Tag Archives: balderson

Donna Cameron Moon Photo– 1945– Balderson– Donna McFarlane

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Donna Cameron Moon Photo– 1945– Balderson– Donna McFarlane
This calender has picture of Donna Cameron Moon and her brother Ken children of Donald Cameron and Anna Mcdougald of Balderson calender is intact and is 1945- Donna McFarlane

CAMERON, Kenneth John

Kenneth John Cameron beloved husband of Linda Marilyn Smith died sudden­ly at home on October 4th 1975. Ken, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cam­eron, Balderson, Ont., was born on August 8th, 1936 He attended public school in McDonald’s Corners and high school in Lanark. After leaving school, Ken farmed with his father at Balderson. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cameron, Balderson, two brothers, Doug of Balderson and Brian of Napanee, and his sister Donna (Mrs. Edward Moon), of Crosby. Ken and Linda were married in St. Paul’s United Church, Perth, on July 13 1963. They happily resided a Balderson for five years and then bought their home a 99 Dufferin Road when they resided for the next seven years. They were blessed with two children, Philip and Kelly Ann. Ken was a foreman at the Heritage Silversmiths. He was also building inspector and bylaw enforcement officer for Drummond Township. He was active in the Balderson United Church and participated with the cubs of St. Paul’s United Church. The funeral service was held from Morrow’s Funeral Home on Tuesday, Oct 7 at 2 p.m. Rev. Murray Jos? and Dr. John Stewart conducted a comforting service The pallbearers were Roger Howes of Amherstvies Al Faux, John Robertson Monty Riopelle, Paul Ber?rim and R. W. Blair, all Perth. Ken was such a devoted family man, conscientious employee and dependable friend and neighbors that he will be truly missed. The many floral tributes, donations to the Heart Fund and kindnesses shown to Ken’s family shows the high esteem in which he was held.

CAMERON, T. Donald

In hospital, Kingston on Wednesday, February 25, 1998, T. Donald Cameron, in his 87th year. Beloved husband of Anna McDougall. Loved father of Donna (Ed) Moon of Toledo and Brian (Judy) of Napanee. Predeceased by sons Douglas and Kenneth. Brother of Margaret Lowe of Carleton Place. Predeceased by sisters Catherine Duncan and Agnes McFarlane and brother Keith. Also survived by 9 grandchildren and daughter-in-law Linda Armstrong of Perth. Friends may call at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, Perth, from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Friday. Funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday, February 28th, at 11 a.m. Interment Elmwood Cemetery. In remembrance, donations to the Great War Memorial Hospital Fund or Balderson United Church would be appreciated.

In Loving Memory of

Donald Cameron

Born July 15th, 1911

McDonalds Corners, Ontario

Passed Away February 25th, 1998 Kingston, Ontario

Services Saturday February 28th, 1998 at 11:00

Blair & Son Funeral Chapel, Perth

Clergy Dr. John Montgomery

Interment Elmwood Cemetery

Blair & Son Funeral Home

CAMERON, Douglas Donald

Peacefully in hospital, Ottawa, on Wednesday, October 8th, 1997 Douglas Donald Cameron, loved father of Prudence Cameron of Peterborough and Timothy Donald Cameron of Ottawa. Beloved son of Donald and Anna Cameron of Balderson. Dear brother of Donna (Ed) Moon of Toledo, Brian Cameron of Napanee and was predeceased by brother Kenneth Cameron. Douglas will be sadly missed by nieces nephews and friends. Friends may call at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, Perth. Friday, October 10th from 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted in Balderson United Church, Balderson, and Saturday at 11 a.m. Interment Highland Line Cemetery. In remembrance, contributions to the I.C.U. of the Ottawa General Hospital or the Highland Line Cemetery Memorial Fund would be appreciated

Balderson Cheese Factory — The Buchanan Scrapbook

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Balderson Cheese Factory — The Buchanan Scrapbook
With files from The Keeper of the Scrapbooks — Christina ‘tina’  Camelon Buchanan — Thanks to Diane Juby— click here..
Cheesemakers: W. Brown 1881-1887, J. Milton 1888-1891, W.D. Simes 1892-1901, E.E. Haley 1902-1904, J.M. Scott 1905-1911, T.K. Whyte 1912-1917, M. Haley 1918-1921, A. Quinn 1922-1929, G. Spencer 1930, P. Kirkham 1931-1937, J.L. Prentice 1937-1939, C.J. Bell 1939-1941, J. Somerville 1941-1942, W. Partridge 1943, C. Gallery 1944-1955, R. Lucas 1956-1958, P. George 1959-1960, O. Matte 1961-1966, Y. Leroux 1966-1974, L. Lalonde 1975-1980, N. Matte 1980.
John Closs —Lawrence Lalonde and Yves Leroux from Balderson Cheese on the outside.Young men. Andrea McCoy Centre

Mrs.James Balderson, sr., died at the family home, ninth line of Bathurst, onFriday, the 21st instant, at the age of 74 years.  She had been ill for over three months.  Deceased was born on the third concession of Bathurst, her maiden name being Mary Noonan, daughter of the late James Noonan,one of the prominent men of his day in this district.

