former Hawkins farm.

From what can be learned the fire originated from the C .P .R . tracks. Mr. Arthur was out an hour before and as he thought, already had extinguished a fire on the track. It is now thought that the sparks had got to the buildings before the fire was extinguished and were smouldering for some time. In the  barns were a number of implements, so that the loss will be quite a heavy one, and much sympathy is expressed for the owner for his loss.

So why were the tracks on fire?

When the cold hits, it isn’t the trains that have trouble. It’s the switches that direct the cars between tracks that freeze, and when a switch fails, it can compromise an entire line. To keep the switches functioning, some railways still use the centuries-old method of burning kerosene or natural gas to keep everything running.

Yes, there are more civilized methods now, like hot air blowers that clear debris, but in an era of self-driving cars and other modern marvels, simply using fire to melt ice has a quaint retro feel to it and in some places they still do it.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

 In 1821 another group of emigrants arrived from the British Isles. Along the 9th line where Highway 29 now runs, the following took up 100 acres each John Donaghue, Thomas and Robert Mansell, William Lummox, Catin Willis and William Hawkins. On the first, second and third concessions of Ramsay were Thomas Forster, Alex Leary, James Smith, Fred DeLisle, Patrick McDermott, Arthur Nugent, George Blackburn, Stephen Young, Charles Sterne, William Chapman, John McKerecher. Along the sixth line settled John and Donald Joseph McLean, Joseph Hewitt, and John Dobson. Late in the summer of  1821 the Lanark Society sponsored settlers began arriving in Ramsay. —click here..

 

Just got a comment on the Ramsay Barn Fire-Why Were the Tracks on Fire? from Robert Hawkins-Feduke…
 
Thanks again Linda, and by the way, under historical notes, the Hawkins farm (Wexford Farm), settled by William Hawkins, in 1821 is still in the family, 196 years! How cool is that?

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Jul 1904, Mon,  Page 1

 

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

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He Fired the Barn! The Orphans of Carleton Place

Strange Coincidences– The Duncan Fire

The Bush Fires of Darling Township

Henry Lang and His Lanark County Magic Barn?

Let’s Raise a Barn

So What are the Mysterious “diamond cross” cut-outs seen on barns in Lanark County?

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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Let’s Raise a Barn

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Let’s Raise a Barn

 

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There was information written on the back of this photo but someone erased it. Still visible is: “Peter McTavish, Elmsley, Ont.” and “Cameron McTavish, Elmsley, Ont.”–his photo was found in an antique store in Perth, Ontario, in December, 2015. Brothers, Cameron & Peter McTavish appear in North Elmsley Township in the 1901 census, ages eleven and five, respectivley, but there is no proof they are in this photo (the names are a good indication, but not proof). Charles Dobie

 

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Barn raising, on the farm of J.D.Moodie, Scotch Line, June 30, 1886. On beam at top, sitting: Jas. Ferrier, John Ferrier Sr., John Palmer, Jas. Robinson. Standing: Robt. McLaren, Abram Ferrier Jr., Harry Acheson, Isaac Ferrier, Alex Moodie, Robt. Strong. Sitting: John McDonald, Albert Wilson, Home Boy (Name not known), Alex Dodds, Jas. D. Allan, Robert Brash, Jas. Wilson. Sitting on beam beside ladder: Jas Cameron, Blacksmith, Fallbrook. Middle beam, standing at left: Andy Turnbull, John Ferrier. Middle beam, sitting at right: R. Davidson, Abe Moodie, Frank Allan Sr., name unknown. Standing on Barn Floor: Geo. Farnell (ed. sitting on chair), Jas. Fraser, Abraham Ferrier Sr., Mac Ferrier, Robt. Allan, Rathwell, Manitoba, Robt. Moodie, Frank Allan Jr., Jas. Moodie, John Allan, Od. Consitt, Chas. Walker, John Armour. Between rows: Wm. Acheson, John Moodie. Sitting on Gangway: T.A. Moodie, John McGowan, Matt Balderson, Issac Ferrier Sr., Barney Hogan, Alex Abercrombie, Sloan (first name unknown). Sitting far right: Jas. Moodie Sr., Wm. Cowie. Photo from Perth Remembered

 

 

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Photo from Bytown or Bust

 

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In search of my McCreary-Magee-McGee Codd/Code Ancestors  
in Lanark County, Ontario, Canada

 

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August 9 1907–Mr. T. C. Arthur, Ramsay, had a successful “barn raising” last Thursday.
Some 55 men assisted in putting up the framework, the building being a very large modern, structure.

During that period new barns were erected everywhere, and, as saw-mills would not pay over twenty-five cents for the two first logs from a pine tree, the best of timber went into these. Barn-raisings were community events and whiskey was in abundant supply. I have seen half-tipsy men swarming all over the skeleton structures, but never saw a serious accident. At these raisings, the barns were christened like a ship at a launching, but whiskey instead of wine was used at the ceremony. Once, at a raising near Ancaster, I saw a man, bottle in hand, run up the peak where two rafters joined. There, balancing on one foot, he sang out:

“It is a good framing
And shal] get a good naming.
What shall the naming be?”

