Tag Archives: bakery

Documenting Mr.and Mrs. William Fest Transportation Building or—I Want Candy

Standard
Documenting Mr.and Mrs. William Fest Transportation Building or—I Want Candy
Located on one of the busiest intersection in Ottawa, the Transportation building almost remained unchanged; only its ground floor was modified and became one of the main entrance to the Rideau Centre. Photo- Ottawa Archives- from PastOttawa
Lost Ottawa
December 19, 2013  · 




Ottawa’s “Transportation Building” at Rideau and Colonel By, seen from the from the southwest. In the bottom, the old Elephant and Castle.

The building opened in 1916 by JR Booth’s son, CJ Booth, and has many federal civil servants over the years — I think the NCC was in there at one time. Still good looking.

The building served as Ottawa’s City Hall between 1931 (when the City Hall on Elgin burned down) and 1958, when the new — now old — city hall was built at Rideau Falls.
Blair StannardOld Ottawa And Bytown Pics
March 1  · 

Ottawa – 1966 – the Transportation Building at Rideau and Sussex. It was the site of the Ottawa city hall, after the former city hall at Elgin and Queen burned in 1931. It served as such until the new city hall building was built on Green Island. (1958)
City of Ottawa Archives CA 000155

Lost Ottawa

August 27, 2016  · Here’s a major Ottawa corner in January of 1910. This is Rideau and Little Sussex, which is now the southeast corner of Rideau and Colonel By. Sinkhole to the left.This building once housed jeweler James Tracy, the drug store of William Roger, and the Dairy Lunch. Kind of a mini Rideau Mall.The corner would be transformed in 1916 with the construction of the Transportation Building (once the home of the NCC, and once also the home of City Hall).(LAC PA-042564)

The Fest Family

In 1887 on the site of the Transportation building southeast corner of Rideau and Little Sussex streets, there stood a 2and one half storey tin-roofed, solid stone building. That old building, a relic from the 1850s, was occupied by Mrs. William Fest. Her shop was the candy and pastry centre of Ottawa in the 1880s.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Nov 1931, Sat  •  Page 32

Everybody in the 1870s- 1880s in Ottawa knew the Fests. Fest’s confectionery store, at the southeast corner of Rideau and Little Sussex streets, was known to everybody in Ottawa, It occupied the same position in the public eye that Scott’s confectionery on Sparks street did in the 1860s and 1870s. The Fests came to Ottawa from the county Donegal in the late 1860s and opened a confectionery store in the 2 1-2 storey stone building where the Transportation building now stands.

Mrs William ( Pender) Fest in the early 1880s was an indefatigable worker. The Fests attended St. John’s Anglican church on Sussex street. In church work Mrs. Fest was always just as busy as she was in her store. Mrs. Fest was noted for her equable and calm disposition. She always had a cheery word for her customers and was a good judge of human nature. Whenever a new girl came to the store to serve, Mrs Fest would say, “Now, my dear, eat all the candy you feel like eating, but do not take any home. If I find you taking any home I will have to discharge you. It will not be necessary for you to wait till I am out to eat. You may do it when I am present.”

The result of such talks was that Mrs. Fest’s girls, or parcel boys, used invariably to start in to gorge themselves on candy (mostly when Mrs. Fest was not around). The further result was that they always got sick, their stomachs turned upside down and candy became repulslve to them. Thereafter the Fest candy became as safe from attack as though it had not been there. Mr. Fest was seldom seen by the public. He was always too busy at the back making cakes and candies.

1901 Census

Name:William Fest
Gender:Male
Race:White
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canadian
Marital status:Married
Age:25
Birth Date:26 Mar 1875
Birth Place:Ontario
Relation to Head of House:Head
Occupation:Confectioner
Hourly Wage:432
Working at Trade in Factory or in Home:F
Months Employed at Trade in Factory:12
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
Can Speak English:Yes
Province:Ontario
District:Ottawa (City/Cité)
District Number:100
Sub-District:Ottawa (City/Cité) Central (Ward/Quartier)
Sub-District Number:5
Family Number:72
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeWilliam Fest25Margurite Fest27Margurite Fest5Katherine G Fest2George Fitzgerald29
William Fest
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1891, Thu  •  Page 4

Transportation Building — It was incorporated into the Rideau Centre and is heritage designated.