Her marriage took place on May 26th, 1858, and had she lived a week longer, her married life would have spanned fifty-one years.  She settled with her husband on the ninth line, and there they lived for over half a century in peace and prosperity.   She is survived by her husband and the following family: James, in Bathurst; Miss Hannah, Toronto;William at home; Miss Annie, New York; Geo. Formerly of COURIER, now in San Francisco; Tom, in Bathurst; and Robert, teacher at Harper.

James and D.R. Noonan, town are brothers,and Mrs. O’Neil, Oswego, and Mrs. Lee, of Buffalo, are sisters.  Here is the first death in the family since the celebration of the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. James Noonan last winter at which she was present.  The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon to St. John’s church, thence to the parish cemetery.

Balderson in 1905 boasted few trees along the dirt road which was the main road to Perth. In the top photo from the left: the original Balderson cheese factory erected in 1881, the Noonan Blacksmith Shop, Cowie home, Anglican Church and rectory. From the right: the Noonan home, Jone’s Store, Haley property (1962), J.M. McGregor property, J.C. McGregor barn and home. Balderson at one time was known as Clarksville.– Perth Remembered

Ralph Barrie Son of Nettie and Harry Barrie Balderson

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

Balderson–Lanark Era–R.S. McTavish

Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

It’s Your Balderson News 1913

TWO HEARTS MADE ONE at Balderson Corners — Annie Findlay and “Short Jack” Mclntyre

Ralph Barrie Son of Nettie and Harry Barrie Balderson

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Ralph Barrie Son of Nettie and Harry Barrie Balderson
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Dec 1982, Wed  •  Page 3

Ralph Barrie isn’t your typical Lanark County farmer. Now heading into his fourth year as head of the 25,000-member Ontario Federation of Agriculture probably the most active farm lobby group in Canada and certainly the largest direct membership farm group Barrie feels he’s learned his trade as a farm leader. The 54-year-old dairy and beef farmer doesn’t mean he’ll try to hang on to the OFA presidency ” forever. When he was first elected president at the 1979 convention, he decided to plan on being president for three years. From now on, it is a year-by-year decision.

“Sometime before next November, I’ll have to decide whether or not there are things I can still do for the OFA,'” he said during an interview in the comfortable stone house on his farm near here.

Barrie said the OFA has made great strides in its credibility as lobbying group for the farm industry and in the strength of its membership base. While there haven’t been any dramatic breakthroughs, Barrie believes there’s been progress with the OFA’s two major concerns affordable credit and profitable pricing. “Progress comes a small step at a time. Events force issues,” he said. “The farm economy will force governments to look at better ways to ensure income and to provide a better long-term financing package than we have now.” He’s hopeful a national stabilization program will come out of federal-provincial discussions and Agriculture Minister Eugene Whelan will be successful in persuading his cabinet colleagues on the wisdom of agri-bonds a type of tax-free investment that would draw money into farm financing at much lower interest rates.

Barrie said it takes something like a depression to change public attitudes. “We should recognize the depression was a necessary evil to force us as farmers to look at the value of increased efficiency and productivity while making sure there’s the means to absorb that production at prices to compensate us adequately.” Farmers have been too involved in production and should have been more aware of the importance of the political side, Barrie believes. “We have to do both together. Farm specialists have learned how to use the tools of fertilizer, pesticides, machinery and genetics to improve production. “Now we need to learn to use the tools of lobbying and political action.” .Barrie said the controversy over Canagrex the proposed agricultural export corporation is n example of the politicians get-ling in the way of what the farmers want. He said Canagrex is necessary if Canadian agriculture is to take full advantage of the world marketplace but it’s being used as a partisan political issue.

Choosing the route of farm organization activist is not a decision Barrie regrets although he estimates he would be worth at least $100,000 more if he had stayed home and developed the farm. Barrie was born in a log house in Dalhousie Township north of Perth, youngest of four children of a poor dairy farmer. His father served in both world wars and bought the present Barrie farm under the Veterans’ Land Act in 1947. Ralph took it over when his father retired and has since added an adjoining farm. He enjoys weekends at home but being OFA president is pretty well a full-time job.

He spends most of every week in his Toronto office or on the road speaking at farm meetings, service clubs and other organizations. Sometimes wife Verna travels with him but more often she’s at home managing the farm. Two of the five Barrie children Brian, 23 and Doug, 28 help work the farm where there are 35 cows to milk and a heard of young steers and heifers being fattened for beef. Including some rented land, the Barrie family farms about 400 acres which produces all the feed for the dairy and beef operations.

Youngest son Paul, 20, lives at home but works at Balderson Cheese Co. Eldest daughter Shirley, 29, also works at the cheese company while daughter Diana, 24, lives in Perth. Barrie says there are a lot of people farming simply because they fell into it when their farmer-parents passed on or because it’s the only lifestyle they know. The farm leader has always had interests outside the farm. He served on the local fair board, on the board of stewards of his church and as president of Balderson. In the early ’70s, he turned his interest to the OFA first as Lanark County director, followed by two years as second vice-president and three years as first vice-president. He felt ready to move into the presidency in 1979 when Peter Hannam stepped down. A factor Barrie says could influence his decision concerning the OFA presidency next fall will be provincial and federal elections. “I’ve never been a card-carrying member of any party. I’m flexible. But I feel like a winner. I want to go where I’m needed.” He recognizes the two members now representing his area Paul Dick in Ottawa and Doug Wiseman at Queen’s Park are secure as long as they want to stay. “I’m not a constituency man. I’m more interested in policy development.” Barrie isn’t attracted by the possibility of becoming president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture or of getting involved in the International Federation of Agricultural Producers. “The structure of those organization limits what you can achieve.”

Barrie, Ralph James
Ralph passed away in Perth, on Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 at the age of 88 years. He was the beloved husband for 18 ½ years of the late Denyse Marion-Barrie (2012) and loved father of Shirley (Barry) Armstrong, Douglas Barrie, Diana (Norm) Dobbie, Brian (Jean) Barrie and Paul (Cathy) Barrie and step-father of Denyse’s sons Martin and Mathieu Lacroix. Ralph was the fond grandpa Dan (Currie) Armstrong, Lucas (Steph) Armstrong, Krista (Jon) Dobbie-McFarlane, Dustin (Brooke) Dobbie, Craig Dobbie, Angela (Jonathan) Tooley, Ashley (Adam) Barrie, Samantha (Eddy) Barrie and Hannah Barrie and great-grandfather of Aidan, Arianna, Noah and Zackary McFarlane, Reid, Ethan and Chase Tooley and soon to join the family, baby Barrie-Rayner. Ralph was predeceased by his parents Henry and Nettie (Davidson) Barrie, sisters Evelyn Gemmill and Eva Spence and by his children’s mother and former spouse Verna Barrie. He will be sadly missed by his brother Gordon Barrie and Denyse’s siblings and their families, his numerous nieces, nephews, friends and extended family. Ralph spent his adult life in the field of agriculture, first as a dairy farmer, when he took over the family farm near Balderson, Ontario, then becoming involved in local farm organizations, and eventually rising through the ranks of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA) becoming its president for several years, during which time he travelled across Canada and abroad as a spokesperson. Afterwards he worked with government marketing boards, until his retirement when he continued to enjoy travel with Denyse, along with skiing, biking, swimming and his beloved golf. Ralph remained a “country boy” at heart, always content to watch and enjoy nature

Marvin Arnold Walker — Another Ron Bos Genealogy Mystery

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Marvin Arnold Walker — Another Ron Bos Genealogy Mystery

 

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Marvin is the older boy in the photo Photo- Courtesy Ron Bos

From Ron Bos—Here is a bit of a mystery:
In 2002 I bought a property at Kilmarnock. While doing renovations, I discovered a grave marker type of stone buried under rubble under the porch with “Martin A. Walker 1908-1930″ engraved in the marble. It’s about 2’ x 1’ x 4” thick. For 16 years I couldn’t figure out who Martin (Marvin) Walker was.

 

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That is the stone I found under the porch at Kilmarnock. I’m curious to know what stone is on his grave at Hillcrest ?The year of death is wrong on both the stone and the grave information at Hillcrest. He died January 7th 1931. On his death certificate they corrected 1930 to 1931 in 3 different places.

Through research by my good friends Holly and Garth Dixon this past week, we have determined that the stone belongs to Marvin Arnold Walker 1908-1930. Marvin was born in Temiskaming Ontario in 1908 to Anson S. Walker and Ethel Elbott Walker. He had two sisters and three brothers, Hazel, Julie, John, Howard and Cecil. The family settled on Con 9 in Balderson where Anson Walker was listed as a cheese maker in the 1921 census. They were Methodist.
On January 7th 1931 Marvin Walker died in a mining accident in Kirkland Lake. He was originally buried in Lombardy, but is now buried at Hillcrest cemetery in Smiths Falls.
The mystery is, what is the connection to Kilmarnock? In the time frame Marvin lived, my property was owned by Albert Newsome and Margaret Muir Newsome. They had a daughter named Elizabeth Newsome who married Robert Shields, and a ward named Flora Sweetin who never married. Both girls were 20+ years Marvin’s senior in the year of his death. The house was left to Elizabeth & Flora on Albert Newsome’s death in 1930.
I’m hoping there are surviving family members that may shed light on the mystery.

Anyone? 

 

 

historicalnotes

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The Sons of Anson & Ethel Walker

1921–Carleton Place, Ontario, Canada–Left to right: Howard, Cecil, Marvin, John

 

 

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                             Other Rob Bos Mystery

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Can anyone tell me what this is ?
It appears to be a dairy product stamp. It’s 7” wide, 1/4” thick and feels like it is made of lead.

Answer- We found these were cheese stampers that they used to stamp the cheese rounds with. Keep them coming Ron!!

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Thomas Raines Almonte — US Confederate Soldier Mayor and Dentist– Biological Mystery!!!

The Mystery of the Alfred McNeely’s — Were there Two?

Another Lanark County “Murdoch Mystery” –Elfreda Drummond of Ashton

Carleton Place Masonic Lodge Mystery

TWO HEARTS MADE ONE at Balderson Corners — Annie Findlay and “Short Jack” Mclntyre

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TWO HEARTS MADE ONE at Balderson Corners — Annie Findlay and “Short Jack” Mclntyre

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Balderson-Perth Remembered

The initial story

The 8th and 9th concessions of Balderson forgot their feuds and two join hands in marriage. In July 9 of 1890 many of the good citizens of Winnipeg and Manitoba who hail from the County of Lanark, more especially those who can claim the proud distinction of being able to refer to Balderson’s Corners as the fountain of civilization from which sprang their social life, will learn with pleasure that Mr. John P. (Patton) Mclntyre, of Bathurst, familiarly known throughout the county as “Short Jack,” today renounced bachelorship, and led one of the fair ladies of “The Corners,” in the person of Miss Annie Findlay to the altar.

The event had been looked forward to for a considerable time by the many friends of the happy couple, and this announcement that the event was to take place created quite a ripple among the society of the neighbourhood, especially along the 8th and 9th lines. The invitations were numerous and were generally accepted. Guests were present from all sections of the county, many coming from points as far distant as Dalhousie, Lavant, South Sherbrooke and the “Snow Road.”

The ceremony was performed by the Kev. Mr. Mcllwraith, the minister to whom a call was recently moderated in by the Lanark presbytery. Now that “Short Jack” is off the hooks, it is felt here that the good example will be followed by the numerous young “bloods” of the concessions, and that they will go and do likewise. As the new couple left on the honeymoon trip, the good old fashioned jubilations were indulged in along the route.

Many shots were fired and other manifestations of joy and good feeling were exhibited. The happy groom had many friends and relatives in Winnipeg, being a first cousin of Mr. P. C. Mclntyre, a well known citizen of the city. It may surprise some to learn that “Short Jack” is P. C’s senior by quite a few years. It is a well-known characteristic of the Mclntyre clan that in matrimonial affairs, as in all matters of business, they are uncanny, but experience has proved that they eventually fall victims to Cupid’s all too powerful darts.

The Update

I went sleuthing after I wrote this and found out: Annie gave birth to a daughter named Annie a little over a year later when Annie her mother was 39. Annie, the mother was obviously ill after giving birth as she died barely 4 years later in 1895. John got remarried (unknown) and added a male child to the family in 1896 and died later in 1900 at the age of 62 leaving two children age 4 and 9.

 

geneaAnnie W Findly, spinster
Age: 38
Birth Year: abt 1852
Birth Place: 9th Concession of Balderson
Marriage Date: 9 Jul 1890
Marriage Place: Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father: Alex Findly
Mother: Annie Young
Spouse: John P McIntyre

Marriage

9 Jul 1890 • Perth, Drummond Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada

John P McIntyre, farmer
Age: 52
Birth Year: abt 1838
Birth Place: 8th Penssion of Drummond
Marriage Date: 9 Jul 1890
Marriage Place: Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father: Peter McIntyre
Mother: Christina McIntyre

Spouse: Annie W Findly

Birth

Annie Finlay McIntyre

1891–BIRTH 8 OCT 1891  Bathurst, Lanark, Ontario, Canada

DEATH Unknown

Death of Mother Annie W. Findlay(1850–1895)
20 Oct 1895 • Bathurst Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada
1895


Birth of Brother Peter Finlay McIntyre(1896–)

22 Jun 1896 • Balderson Drummond Lanark, , Ontario, Canada
1896

Death of Father John Patton McIntyre(1838–1900)
21 Apr 1900 • Perth Town, Drummond Lanark, Ontario, Canada

 

The Cheese Souffle that Went from Balderson to Carleton Place– Little Known Fact

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The Cheese Souffle that  Went from Balderson to Carleton Place– Little Known Fact

 - s LITTLE KNOWN NEW YEAR'S NONSENSE: Perth once...

 

The Balderson Cheese Factory dates back to 1881 and was named after the village of Balderson which was originally founded by Sergeant John Balderson of the British Army. This company was created by fifty one milk shippers who collectively decided to form a dairy co-operative and build their own cheese factory which would provide them with a reliable and local market for their milk.

The Balderson Corner’s cheese factory grew in popularity and prospered over the next decate. In 1892-93 it was one of twelve local factories that was selected to contribute in the making of the Mammoth Cheese which was Canada’s unique dairy display at the Chicago World’s Fair. The company’s development continued without any major setbacks until in 1928 the factory was destroyed by fire. Fortunately the determination of the shareholders did not falter and rebuilding started immediately. No word if Carleton Place had cheese for life after that incident.

 

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Cheesemakers: W. Brown 1881-1887, J. Milton 1888-1891, W.D. Simes 1892-1901, E.E. Haley 1902-1904, J.M. Scott 1905-1911, T.K. Whyte 1912-1917, M. Haley 1918-1921, A. Quinn 1922-1929, G. Spencer 1930, P. Kirkham 1931-1937, J.L. Prentice 1937-1939, C.J. Bell 1939-1941, J. Somerville 1941-1942, W. Partridge 1943, C. Gallery 1944-1955, R. Lucas 1956-1958, P. George 1959-1960, O. Matte 1961-1966, Y. Leroux 1966-1974, L. Lalonde 1975-1980, N. Matte 1980.

 

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1954 Balderson Cheese Factory

 

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John Closs Lawrence Lalonde and Yves Leroux from Balderson Cheese on the outside.Young men. Andrea McCoy Centre

 

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Prentice family at Balderson Cheese Factory, about 1942

 

 

Mrs.James Balderson, sr., died at the family home, ninth line of Bathurst, onFriday, the 21st instant, at the age of 74 years.  She had been ill for over three months.  Deceased was born on the third concession of Bathurst, her maiden name being Mary Noonan, daughter of the late James Noonan,one of the prominent men of his day in this district.

Her marriage took place on May 26th, 1858, and had she lived a week longer, her married life would have spanned fifty-one years.  She settled with her husband on the ninth line, and there they lived for over half a century in peace and prosperity.   She is survived by her husband and the following family: James, in Bathurst; Miss Hannah, Toronto;William at home; Miss Annie, New York; Geo. Formerly of COURIER, now in San Francisco; Tom, in Bathurst; and Robert, teacher at Harper.

James and D.R. Noonan, town are brothers,and Mrs. O’Neil, Oswego, and Mrs. Lee, of Buffalo, are sisters.  Here is the first death in the family since the celebration of the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. James Noonan last winter at which she was present.  The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon to St. John’s church, thence to the parish cemetery. (28 May 1909 pg 4)

 

Balderson in 1905 boasted few trees along the dirt road which was the main road to Perth. In the top photo from the left: the original Balderson cheese factory erected in 1881, the Noonan Blacksmith Shop, Cowie home, Anglican Church and rectory. From the right: the Noonan home, Jone’s Store, Haley property (1962), J.M. McGregor property, J.C. McGregor barn and home. Balderson at one time was known as Clarksville.– Perth Remembered

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

When the Cheese Crashed Through the Floor

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

Balderson–Lanark Era–R.S. McTavish

Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

It’s Your Balderson News 1913

Middleville Genealogy-McIlraith- Sommerville

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Middleville Genealogy-McIlraith- Sommerville

December 24, 1941

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Photo-Perth Remembered

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  22 Jul 1958, Tue,  Page 24

 

 

historicalnotes

June 03 1898-Perth Courier

Rev. J. S. Mcllraith, of Balderson, and Rev. W. S. Smith, of this place, exchanged pulpits on Sunday last.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

 

Middleville–The Vertical Board House–Another Beaver Medallion

The Middleville Chair that Ended up Rocking John F. Kennedy President of the United States

Have You Ever Paid Tribute to our Pioneers? Middleville Pioneer Cemetery

 

It’s the Middleville News

Hissing Steam, Parades and a 1930 Hearse–Pioneer Days Middleville

When History Comes to You–A Visit from Middleville

EARLY SETTLEMENT OF DALHOUSIE-Tina Penman, Middleville, Ont.

Visiting the Neighbours — Middleville Ontario and Down the 511

When History Comes to You–A Visit from Middleville

Where is it Now? The Heirloom of William Camelon

 

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The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

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The Day the Balderson Telephone Co Disappeared

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Photo-From Perth Remembered–Balderson Telephone Company. Note the phone booth out front of the house in the picture. The company was bought by Bell Canada in 1977.

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One short six long was the ring that had always been part of the Balderson Telephone Company which was sold to Bell in the 70s as the aging equipment could not longer cope with the volume of calls. It was over quickly with a 92-29 vote from the shareholders of the telephone company when the last of the independent manual switchboard operation decided to join the Bell Telephone Canada system in July of 1975.

Established in 1912 there would no longer be a lone telephone operator to distinguish the callers. Bell telephone wouldn’t give a hoot about the difference between Body Shop Dave and Lumber Dealer Ray. Of course not everyone in the area was happy, and some thought that the telephone company should have held out for more than Bell’s $20,000 offer. Then there were others that thought that the Balderson Telephone Company should also turn over the house to Peg Smith who had been the lone switchboard operator for the past 18 years. Peg had manned the 24 hour a day, 7 days a week job, for 18 years in that same location.

Devoted and hard working she had never missed a day except when she had been in the hospital. It was said she knew everyone’s number and voice, but if they came to the door they would be out of luck as she wouldn’t have a clue. Peg had never made over $4500 in salary for her almost thankless job, and even in 1973 her salary was a mere $3700.

Now things were changing and long distance calls would now be charged even if you called Perth a mere 6 miles away. Calls would be now be rerouted through Smith Falls and Perth. There would now be 35 party lines with 10 residences on each line and only 34 private lines as Bell just couldn’t provide anymore. Peg wasn’t happy about that and thought they were trying to crowd folks out. After all she used to handle over 400 calls a day  all going to wooden wall phones in the area. Peg was number 6 in a line of Balderson switchboard operators and she used a used board the locals had bought from somewhere in Quebec in 1960.

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal18 Jul 1975, FriPage 45

 

The Balderson Telephone Company had been formed in 1910, and by 1915 it had 114 subscribers. Originally 200 poles were bought and distributed by 2 men and a team of horses for 30 cents an hour. But even before that Bathurst  and Drummond Townships had to give their approval before they could even mutter the “Operator”. Thirty two phones were ordered and Jim Watt was the first operator and got $1.25 a year for his trouble. Then it was shifted to the homes of Harvey McCue, Bob Balderson, Ross Sommerville and Mrs. Donald Cameron. In 1948 they decided the costs were way too much moving it around so  they bought the house that is shown above and incorporated as the Balderson Telephone Company in 1920. Peg Smith said she had no doubt she would find a job somewhere else and was going to take the first vacation she ever had in 17 years.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related posts

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

Balderson–Lanark Era–R.S. McTavish

Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

 

 

It’s Your Balderson News 1913

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It’s Your Balderson News 1913

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Mrs. W. J. Rintoul has gone visit friends in Middleville and Darling.

Some of our young men have returned from the west to spend the winter in Ontario.

Mr. James I. Watt and Mr. David Rintoul treated some of their friends to a dinner on Christmas day.

A large load, principally ladies, went from this place to a concert at Harper. All report a good time.

Miss Forester of Westport has been engaged as teacher for the junior derpartment of Balderson for the ensuing term.

The temperance people in the township of Drummond are anxious to pass local option on the 6th of January.

Miss Carrie Watt, teacher, Snow Road, is spending her Christmas holidays with her parents of this place.

The Presbyterian Sunday School entertainment, held on the evening of the 26th, was a grand success. The program consisted of songs, recitations and dialogues. The musical part was well rendered by seven of the young men of this place, whom we call the string band of Balderson. There was also a debate from four of the same young men on the married life and single life. The married life came out best. The school house was crowded to overflowing, the proceeds amounting to $137.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

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Before and After in Balderson

Oh Woe is Emily J Publow of Balderson

Being A Charles Dobbie Groupie — Balderson Before Selfies

The Country Fairs 1879

Standard



TheFirstSchoolFair1914or1915AlmonteFairGroundsBW.jpg

Photo by www.almontefair.ca  1894–Almonte 

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Flooded Old Wooden Arch Entrance 1983 Photo by www.almontefair.ca

FAIRS APPOINTED TO BE HELD WITHIN LEEDS, GRENVILLE, LANARK, AND RENFREW.

