Tag Archives: Baker

What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

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What do the Darou Family of Bakers and Minnie the Hooker Have in Common?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 Oct 1933, Tue  •  Page 21

I write about community and the history these folks gave us. Sometimes great little stories pop up while you are researching. I was doing a typical geneaology page for the Darou’s and Dunlops who had Darou’s Bakery on Bridge Street in Carleton Place when I came up with Minnie the Hooker’s story. Everyone needs to be remembered so now Minnie is with great joy and happiness.

Where was Darou’s?

Ray PaquetteBeginning at the bottom of Bridge Street in Carleton Place, on the west side: the Texaco station, the Salvation Army Citadel, Levines, Hick’s Grocery, Charlie Jay Shoe Repair, Mae Mulvey’s Candy Shop. Central Grill, Galvin’s Men’s Wear, Carleton Grill ( and the Colonial Bus Lines stop), the Roxy Theatre, Harold Dowdall’s Barbersop, Denny Coyles Esso, Ned Root’s Shoe Repair, Stanzel’s Taxi, Dr. McDowell, Darou’s Bakery. Doucette Insurance, McAllister’s Bike Repair, Oona’s Applicances/Bob Flint TV, Hastie Bros Plumbing, Bruce McDonald Optometrist, Foote Photography, the public restrooms, the Queens Hotel, Woodcock’s Bakery, Lewis Reg’d Ladies Wear, Okilman’s, and Patterson’s Furniture. I probably forgot a business but I’m sure other readers can “fill in the blanks” or take exception to some of the names on the list. More to come when I crossover to the East side of bridge…

BAKERS.
BOWLAND, R. H., Bell street.
DAROU, MRS. A., Bridge street.
JENKINS, W., High street.
SWAN, JOHN, Bridge street.-Carleton Place 1903 Business Directory –Names Names Names

34 Bridge Street Carleton Place The Little Red Brick House
This brick building was built circa 1900 and was the home of Thomas Stevenson and his half sister, Miss Brisland. They took up residence in the early 1930s and first operated the little store next door later known the Central Candy Store, but it was called Thomas Stevenson Grocery. When they extended the store to make living quarters, they sold the little red brick house.
Prior to Mr. Stevenson living here one of the Burgess’s and *John Darou lived here. The parents of Jack the Kidd and *Velma Bryce, Mr. and Mrs. Bracewell, lived in this building as well as Alex and Viola Watson and Mrs. McEwan.
116 Bridge Street  Circa 1870
116 Bridge Street was the home of the Darou’s bakery for approximately sixteen years. Darou’s bakery was later operated by Minnie who was the daughter of the Darou’s and Earl Dunlop. It was under the ownership of the Dunlop’s up until 1957 when Nat Nelson purchased the building and operated a delicatessen with his wife bought the building. The Bridge Street store used to be the home base for Nate’s Delicatessen, which was run by Nelson’s parents. Paul took over when his dad died and operated a photography shop. Paul Nelson cherished, long time member of the Carleton Place Community, passed away Monday, February 28, 2011.
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1922, Fri  •  Page 6

Who was Minnie the Hooker?

By Garry Bouey Citizen staff writer

Nobody can accuse Minnie Dunlop of misspending her youth. Sure, she shoots pool a couple of times a week and may go dancing once or twice or play bingo. But after all, Minnie is almost 82 and times have changed. Minnie, who lives in a senior citizens’ high rise on MacLaren Street, looks quite comfortable with a pool cue in her hand. “C’mon baby, c’mon baby,” she says, urging the brown ball to its intended destination. “They call me Minnie the Hooker,” she says, and quickly adds an explanation: in snooker, you “hook” your opponents by leaving them without a shot. Not every ball makes it, of course. Snooker is a demanding game and Minnie didn’t take it up until last fall. “My oldest son is 53,” says Minnie, “and when he found out he said ‘Mother, don’t tell me. I never thought I’d live to see the day you’d be playing pool’.

The Dunlops operated Darou’s Bakery in Carleton Place until 1953 and lived across the street from a pool hall. If you read below her husband was also the mayor of Carleton Place at one point. ( Read-Tales From McCann’s Pool Room – Rob Probert) Minnie remembers hauling her sons home by the ear after rescuing them from the evils of pool-playing. Now she shoots in a seven-team house league and enjoys it immensely. “I like anything where there’s competition,” she says. “I bowled until this winter but it got too cold to go out. With pool, I can play right in the building.” With partner John Beaulieu, Minnie leads the other six mixed teams in the league, organized . by fellow-resident Maurice Trudeau, Ottawa’s senior citizen snooker champ last year. Next year, Trudeau hopes his league can play off with representatives from other seniors’ buildings. No doubt Minnie will be there.

