Tag Archives: banshees

Banshees on the March Road 1871

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Banshees on the March Road 1871

Did Peter Gorman Really See a “Banshee” on the March Road in 1871?

Remarkable Story Told by a Respected Resident of the Third Line of March. Grandmother Died Three Day After the “Appearance.”

Mr. Peter Gorman, a respected whose grandfather came to these parts in 1848 tells of a weird experience which he (Peter) had in 1871 when living on the first concession of Torbolton. One night when coming from the barn to the house, he heard a sort of wailing cry close to the nearest corner of the house.

He looked in the direction of the noise and was surprised to see a spectre in the air. The spectre was about eight feet from the ground. Whatever it was had a face, but no feet. It was like a person who was wearing a sheet which was longer than his or her body. The spectre was about the size of the average woman.

The substance was impalpable, yet could not be seen through. The robe or sheet or body, or whatever it was had a sort of sheen. The spectre seemed to float in the air, but was stationary. The thing was uttering little whining cries or sobs. The noise was not loud, but could be easily heard fifty feet away.

As Mr. Gorman, then a young man, regarded it in wonder, the thing suddenly vanished. The first thing that struck Mr. Gorman was that he had been looking at and hearing a “banshee.” Mr. Gorman had heard some of the old people tell about the banshees that used to be heard, and sometimes seem in Ireland, but he had never heard one of them claim that they had ever known of a banshee being seen in Canada.

After the “banshee” or whatever it was had disappeared, Mr. Gorman went into the house and told his story, but was roundly laughed at. He was told there were no banshees in this country and that he had imagined what he had told. Mr. Gorman took the laughing in good part, but replied that they could laugh all they wanted to, but just the same he had seen and heard what he had seen and heard.

Just three days later, Mr. Gorman’s grandmother died. After that the people treated his story with respect. The old lady who had died had been very fond of young Peter. Mr. Gorman says he never had a supernatural experience before or since and he has no explanations to offer. If what he saw and heard was a banshee, then he is probably the only man who ever saw or heard one in Canada. Mr. Gorman says he presents the story for what it is worth. He will vouch for the facts as a resident of the third line of March.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada08 Aug 1892, Mon  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa JournalOttawa, Ontario, Canada12 Mar 1886, Fri  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada20 Sep 1875, Mon  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROMOttawa Daily CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada20 Sep 1875, Mon  •  Page 4

Banshees and Steamships

Irish Immigrant Girls Were in Demand Despite Hard Times

From Dublin to Drummond- Mahon Family Reunion — Series –Part 5 — Kevin Dooley and Irish Immigration

Banshees and Steamships

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Banshees and Steamships
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he Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Oct 1933, Sat  •  Page 2

So why was the boat called The Banshee? I think this story might have a lot to do with it.

The Banshee of Kingston Mills

A banshee, or Bean Sidhe, is a fairy from Irish folklore whose scream was an omen of death. Her thin scream is referred to as “caoine,” which translates to “keening.” It is said that a banshee’s cry predicts the death of a member of one of Ireland’s five major families: the O’Grady’s, the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors or the Kavanaghs.

Over time as families blended, it was said that most Irish families had their own banshee. It is also said that the banshees followed their families as they emigrated from Ireland to other places across the globe, though some stayed behind to grieve at the original family estate.

It is believed they were based on an old Irish tradition where women would sing a lament to signify one’s passing. This too was referred to as keening. As many keeners accepted alcohol as payment, which the church frowned upon, many have speculated it was these keeners who were punished in the eyes of God and were forced to become banshees. Another factor that likely contributed to the superstitious legend is the cry of the barn owl. In ancient battles, owls would screech and take flight if they noticed an army approaching, which would forewarn the defending army.

In June 1930, on a hot summer day, visitors to Kingston Mills Lock were alarmed when they heard banshees groaning and sobbing in the marsh. A tale spread by the community has grown and spread until some residents fear for the marshes around the Kingston locks. The matter remained hearsay until a local newspaper published a story. Since then calls have poured in reporting sights of the spectre.