“When the prearranged name was shouted back the man on the rafters so declared it as he cast the bottle to the ground. Was the bottle broken? No, indeed! As it contained the best liquor supplied at the raising, care was taken to see that it fell on soft ground, and the moment it fell it was surrounded by a crowd of men, still thirsty despite the liberal libations already supplied.”

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (US

 relatedreading
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Did We Find Henry Lang’s Barn?

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Did We Find Henry Lang’s Barn?
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 Photo Linda Seccaspina
Almonte Gazette September 2, 1898–That barn of Mr. Henry Lang’s will be an interesting one from the fact that its material has been mostly furnished by two  landmarks Mr Caldwell’s old sawmill and Mr. Cannnon’s shingle mill on the shore of the bay below the town—both, as well as the timber slides, having become relics and reminders to the present generation that in bygone years Almonte was a live lumbering centre.  From Henry Lang and His Lanark County Magic Barn?

Karen Prytula used Google maps,  and looked at the properties at 1218 Old Almonte Rd, and 1130 Old Almonte Rd.

1218 has old logs on the property dismantled from something. The house looks to me that it is probably of log – covered over.
1130 is quite a heritage property as I can see old gates no longer used, and fence posts that were once pretty in their day. This property has two large outbuildings that might be the Lang barn.
Author’s Note
So is it? I drove by today and noticed the original frame house was weathered and very old as Karen said and some if it is being covered by new clapboard. Yes, there were two large out buildings but the foliage prohibited me from getting a good glance and I stop at trespassing on someone’s private property.
So now I am asking my readers if anyone knows anything about this property so that we can finally save this mystery.

 

 

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Drive By Photo Linda Seccaspina– 1130 Old Almonte Road–Notice how clapboard is being put over the original frame house.

 

Notes from Karen Prytula LCGS

Below are my notes for lot 14E, Concession X, Ramsay Township. This information was gathered up between 2001 and 2005, and is probably from two different sources, which I did not record.

“Lot 14E – Arthur Lang settled here in 1821.  He would have erected a shack along the bank of the Mississippi River.  Other records indicate he was on the west side of the lot which would have bordered the east side of River.  Arthur arrived here with his wife and six children.  He actually kept a diary of the journey.  His wife and children remained in the village of Lanark, with all the other settlers wives and children, while he and the other men ventured even further to find their lot and erect a shelter or shanty.  By November 7th of that year Arthur was able to pick up his family at Lanark and bring them to the shanty they were going to winter in.  He became one of the first school teachers in the township, teaching his pupils from his home.  No doubt his children were one half of the class! One of his sons, John, grew up to have a sawmill business in Almonte. 

Some men could not bear to leave their families in the Village of Lanark for a couple more months.  So the men boated them down the rivers until they arrived at Almonte, then built wigwams for them to stay in until the men had built homes on the tracts of  land they received.

 As anyone can tell by now this journey was harrowing and dangerous.  Countless times the pioneers encountered Indians.  Most were friendly.  Those that werent usually kept to themselves.  Most of these Indians would never have met a white person before, and most white people had never seen an Indian before, let alone be able to communicate with one another!  For the most part, there was a lot of staring going on with some gestures.  It is reported that one pioneer actually offered and Indian a loaf of bread.    He ignored the offer but saw that the newcomers were not an immediate threat and walked off.  Had he even seen a loaf of bread before?!” —

Karen Prytula LCGS

 

 

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

What is this? From Karen Prytula– LCGS

 Henry Lang and His Lanark County Magic Barn?

The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

So What are the Mysterious “diamond cross” cut-outs seen on barns in Lanark County?

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herb garden barn

 

In 2008 nominations for the Seven Wonders of Lanark  County poured in such as the beautiful Inge-Va house in Perth, the exquisite Mill of Kintail in Mississippi Mills, the stunning “Preaching Rock” in Lanark Highlands and the mysterious “diamond cross” cut-outs (folk art) seen on historic barns in Lanark County.

Diamond Cross Cut-Outs? Do we have Amish in Lanark County?  All our local barns were formed of square or rectangular cribs or pens made of rough hewn logs laid horizontally and held together by notched corners. As farms gradually expanded and more barn space was necessary small specialized buildings were attached.

 

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So what were these openings for? Well, putting small decorative openings high up were viewed simply as owl and air ventilation holes however, the artistic, decorative quality seemed to contradict with a barn or a farm’s practical existence and function. Traditionally called owl holes, and they also offer nesting openings for barn swallows.  Barns were typically the largest investment and structure on a farm often costing more than the house to construct The Catholic German immigrants began this tradition not only as ventilation but to protect the barns from fire.

The cut-outs seem to serve practical and spiritual purposes. It was passed down from generation to generation during an era when our forefathers had a deep respect for tradition. It might have been something the team of builders just did and didn’t know why. But, I believe they were not simply owl/bird access or ventilation holes,  but were regarded as protective symbols as well.

RELATED READING

THE SEVEN WONDERS OF LANARK COUNTY

The Preaching Rock of Lanark County

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

So Where Does the Water come from Under my House?

So What was in That Old Alligator Hole Anyways in Carleton Place?

Lanark Mormons and Mormon Tree?

One of the 7 Wonders in Carleton Place

Where Was Meyers Cave?