Joy Eastop WatsonNCC was definitely in there, My mom worked for the NCC for 26 years & I remember looking out those big 1st floor windows when the Santa parade went by in the 70’s… Those were also the days when you could open the window and smoke in the office.

Andrew DeBeaupréWasn’t it also known as the Dominion Bridge building before WWII? NCC was there in mid-70s

David TwolanI miss the Elephant and Castle. Great pub.

Blair StannardOld Ottawa And Bytown Pics
March 1  · 




Ottawa – 1966 – the Transportation Building at Rideau and Sussex. It was the site of the Ottawa city hall, after the former city hall at Elgin and Queen burned in 1931. It served as such until the new city hall building was built on Green Island. (1958)
City of Ottawa Archives CA 000155

From Ottawa City Directory 1870-1871 Simpson Book Collection

From Ottawa City Directory 1887-1888 Simpson Book Collection

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

Documenting Isabel Hogan’s Candy Store

It Started in the Candy Kitchen Restaurant– Kerfoot Fire Smiths Falls

Memories of the Ideal Candy Shop

Coffee Talk– Coolidge’s Penny Candy and Rochester Street– For Tom Edwards

From Chocolate to Lofts- Memories of Patterkrisp Candy?

Pour Some Sugar on Me! The Demise of the Penny Candy

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

The Candy Man — George Dummert

Margaret Love -From Sweet to Sour

The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2

Standard
The Second Location of Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place?–Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 2
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Jun 1899, Mon  •  Page 5

Read the Clipping above….

Where was the first Darou Bakery? Was it on Bell or Mill Street?

Second location

Photo from Doug Caldwell

So Doug showed me this photo on Saturday and said he had no idea where the second bakery was.. It didn’t take me long to figure it out.

Darou’s second bakery was in the Capital Optical building on Bridge Street which later became Woodcock’s Bakery. One of the senior Jamieson’s confirmed it with : Darou’s was in that building before Woodcocks!

Third location

On the corner of Emily and Bridge Street- read- What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1928, Fri  •  Page 9
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is relatedreading-3.jpg



Glory Days in Carleton Place — Doug Caldwell

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

The White Pines of Carleton Place — Caldwell Jamieson Dunlop Reunion – Part 1

Woodcocks Bakery

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery



This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 251080795_10158497991176886_7026546186636106033_n.jpg



What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

Standard
What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

I write about community and the history these folks gave us. Sometimes great little stories pop up while you are researching. I was doing a typical geneaology page for the Darou’s and Dunlops who had Darou’s Bakery on Bridge Street in Carleton Place when I came up with Minnie the Hooker’s story. Everyone needs to be remembered so now Minnie is with great joy and happiness.

Where was Darou’s?

Ray PaquetteBeginning at the bottom of Bridge Street in Carleton Place, on the west side: the Texaco station, the Salvation Army Citadel, Levines, Hick’s Grocery, Charlie Jay Shoe Repair, Mae Mulvey’s Candy Shop. Central Grill, Galvin’s Men’s Wear, Carleton Grill ( and the Colonial Bus Lines stop), the Roxy Theatre, Harold Dowdall’s Barbersop, Denny Coyles Esso, Ned Root’s Shoe Repair, Stanzel’s Taxi, Dr. McDowell, Darou’s Bakery. Doucette Insurance, McAllister’s Bike Repair, Oona’s Applicances/Bob Flint TV, Hastie Bros Plumbing, Bruce McDonald Optometrist, Foote Photography, the public restrooms, the Queens Hotel, Woodcock’s Bakery, Lewis Reg’d Ladies Wear, Okilman’s, and Patterson’s Furniture. I probably forgot a business but I’m sure other readers can “fill in the blanks” or take exception to some of the names on the list. More to come when I crossover to the East side of bridge…

BAKERS.
BOWLAND, R. H., Bell street.
DAROU, MRS. A., Bridge street.
JENKINS, W., High street.
SWAN, JOHN, Bridge street.-Carleton Place 1903 Business Directory –Names Names Names

34 Bridge Street Carleton Place The Little Red Brick House
This brick building was built circa 1900 and was the home of Thomas Stevenson and his half sister, Miss Brisland. They took up residence in the early 1930s and first operated the little store next door later known the Central Candy Store, but it was called Thomas Stevenson Grocery. When they extended the store to make living quarters, they sold the little red brick house.
Prior to Mr. Stevenson living here one of the Burgess’s and *John Darou lived here. The parents of Jack the Kidd and *Velma Bryce, Mr. and Mrs. Bracewell, lived in this building as well as Alex and Viola Watson and Mrs. McEwan.
116 Bridge Street  Circa 1870
116 Bridge Street was the home of the Darou’s bakery for approximately sixteen years. Darou’s bakery was later operated by Minnie who was the daughter of the Darou’s and Earl Dunlop. It was under the ownership of the Dunlop’s up until 1957 when Nat Nelson purchased the building and operated a delicatessen with his wife bought the building. The Bridge Street store used to be the home base for Nate’s Delicatessen, which was run by Nelson’s parents. Paul took over when his dad died and operated a photography shop. Paul Nelson cherished, long time member of the Carleton Place Community, passed away Monday, February 28, 2011.
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1922, Fri  •  Page 6

Who was Minnie the Hooker?

By Garry Bouey Citizen staff writer

Nobody can accuse Minnie Dunlop of misspending her youth. Sure, she shoots pool a couple of times a week and may go dancing once or twice or play bingo. But after all, Minnie is almost 82 and times have changed. Minnie, who lives in a senior citizens’ high rise on MacLaren Street, looks quite comfortable with a pool cue in her hand. “C’mon baby, c’mon baby,” she says, urging the brown ball to its intended destination. “They call me Minnie the Hooker,” she says, and quickly adds an explanation: in snooker, you “hook” your opponents by leaving them without a shot. Not every ball makes it, of course. Snooker is a demanding game and Minnie didn’t take it up until last fall. “My oldest son is 53,” says Minnie, “and when he found out he said ‘Mother, don’t tell me. I never thought I’d live to see the day you’d be playing pool’.

The Dunlops operated Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place until 1953 and lived across the street from a pool hall. If you read below her husband was also the mayor of Carleton Place at one point. ( Read-Tales From McCann’s Pool Room – Rob Probert) Minnie remembers hauling her sons home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Now she shoots in a seven-team house league and enjoys it immensely. “I like anything where there’s competition,” she says. “I bowled until this winter but it got too cold to go out. With pool, I can play right in the building.” With partner John Beaulieu, Minnie leads the other six mixed teams in the league, organized . by fellow-resident Maurice Trudeau, Ottawa’s senior citizen snooker champ last year. Next year, Trudeau hopes his league can play off with representatives from other seniors’ buildings. No doubt Minnie will be there.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada29 Mar 1979, Thu  •  Page 1

Jamie DunlopThere were stories about how my dad and brothers and sister worked in the bakery when they were growing up. They delivered bread by horse and cart when they were kids. It was quite a shock to see Minnie on Facebook playing pool. I have the Citizen picture and article from when it came out in the 80s(?). She was no shrinking violet for sure. Thanks for the interest.

Minnie the Hooker’s Husband CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Sep 1960, Mon  •  Page 12

Family

John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Diane JudgeMy Mom’s parents were Ida and Charles Darou, owned the dairy in Lanark, my grandmother Ida would order meat & food from there, and they delivered to the Darou home , next to the machine shop, which they owned as well.– read John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Upper George Street, Lanark, shop of John P. Leslie, wagon maker. The shop did buggy repairs, general, built new wheels, etc. and was also an agency for the machinery shown in front. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie lived above the shop at the time. Next is the home of James Darou and next the Labelle home–.

Janet LockyerI remember some Darou’s of Lanark, in the late 1960s, dad build a cottage on the Clyde river, near the bridge dump. Jim Darou and sons had a cottage down at the point and Jim and my dad sure managed to get into some fun situations.. Thanks for giving me these memories back, had a chuckle remembering. There was one time that my dad, from the city, went off with Jim Darou to get corn for a corn roast. Jim been the leader of this expeditation, said why pay for corn, he knew where they could get it for nothing. Off they go, hours later they return, muddy, dad pants were torn up and they are laughing away. Jim took dad to a farmer’s field, surrounded by barber wire of course. They climbed the wire got lots of “free” corn. We boiled it up, smothered it with butter and salt and nearly broke our teeth trying to eat it. Dad and Jim just laughed and laughed watching us trying to eat COW corn. There really is a difference between the corn, one for humans and one for cows.

Paul MilotteI remember it being called the Cow bridge as well. If memory serves me right it was used to let Cows cross the river as part of the old Plant farm. It was a huge dairy farm back in the day and the Darou family dairy business bought milk from them. The main building of the Plant farm is the old Caldwell mansion that is now a bead and breakfast. Anybody remember the Red barn behind the main house? I think the same family converted the the old mansion into a nursing home after the farming operation had stopped.-Primitive Bridges –Where was this Bridge?

staff at Darou’s-
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1939, Thu  •  Page 21

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

Aitkenhead Bakery Ottawa, OntarioBefore there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

Standard
What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

 

McLean Bakery -Almonte.com

Archibald McLean was one of the last surviving veterans in the district from the Fenian Raid. McLean’s bake shop was operated in 1862 by Archie McLean and for several years he was the oldest resident of the town who had been born in Almonte.

Almonte Brass Band– Photo-Almonte.com

Archie was succeeded by his brother “A.J.” commonly known as “Sid” who died only a few years ago. He was the old stand-by in the early Almonte “Brass Bands” and later with his sons Alec and James. Sid played the kettle drum and all the boys competed for the honour of carrying the musicians’ music into the N.L.A.S. grounds during the fair.

Next to McLean’s Bake Shop was Stafford’s grocery and liquor store and further down John McKinnon’s grocery and liquor store. In April of 1954 McLean’s bakery and confectionery business which had operated in the town of Almonte for over 65 years on Mill Street had come to an end.

almontegree.jpg
Photo- Linda Seccaspina editing from a photo from Up the Line by Steve Evans

The store and residence long owned by Albert J. McLean has been sold to William J. Green. Mr. McLean, Sid as he was familiarly known, established his baking business in a frame building on the corner of Mill and Brae Streets years ago. He later moved and erected the brick’ residence and store occupied by the family ever since he opened for business in 1907.

Two sons, Alex and Jim, became associated in the business after they left school. Jim recalls the days when he delivered bread with a horse and sleigh. The streets were not plowed then and he had to trudge many blocks through snow drifts with a basket on his arm to distribute the loaves and other products of the bakery to his customers.

Bread sold then at six cents a loaf or 17 tickets for a dollar. The new tenants of the Mill Street house and store were the William Green family. Mr. Green was a retired insurance salesman. Mrs. Green and two sons, Don and Morris were engaged in the upholstery business which would be carried on in the lower section of the newly-acquired property.

5368-79 Archibald McLEAN, 28, baker, Almonte, same, s/o Alexander McLEAN & Catherine LAWSON, married Ellen RALPH, 28, Joliette Que., Almonte, d/o Richard TAYLOR (sic) & Eliza, witn: Richard SHILSON & Margaret BOWES, both of Almonte, 13 March 1879 at Almonte

Adding to the Past- Morris Green from Almonte

Almonte 1859 Business Directory

A Name on a Sign –Thomas J. Reid Almonte

Mr. Young and Mr. Bond- Almonte History 1870s

McAdams Store Almonte

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Comments about the Canadian Cafe Almonte — Low Family

Debby Curry — Bringing Home the Bread

Standard
Debby Curry — Bringing Home the Bread

70616911_460163571507323_5021606647869472768_n.jpg

 

70616911_460163571507323_5021606647869472768_n (1).jpg

Thanks Debby Curry for sending this. I noticed your post today, thought i would share this, if you would like to post. This is my grandfather’s family.