 

Almonte, April and October, last Thursday in.

Bastard, at Portland, April and Sept., last Thursday
in.

Bellamy’s Mills, April on 3d Wednesday, November on
2nd Wednesday.

Brockville, May, 1st Tuesday ; October, 2nd Tuesday.

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Photo from –Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum –The circus in the summer of 1885– from the Almonte Gazette



Burritt’s Rapids, January, 1st Tuesday ; April, do.,
September, last Thursday.

Carleton Place, April and November, 1st Tuesday in.

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Vintage Smiths Falls & Perth–A postcard of Perth’s Citizens’ Band, 42 Reg’t. On the back of the card it says they are open to engage for Fairs, Demonstrations, Picnics, Socials, At-Homes, etc.Dance Music Furnished.For terms apply to A.H. Keays, Bandmaster and Secretary. c1910



Farmersville, May and October, 2nd Wednesday in.

Ferguson’s Falls ” ” 3rd Tuesday in.

Franktown, ” ” ” 2nd Tuesday in.

Frankville, October, 1st Wednesday in.

Kemptville, March, June, September, and December,
1st Wednesday in.

Kitley, at Toledo, May, 1st Tuesday ; September, last
Friday.

Lanark, May and October, 2nd Tuesday in.



Lyndhurst, October 22nd.

Merrickville, April, May, September, October, and
November, 1st Thursday in.

 

 

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Middleville was not listed.. but it has been a fall tradition since 1851


New Dublin (Elizabethtown) March and June, 2nd
Tuesday in ; September and November, 4th Tuesday in.

North Augusta, April, October, and November, 1st
Friday in.

Oxford Mills, Jan., April, July, Oct., 1st We’nesd’y in.

Pakenham, May, 2nd Tuesday in; October, 2nd
Thursday in.

Pembroke, March, 1st Wednesday in ; October, 3rd
Wednesday in.

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This picture (c. late 1800’s early 1900’s) would have been taken at the fairground location in off Wilson Street behind where the Planing Mill was and the Metro Store location now around what is now Alvin Street and Clyde Street.
Perth, May and October, 1st Tuesday in.-Perth Remembered 

Renfrew, April and October, 2nd Tuesday in.

Ross (Forester’s Falls), April and October, 4th Tues-
day in.

Sandpoint, May and October, 1st Tuesday in.

Westport ” ” ” 2nd Tuesday in.

historicalnotes

 

*THE PERTH FAIR –from Perth Remembered

This picture (c. late 1800’s early 1900’s) would have been taken at the fairground location in off Wilson Street behind where the Planing Mill was and the Metro Store location now around what is now Alvin Street and Clyde Street. This land was sold as it became to small for the fairgrounds and became a housing development known as Fairholm Park. Some homes from Herriot Street were moved here when they were building the Wampole Houses. The fairgrounds were then located at the present location.

 

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NO Richmond Fair mentioned either

This photo of the fairgrounds, taken in 1913, harkens back to the days before midway rides and food trucks (and look at the outfits!). It was growing in popularity and attendance, in fact just six years before this photo was taken it moved from a two day event to three, and there was mention of people taking the train just to attend the Richmond Fair!- Photo from the  Goulbourn Museum

Perth Courier, October 7, 1870

 

A sad accident occurred at McDonald’s Corners on Friday evening, 30th Sept., which resulted in the death of Mr. Wm. Donnally of Palmerston.  The particulars are as follows:  while going home from the fair held at that village, Wm. Donnally and Caswell Scott commenced running races and when about three miles from McDonald’s Corners, they were running past some wagons, one going on each side.  When near Mr. E. Geddes’ wagon, Donnally’s horse threw him, and he either fell against the wagon or it ran over him, rendering him insensible.  He was immediately removed and coming to his senses after a while he was then taken to Mr. Geddes home, where he lingered until Saturday night when he died. He leaves a wife and a large family of small children to mourn his loss.  This is one more on the list of deaths caused by intemperance.