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada29 Mar 1979, Thu  •  Page 1

Jamie DunlopThere were stories about how my dad and brothers and sister worked in the bakery when they were growing up. They delivered bread by horse and cart when they were kids. It was quite a shock to see Minnie on Facebook playing pool. I have the Citizen picture and article from when it came out in the 80s(?). She was no shrinking violet for sure. Thanks for the interest.

Minnie the Hooker’s Husband CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Sep 1960, Mon  •  Page 12

Family

John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Diane JudgeMy Mom’s parents were Ida and Charles Darou, owned the dairy in Lanark, my grandmother Ida would order meat & food from there, and they delivered to the Darou home , next to the machine shop, which they owned as well.– read John A Darou 1905 Lanark Village

Upper George Street, Lanark, shop of John P. Leslie, wagon maker. The shop did buggy repairs, general, built new wheels, etc. and was also an agency for the machinery shown in front. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie lived above the shop at the time. Next is the home of James Darou and next the Labelle home–.

Janet LockyerI remember some Darou’s of Lanark, in the late 1960s, dad build a cottage on the Clyde river, near the bridge dump. Jim Darou and sons had a cottage down at the point and Jim and my dad sure managed to get into some fun situations.. Thanks for giving me these memories back, had a chuckle remembering. There was one time that my dad, from the city, went off with Jim Darou to get corn for a corn roast. Jim been the leader of this expeditation, said why pay for corn, he knew where they could get it for nothing. Off they go, hours later they return, muddy, dad pants were torn up and they are laughing away. Jim took dad to a farmer’s field, surrounded by barber wire of course. They climbed the wire got lots of “free” corn. We boiled it up, smothered it with butter and salt and nearly broke our teeth trying to eat it. Dad and Jim just laughed and laughed watching us trying to eat COW corn. There really is a difference between the corn, one for humans and one for cows.

Paul MilotteI remember it being called the Cow bridge as well. If memory serves me right it was used to let Cows cross the river as part of the old Plant farm. It was a huge dairy farm back in the day and the Darou family dairy business bought milk from them. The main building of the Plant farm is the old Caldwell mansion that is now a bead and breakfast. Anybody remember the Red barn behind the main house? I think the same family converted the the old mansion into a nursing home after the farming operation had stopped.-Primitive Bridges –Where was this Bridge?

staff at Darou’s-
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Mar 1939, Thu  •  Page 21

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

What do McLean’s Bakery and Morris Green Have in Common?

Aitkenhead Bakery Ottawa, OntarioBefore there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

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Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

 

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Primitive Stoneware Bottles of Canada Photo–Other bottles in his collection are marked “JL” which, he says, stands for James Laurie and later Jane Laurie, his wife. James Laurie was a baker, confectioner and later lunchroom owner from 1858 to 1925.

 

 - . Perth whisky had a wide reputation; a more...

 

September 1925 Perth Courier – MRS. JANE LAURIE retired from business.  Laurie’s Ginger Beer, in the stone bottles, was once one of Perth’s popular drinks.  Mrs. Laurie passed away in a few months after retiring.

 

 - V MRS. t. lAVRlH ' ' TIews has reached the...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Nov 1925, Fri,  Page 13


The 1871 federal census lists James Laurie, a 33 year old baker, born in Ontario, of Scottish descent. Upon James’ death, it appears that his widow Jane assumed the proprietorship of the business.”Mrs. Jane Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery was located on Gore Street in Perth. The three-storey white brick building was erected in 1886 as a store with residence above.

Baking and candy making were done in the basement, where the bake ovens were situated. The store was elegantly furnished with mahogany shelving and counters, topped with solid walnut. Adjoining the store was a neat restaurant in which oysters, ice cream and fruit were served in season, together with bread, cakes and pastry.