These people are convinced they saw something and people claiming sight have fainted immediately. The sounds happen when the sun is high and the marsh is full of water. Many people heard the sounds over the years but no one could find anything that caused them.

An older Carleton Place resident told me they made several fires when they stayed overnight to protect them from the banshees in the woods.There have been several reported banshee sightings, but it is said that if a banshee becomes aware of a human’s presence watching her, she will disappear into a cloud of mist. When she does, it is accompanied by a fluttering sound like a bird flapping its wings.

So are there Banshees? This story is from the Frontenac Arch Biosphere

The legend of the Banshee started when the Rideau Canal was being built and Irish people settled near the lock. They brought with them supernatural beliefs and the ‘Bean-Sidhe’ who mourns over the death of a good or holy person was one of those beliefs.

It is possible the marsh clay dried up around the cattail roots and the air burst out of them causing groaning noises.

read more

Fresh Fairy Foot Marks Earth On a Charcoal Pit Westport Perth –McNamee

Faeries on the Malloch Farm

The Faeries of McArthur Island- Dedicated to the Bagg Children

Oddities — Lanark County Puffball Mushrooms

Beware of the Lanark County Fairy Rings

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he Buffalo Commercial
Buffalo, New York
13 Mar 1861, Wed  •  Page 3
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The Buffalo Commercial
Buffalo, New York
12 Aug 1864, Fri  •  Page 3
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Buffalo Morning Express and Illustrated Buffalo Express
Buffalo, New York
13 Sep 1872, Fri  •  Page 3

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Dec 1914, Tue  •  Page 6

The Banshee of Kingston Mills

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Photo from www.rideau-info.com

The Banshee of Kingston Mills

A banshee, or Bean Sidhe, is a fairy from Irish folklore whose scream was an omen of death. Her thin scream is referred to as “caoine,” which translates to “keening.” It is said that a banshee’s cry predicts the death of a member of one of Ireland’s five major families: the O’Grady’s, the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors or the Kavanaghs.

Over time as families blended, it was said that most Irish families had their own banshee. It is also said that the banshees followed their families as they emigrated from Ireland to other places across the globe, though some stayed behind to grieve at the original family estate.

It is believed they were based on an old Irish tradition where women would sing a lament to signify one’s passing. This too was referred to as keening. As many keeners accepted alcohol as payment, which the church frowned upon, many have speculated it was these keeners who were punished in the eyes of God and were forced to become banshees. Another factor that likely contributed to the superstitious legend is the cry of the barn owl. In ancient battles, owls would screech and take flight if they noticed an army approaching, which would forewarn the defending army.

banshee

Photo from www.messagetoeagle.com

 

In June 1930, on a hot summer day, visitors to Kingston Mills Lock were alarmed when they heard banshees groaning and sobbing in the marsh. A tale spread by the community has grown and spread until some residents fear for the marshes around the Kingston locks. The matter remained hearsay until a local newspaper published a story. Since then calls have poured in reporting sights of the spectre.

These people are convinced they saw something and people claiming sight have fainted immediately. The sounds happen when the sun is high and the marsh is full of water. Many people heard the sounds over the years but no one could find anything that caused them.

An older Carleton Place resident told me they made several fires when they stayed overnight to protect them from the banshees in the woods.There have been several reported banshee sightings, but it is said that if a banshee becomes aware of a human’s presence watching her, she will disappear into a cloud of mist. When she does, it is accompanied by a fluttering sound like a bird flapping its wings.

So are there Banshees? This story is from the Frontenac Arch Biosphere

The legend of the Banshee started when the Rideau Canal was being built and Irish people settled near the lock. They brought with them supernatural beliefs and the ‘Bean-Sidhe’ who mourns over the death of a good or holy person was one of those beliefs.

It is possible the marsh clay dried up around the cattail roots and the air burst out of them causing groaning noises.

So are all those noises they hearing all over Canada and the US really banshees?

 

Audio expert purports to debunk ‘strange noises’ mystery

 

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The Witch of Plum Hollow – Carleton Place Grandmother