Spring Fair Day of 1852 at Carleton Place: James Poole- Howard Morton Brown

“The Spring Fair was held at Carleton Place last Tuesday.  Very indifferent Milch cows brought 20 pounds.  There was an average stock of drunken bipeds in the village, some of whom were under eighteen years.  The day was finished with one of those party fights between Orangemen and Catholics, which have been the disgrace and ruin of Ireland and which occasionally break out among her sons in this land of their adoption.  We know not what length their passions would have carried them had they not been checked by the prompt and decisive action of Mr. Robert Bell, who was called there by the uproar, where there were about fifty actually engaged, and the whole crowd which filled the street were fast giving way to their passions.”

Perth Courier, October 16, 1931

Archibald Rankin

By R.A.J. in the Ottawa Citizen)

Archibald Rankin who for more than a generation ranked as one of Lanark County’s outstanding men today spends the evening of his long and useful life in a ivy clad cottage that is surrounded by a wealth of beautiful flowers and where from the shaded rose arbors this fine old gentleman may look out upon the rugged hills and verdant valleys—whose enchanting beauty attracted his forebears, perhaps because it so resembled the burns and ferns of beloved Scotland.

The quaint little village of Middleville where Mr. Rankin resides was once a center of social and commercial activity and shared with Lanark Village the distinction of being the community center for these early settlers who came to Upper Canada in 1820-21.  Among the number who came out at that time were Archibald Rankin and his wife Jean Scott; they came in the fall of 1821 when Lord Dalhousie, who is described as a distinguished soldier and close friend of Sir Walter Scott, was governor of Canada.  The Rankins settled near Middleville and a few months after their arrival a son was born and they called him James.

Eventually James Rankin and Jean Campbell were married and to that union a family of six were born the eldest son being Archibald Rankin, subject of this sketch who has lived his useful life of 82 years in that vicinity most of the time on the farm that had been cleared through the toil of his pioneer grandfather.  His services to the community have been generous; his ministry to those about him have been unselfish and his attitude has been:

“Thrice happy then if some one can say

I lived because he has passed my way.”

After acquiring a modest education in the quaint little school at Middleville, Archibald Rankin qualified as a teacher and for four years taught in the school in which he had been educated.  He became clerk of the municipality a post which he filled with the utmost satisfaction for the record period of 52 years he having succeeded his great uncle William Scott.  Mr. Rankin recalls that John Rayside Gemmill was the first municipal clerk when the township was organized; he was also the first to publish a newspaper in Lanark County and subsequently as a publisher went to Sarnia.

But clerk of the municipality was only part of Mr. Rankin’s many and varied duties.  He was a secretary and treasurer of the famed Middleville fair over a period of 55 years; he practically organized the Middleville Division of the Sons of Temperance; he was a member of the Sons of Temperance when he was 13 years old; he attended several conventions as a youth and in 1913 at the Cahawa Convention he was elected Grand Worthy Patriarch of Ontario, the highest office in the gift of the members.  He was treasurer of the Congregational Church of Middleville for more than half a century and he continued to serve as treasurer and Sunday school secretary after the advent of the church union.  He was secretary of the local Oddfellows and Foresters Lodge throughout the greater part of his life.  He joined the church choir in the days of the precentor and tuning fork and is still an active member at the age of 82.

Mr. Rankin recalls the coming to Middleville of the first clergyman of the Congregational denomination.  He was Rev. R.H. Black, a sturdy man of strong principles who came out from Dunkirk, Scotland in 1852 and organized the congregation in Middleville.  In that church, Mr. Rankin was married to Beatrice Ellies daughter of a pioneer of Dalhousie Township who passed away in 1900.  They were the last couple upon whom banns were pronounced.  The license system came into vogue at that time.

While performing the exact duties of his many offices, Mr. Rankin also operated a farm on the outskirts of Middleville but in 1913 he disposed of the property and moved to his attractive present home in the village where with a devoted daughter he is enjoying the peaceful sunset of a busy life.  He is a constant reader, a deep thinker, and his penmanship is like copperplate; he delights to dwell on people and events of the past and perhaps his most treasured possession is a Bible presented to him by the pupils of that little Middleville school upon his retirement in 1876.

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Photograph from the Dawson Kerr collection in the Perth Museum, Perth, Ont. Mr. Kerr was raised in in the village of Fallbrook, Ont., just a couple of miles north-west of Balderson, where this fair was located (see Don McGregor’s email to me below). I had previously speculated on this website that the location of the fair was Fallbrook, but Don McGregor has set the record straight. The two photos show different views of the same crowd. Charles Dobie Collection

 

Are You Ever too Old to Go to The Rural Fair? — Almonte

It Happened at The Richmond Fair 2012 – Photo Memories

Doin’ the Funky Chicken in Lanark County

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

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