A favourite lunch consisted of buns and chunks of local cheese, with a bottle of Mrs. Laurie’s Old English Ginger Beer. The Laurie business was established in 1858 and was operated by Mrs. Jane Laurie and her daughter, Mrs. Margaret MacCormack, for 67 years. Following her daughter’s sudden death in 1925, Mrs. Laurie sold the business. She died later that same year, on November 11, 1925 at the age of 90 years.-Primitive Stoneware Bottles of Canada

 

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Primitive Stoneware Bottles of Canada Photo

 

 - MALE HELP WANTED 3 AUTOMOBILE SPEC1 AL...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 May 1924, Fri,  Page 21

 

This article comes from an issue of a local Perth newspaper

 

Jane Laurie – A Sweet Merchant

The buildings in town record the name of many of the major retailers … Shaw, James Brothers, Code … but what must have been one of Perth’s unique stores is not even recognized with a plaque.

Jane Laurie opened “Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery” in 1858. She would soon bring her daughter into the business and it would remain open for 67 years until 1925 when she sold the business. Jane was still in the store working in her 90th year.

The stories she must have witnessed, the history that passed by the door to her shop: the wide-eyed, nose-pressed-to-the-window children who one year were buying penny candy and who went on to do great things for Perth and Canada.

This would be a special story and a unique window on our heritage.

LAURIE, James A.; Fruits & confectionery……………………Gore, PERTH
LAURIE, James, Mrs.; Baker & confectioner…………………..Gore, PERTH—LANARK COUNTY– COMMERCIAL DIRECTORY — 1881/2

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

Where was Bay View House in Appleton?

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Where was Bay View House in Appleton?

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  20 Nov 1897, Sat,  Page 2

 

 

The history of Appleton’s hotels in not well documented. It appears that Appleton had at least two hotels on the East side of the River. One was opposite the cheese factory and the other was opposite the general store. The hotels provided a place for the mill owners to entertain salesmen, a place for travellers to sleep, and served as the local watering hole.

In his book, Historical Sketches of Appleton, Jack Brown makes several mentions of Appleton hotels included:

In 1871 a Mr. Michael Brennan was Appleton’s hotel keeper.
In 1897 Mr. Baker changed the name of his hotel from Appleton House to Bay View House.
In 1904 Mr. Thomas C. Arthur sold the hotel to a Mr. Wellington Spearman.–North Lanark Regional Museum

Divided down the centre by the Mississippi River, the community of Appleton has always depended on a bridge to fully connect the community. Over the years a variety of bridges have been constructed in Appleton.

 

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Credits:North Lanark Regional Museum (2012.87.2)

 

In 1899 tragedy struck when the bridge gave way and killed two men (see related reading). By 1900 a new bridge had been constructed and was in use. Appleton’s current bridge was built in the 1950s and is almost unanimously considered an eyesore among the local residents.-North Lanark Regional Museum

 

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Credits:North Lanark Regional Museum (2012.88.13) Donated by Communications Canada, Government of Canada

 

Just a short walk away from the Appleton Boat Launch one comes across a cement table and chairs looking out on the Mississippi River. This quiet retreat was constructed in memory of Brian Cole (Sept. 02 1990 to Jan 10, 2003) Grandson of Delbert & Vera Cole, Appleton Village, by the Appleton Community Association and Friends.

Several community hall buildings stood at this location over the years. The community hall was an important part of Appleton’s social life. The hall was host to 4-H meetings, films, dances, junior farmers, women’s institute, and school plays among other things. The community hall also held the WWII Honor Roll which commemorated all those who had served and those who had died from Appleton during WWII.–North Lanark Regional Museum

 

historicalnotes

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Feb 1897, Wed,  Page 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Nov 1899, Sat,  Page 12

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading.jpg

Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

 

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Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

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24440081_1.jpgOntario Trade Tokens, Lanark County – Lot of 19 Bakery and Dairy Tokens. The first one is 1900’s H.R.Bowland,Carleton Place,Ontario Bread/Bakery Token jt124- the second one is As 0260a, High Street Bakery, Carleton Place, 1 loaf, which was probably the Jenkins bakery.

 

The H. R. Bowland Bakery was listed in 1911 as a highly established bakery on Bridge Street. Bread, fancy and plain biscuits pastry of all kinds were all baked on the premises and in high demand because of their attractive appearance and digestible character.

 

McRostie Bowland Building 2015

 

The bakery had gained a high reputation for the beauty and delicacy of its ornamental work and also for its wedding cakes. A choice line of groceries, confectionery fruits and tobacco were also for sale. Bowland was noted for showing off his fine chocolates and bonbons, and all sorts of homemade candy. He employed a number of local bakers and was equipped with a wagon for daily home deliveries.