Sorry about the small type– Put two sizes..

relatedreading

 

Living with the Natives — Mrs Copithorne’s Bread

The Little Door by the River

    1. Lanark County Recipes Beaver Tail and Muskrat — No thanks LOL

    2. Could This Be the Best Banana Bread Ever?

    3. Old fashioned Raisin Bread WITH ZEST

    4. Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

    5. Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

      Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

      Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

      Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

      Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

      Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

      Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Bake the World a Better Place!

Standard
Bake the World a Better Place!

 

Screenshot 2018-03-19 at 14

 (H.Moulton Collection, Smiths Falls)

Food was just as expensive for the early settlers as it is now. Baking was often delivered personally to homes by bakers or pastry cooks. Families could prepare their own bread and cakes in their own ovens, or have it baked professionally in a bake house.  Cakes were cooked in closed, cast iron ranges by the 1850s. Originally ranges were all coal-based, but then gas versions became available, but were considered very dangerous. The family coal budget was one of the issues that led to making these choices of what to buy from the baker, or make yourself.

In 1835 B. F. Heath of Smiths Falls was listed as opening a bakery at the end of the bridge opposite Ward’s Mills at the corner of Beckwith and Water Street (Chambers Street). It was said that Mr. Heath made bread, biscuits, crackers and other confectioneries that any sweet tooth might demand. It wasn’t cheap-getting supplies, it was difficult, and various grades of flour, classes of butter, and different kinds of sugar, and eggs needed to be fresh and fruit needed to be of the best quality. So bakeries came and went because of the intensive labour, costs and lack of supplies.
To the south of the grist mill in Smiths Falls was once Durant’s Pool Room. The one-storey
frame building which was owned by Mahlon Durant was built in 1909, and an addition  was put on later on the back end of the structure. Durant worked for the CPR until he lost an arm in a railroad accident in 1910 and had to retire. Mahlon became a tobacco merchant along with a confectionery store until his death in January of 1932. The building remained there until 1925 when the Old Home Week Committee wanted the land for a park site.

South of Durant’s Pool Room was a bakery. The original construction date is unknown, but Alexander Wood had planned such a building before his death in 1895 and the building must post-date that event. It was a one and one half storey frame building with a small addition on the south end.

The bakery was connected with the grist mill, and for a time it was operated by Mrs. Wood. It was possible the building was removed at the same time as Durant’s Pool Room. Beside the bakery was a double house and across the road from the bakery was a blacksmith shop. No one knows when Mrs. Wood closed down, but she too likely closed for the same reasons as her predecessors.

The bakers and confectionery makers came and went like the wind through the 1800s, but soon Davidson’s Bakery opened in 1890,  and brought the use of baking machinery to the area which made baked goods at an economical cost. Once upon a time Davidson’s was the largest commercial bakery in eastern Ontario, and it was a place Smiths Falls local residents could have a lifetime career. They served the area until 1994 when beloved delivery driver Mr. Johnson delivered his last load of bread.

An empty bakeshop on King Street was used by by Kezia Lewis and Margaret McMullen in 1910 who then persuaded the local Methodist church to organize a Sunday School for the young children of the area who were destitute. In 1914 the former bakeshop was vacated and Wesley Hall was built to accommodate the children on the the corner of King and Empress Street. The teachers from Elgin were recorded in the media that because of the Sunday School run by the women some poorer children had a better chance at life.

 

 - BAKER'S HELPER, AT LEAST 3 years' experience,...

July 15, 1966

In the 50s and 60s Flann’s Bakery was once a high point in Smiths Falls. Mrs. Flann was oriignally Evelyn Edith Patterson of the Patterson Funeral Home family in Carleton Place, and some locals still remember her today. Darlene Findlay from  Darlene’s Café and Bakery on Main Street W. had high hopes in 2009, but once the Smiths Falls Hershey Candy factory closed Findlay was selling fewer of her famous lemon meringue pies and closed.

But tradition continues, and now Smiths Falls has a couple of locally owned bakeries: C’est Tout and Noal Pantry are keeping the area sugar coated and making sure that the local population can have their cake and eat it too.

 

 - IN SMITHS FALLS FORMERLY Flann'l Bofceryi comer...

July 16, 1969

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

 

 

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

 

Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

Standard
Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

 

147-1c3ab3c8da.jpg

Primitive Stoneware Bottles of Canada Photo–Other bottles in his collection are marked “JL” which, he says, stands for James Laurie and later Jane Laurie, his wife. James Laurie was a baker, confectioner and later lunchroom owner from 1858 to 1925.

 

 - . Perth whisky had a wide reputation; a more...

 

September 1925 Perth Courier – MRS. JANE LAURIE retired from business.  Laurie’s Ginger Beer, in the stone bottles, was once one of Perth’s popular drinks.  Mrs. Laurie passed away in a few months after retiring.

 

 - V MRS. t. lAVRlH ' ' TIews has reached the...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Nov 1925, Fri,  Page 13


The 1871 federal census lists James Laurie, a 33 year old baker, born in Ontario, of Scottish descent. Upon James’ death, it appears that his widow Jane assumed the proprietorship of the business.”Mrs. Jane Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery was located on Gore Street in Perth. The three-storey white brick building was erected in 1886 as a store with residence above.

Baking and candy making were done in the basement, where the bake ovens were situated. The store was elegantly furnished with mahogany shelving and counters, topped with solid walnut. Adjoining the store was a neat restaurant in which oysters, ice cream and fruit were served in season, together with bread, cakes and pastry.

A favourite lunch consisted of buns and chunks of local cheese, with a bottle of Mrs. Laurie’s Old English Ginger Beer. The Laurie business was established in 1858 and was operated by Mrs. Jane Laurie and her daughter, Mrs. Margaret MacCormack, for 67 years. Following her daughter’s sudden death in 1925, Mrs. Laurie sold the business. She died later that same year, on November 11, 1925 at the age of 90 years.-Primitive Stoneware Bottles of Canada

 

145-50a2a4feb3.jpg

 

Primitive Stoneware Bottles of Canada Photo

 

 - MALE HELP WANTED 3 AUTOMOBILE SPEC1 AL...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 May 1924, Fri,  Page 21

 

This article comes from an issue of a local Perth newspaper

 

Jane Laurie – A Sweet Merchant

The buildings in town record the name of many of the major retailers … Shaw, James Brothers, Code … but what must have been one of Perth’s unique stores is not even recognized with a plaque.

Jane Laurie opened “Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery” in 1858. She would soon bring her daughter into the business and it would remain open for 67 years until 1925 when she sold the business. Jane was still in the store working in her 90th year.

The stories she must have witnessed, the history that passed by the door to her shop: the wide-eyed, nose-pressed-to-the-window children who one year were buying penny candy and who went on to do great things for Perth and Canada.

This would be a special story and a unique window on our heritage.

LAURIE, James A.; Fruits & confectionery……………………Gore, PERTH
LAURIE, James, Mrs.; Baker & confectioner…………………..Gore, PERTH—LANARK COUNTY– COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY — 1881/2

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Standard

roywood

woo1.jpg

woodd

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Standard

Please note–Trying hard here to piece things together– but if their are any errors, omissions or additions, please tell me.

Please see *Jaan Kolk’s comments at the end. This would be my second encounter with Jaan Kolk in 2016 when I did this. FIVE years ago and have learned a lot from him.

I rescue photos and find the families and document them. This was my first estate sale buy.

The Aitkenhead Scotch Bakery in Ottawa was owned by Scottish immigrant George Aitkenhead in the late 1800’s- early 1900’s. It was situated on McLaren Street until the great fire of Ottawa/ Hull and then moved to Bank Street. After he moved to his new spot business was not great, so he moved out west. His son Robert moved to Carleton Place to 20 Frank Street and Robert Jr.later moved to Almonte.

 

watercp99

Aitkenhead Bakery Ottawa, Ontario

watercp3

Aitkenhead Ottawa, Ontario

watercp4

Aitkenhead Ottawa, Ontario

The North Lanark Regional Museum has absolutely nothing on The Almonte Bakery and is excited to get these for their archives. I could not find a mention anywhere until Lanark County Genealogical Society president Jayne Munro-Ouimet sent me a message today.

“Linda, you mentioned this family moved to Almonte and opened a Bakery. The bakery was located on Queen St and right next door to the current Menzies House Bed and Breakfast . The bakery was on the first floor and the Atinkhead’s lived upstairs. As a youngster Saturday morning trips from our Ramsay Township Farm to Almonte for Fresh Bread and ooh those famous “Butterfly Buns” will never be forgotten. Today many years later, I still remember that bakery’s smell of cinnamon and fresh bread… Makes me homesick when I walk past those St. Cinnamon shops in the big city. Mrs. Atinkhead should have taught the St. Cinnamon bakers how to bake!”

watercp100

Aitkenhead – The Almonte Bakery Ontario, Queen Street–Betty Lalonde’s wedding cake

watercp111

Robert Aitkenhead – The Almonte Bakery Ontario, Queen Street January 1953

watercp113

Robert Aitkenhead –  The Almonte Bakery Ontario,Queen Street

Robert (Dad), Delmer Royce, Millie Aitkenhead rolling buns.

watercp112

Aitkenhead – The Almonte Bakery Ontario,Queen Street 1969

watercp114

Aitkenhead – The Almonte Bakery Ontario,Queen Street 1969 (Look at the building across the street)

PLEASE NOTE-

The photos from the Millie Aikenhead Collection as I call it will be split between the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum (Carleton Place Photos) and the North Lanark Regional Museum (Almonte Photos)

I try and save old photos after I share them with the world as I feel no one will appreciate them if they sit unseen. If you read My Family in a Box story those pictures are now in the save keeping of Archives Lanark.

Related reading:

 

What Happened to the House and Family on Frank Street –Part 1

The Aitkenhead Family at 20 Frank Street in Carleton Place

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Hog’s Back Falls Ottawa –Aitkenhead Photo Collection

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

No Banker Left Behind – Bank of Montreal Almonte Photos

Down by the Mississippi River- Almonte Falls Photos 50s

 

 

historicalnotes

*Jaan Kolk— Linda, the early genealogy and Ottawa history in your article is a bit off. Robert Stephenson Aitkenhead (~1901-1978), father of Mildred (Mrs. Roy Woodcock) was the son of David Aitkenhead (~1863-1945) who came to Ottawa from Scotland in 1887. Both David and a George J. Aitkenhead operated bakeries separately in Ottawa 1899-1908, and I believe they were related. They appeared in Ottawa about the same time, and David also named his other son George J – but I have not found a close family connection. See also my comments where your photo is shared on Lost Ottawa‘s timeline. Here is the obituary of Robert Stephenson Aitkenhead from the Ottawa Citizen, July 3, 1978:

obit22

 

 

From Jaan Kolk– 2016

Here is a more accurate history of the Aitkenhead bakers of Ottawa. About 1887, two brothers David Aitkenhead (1863-1945) and George Jeffrey Aitkenhead (1859-1940) emigrated to Ottawa. They were sons of retired Glasgow baker Alexander Aitkenhead. Both worked innitially for RE & JC Jamieson, Grocers and Bakers. Each operated a production bakery in Ottawa beginning about 1899; David at 95 Turner (now Cambridge St) and George at 517 Mcleod. Each also had a storefront confectionery on Bank St. at different times. It was George’s shop at 217 Bank St. 1906-1908 that was called “Aitkenhead’s Scotch Bakery.” George and his family left Ottawa in 1908 for the US, settling ultimately in Omaha, Nebraska. David remained in Ottawa, and it was the children of David’s son Robert Stephenson Aitkenhead (~1901-1978) who ended up in Carleton Place and Almonte. Mildred Aitkenhead, who married Roy Woodcock of Carleton Place, was Robert’s daughter and David’s granddaughter

 

Llew Lloyd –The bakery on Bridge Street in Carleton Place called Woodcocks became Aitkenheads and Millie Aitkenhead married a Woodcock .

 

 

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Oct 1906, Fri  •  Page 12–