The locals raved about Bowland’s bakery which is a good things as a bad review is like baking a cake with all the best ingredients and having someone sit on it.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

Photo description

Ontario Trade Tokens, Lanark County – Lot of 19 Bakery and Dairy Tokens

Includes: As 0250a, H.R. Bowland, Carleton Place, 1 loaf, al, Unc; As 0260a, High Street Bakery, Carleton Place, 1 loaf, Al., AU; As 1310a, Mayne’s Bakery, Pakenham, 1 Roll Bread, al, EF; W.A. McLaren, Perth, 1 loaf, Al., VF+; As 1368a, Hieatt’s Bakery, Perth, 1 loaf, Al., VF; Perth Dairy, 1 quart, Al., red, BU; 1 quart, top hole, Al., red, Unc; Clark’s Ideal Dairy, Smiths Falls, 1 quart, Al., EF; Purity milk, Smiths Falls, 1 quart, lg. triangle, Al., EF; 1 quart, sm. triangle, Al., EF; Smiths Falls Dairy, 1 quart, Al., BU; Standard Dairy, Smiths Falls, 1 pint, Al., Unc; Tye’s Dairy, Smiths Falls, 1 quart, triangle, Al., red, Unc; 1 quart, cow’s head, Al., red, VF+; 1 quart, w/o apostrophe in Tyes, Al., red, AU; 1 quart 2%, Al., scalloped, BU; 2 quarts milk, Al., blue, VF+; 2 quarts milk, Al., brown, EF; 3 quart jug Homo, al, plain, Unc. 19 Pcs.

  • Woodrow –  Bowland

    St. James Anglican church at Carleton Place was the setting for the marriage at noon today of Miss Eva Marie Bowland of Ottawa, daughter of Mr. H. R. Bowland and the late Mrs. Bowland of Carleton Place, to Corporal Frederick Arthur Woodrow, R.C.A.F., of Ottawa, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Woodrow of Toronto. Rev. Thomas Iveson officiated at the wedding, which took place at twelve o’clock. The bride was given in marriage by her father and the witnesses were Mrs. Roy Perry, sister of the groom, and Mr. David Bowland, brother of the bride.

    A beige redincote ensemble of karo crepe was worn by the bride, the yoke of the dress and the lapels of the coat being of brown eyelet embroidered crepe. Her halo-effect was of brown fur felt, with a nose veil and she wore a corsage bouquet of Better Time roses and cornflowers.

    A reception was held following the ceremony at the home of Mrs. Austin Wright in Carleton Place. Corporal and Mrs. Woodrow will motor to Lake Simcoe for their honeymoon and on their return take up residence on Pretoria Avenue in Ottawa. For travelling the bride chose a tea rose jersey dress, a brown hat and brown accessories and a corsage bouquet of roses.

The following is transcribed from Google News:

Ottawa Citizen – July 24, 1937
OBITUARY
Former Resident of Carleton Place Dies
Special to The Citizen
Carleton Place, July 23 — H. R. Bowland has just received word announcing the passing of his brother-in-law, Lieut. Col. Joseph Mackay, retired fuel agent of the Great Northern Railway, at his home in Seattle, Wash. He had been seriously ill for some time previous to his death, so that his passing was not altogether unexpected. Lieut. Col. Mackay was a former resident of Carleton Place and is well known throughout the Ottawa Valley.

Deceased was born in Ireland and as a child came to Canada with his parents who settled first in Kingston. Later the family moved to Carleton Place where Mr. Mackay embarked in the bakery business which he carried on for several years until the time of his death. His son Joseph was educated here and as a young man learned the baking business with his father, later succeeding him and carrying on until about 1900 when he went to Esquimalt, B.C.

As a young man Jospeh Mackay took a keen interest in military affairs and was early connected with 42nd Battalion, Lanark and Renfrew Regiment. Military affairs appealed strongly to him and he steadily rose from the ranks, became an officer and on his removal to Esquimalt was placed in command of the garrison there.

At the beginning of the war Lt. Col. Mcakay organized the 107th East Kootenay Regiment and later was placed in full charge of operations in British Columbia. He then raised and had command of the 225th C.E.F. At the close of the was he was appointed by the United States government as administrator of mines for the state of Montana.

Boland Genealogy–click here

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The Ottawa Journal, 3 Jan 1942, SatPage 6

 

 

Related reading

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery