Tag Archives: artist

People of Our Town — Mary Jenkins 1980

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People of Our Town — Mary Jenkins 1980

Mary B Jenkins has lived in Almonte for eight years Things have not been easy years for the young mother of two, transplanted from the shores of Massachusetts and who still misses the sounds and smells of the sea, but Mary Jenkins has in many ways made her plate.

Others this summer will show their pleasure and loyalty to Almonte during the hectic ten days of celebrations planned for Homecoming week August  10, but Mary Jenkins has chosen a more personal way to pay tribute to her adopted town. For the past few months Mary has been exercising the vocation that brings her more satisfaction than any other – the vocation of artist She has produced a series of pen and ink drawings depicting 40 local landmarks, both old and new.

These have been printed as hasty note stationary and are now on sale in eight local stores Mary hopes they will appeal not only to the passing tourist, but also to local residents to whom the scenes are as familiar as daily life. Mary Jenkins’ style is not strictly realistic; on the contrary, she sketches how she sees the world about her with a great deal of feeling the cards at the same time are evidently drawn with their function in mind, they are highly decorative and nostalgic.

Mary Jenkins has strived to include all the standard landmarks that we think of in connection with Almonte; the old post office, the townhall, the Auld Kirk, and all the local churches But she has also drawn subjects that, while familiar to us, we might not have considered artistic material. Mary’s decorative touch however, has formed even such mundane sights as the arena and the newer public schools, into warm pieces o f nostalgia.

The mixture of new and old is very satisfying. Views that stand out are, for instance, of the Dalai Lama Bakery, The Almonte Gazette office, the Hub, the Superior Restaurant These views make many common sights in Almonte seem worth preserving and appreciating.

“The drawings were my way of saying thank you to the town ol Almonte, my way of doing something for the people,” said Mary in an interview last week Mary Jenkins lives with her husband, a mathematical genius, she says, and her two children, in a house the couple designed themselves Robert Jenkins is also an arnst; he paints abstract paintings and has shown them in galleries in Ottawa. 

The Jenkins came here when Robert was hired to work in applied math for Ihe federal government they had met in New Haven. Connecticut, at an exhibition Mary Jenkins says there are many types of art she would like to do. She has worked timing maps and other graphic works, making prints, and is even now designing decorations lor next Christmas She is also drawn to literature, and a few years ago wrote a regular column called ” Inner thoughts” for ihe Carleton Place Canadian, which she also illustrated with line drawings. Today the Jenkins arc devout Christians, a faith they have found has changed their lives and seen them through many spiritual hard times.

All illustrations Mary Jenkins Almonte Gazette 1980
1980
1980

Found the Artist–Vera Alice Shaw (Morrison)– Lanark Children’s Haven

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

Mary Bell-Eastlake Almonte Artist- Allan Stanley

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

The Female Artist from Carleton Place That Never Went Viral

Bea Gladish — Artist — Looking for some Information for her Granddaughter

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Bea Gladish — Artist — Looking for some Information for her Granddaughter

I love this photo of Max and Bea Gladish from the St. James Directory with a photo of her daughter Krista behind them. Bea always had hugs and kind words for me when life wasn’t going the right way, and I miss seeing her in the front left hand pew at church. Max would sometimes whisper softly to me in church asking for a pie or something for a fundraiser. What I guess I missed was that she was quite the artist and we are looking for some information if you can help.

This morning I got an email from her granddaughter, Andy Penson. I told her that I knew her Grandmother well and I knew we could all send some love and maybe some information to her.

Hi!

I thought I’d be able to post in this group. I was looking for information about my grandmothers paintings. I know she painted a lot and has many paintings through out Carlton Place but I don’t have any myself! I was hoping to learn more about my grandmother and see what paintings she has out there. Her name was Beatrice Gladish. She went by Bea, but I don’t know how she signed her paintings. She lived in Carlton Place and lived with my grandfather Max Gladish.

She was an amazing person!! She really taught me about love and community, but wasn’t painting much since I’ve been around. We miss her so much. Thank you for posting this! –Andy Penson

A nice photo of the late Bea Gladish Krista Gladish Penson
Thanks to Doris Blackburn/ Karen Blackburn Chenier Heritage days Caldwell 1991

Sandra RattrayShe was a very nice lady. I bought her bicycle a number of years ago. It had hardly been used and I didn’t use it much.

Barbara PurdySorry to hear this. She was a lovely lady.

Debra J DavidsonShe was a member of our Auxiliary. Lovely lady.

Tim CampbellWe knew Bea, Max and Krista very well and I used to see Bea when she was at the Manor. She was a terrific lady. She will be missed by us all.

Rose Mary SarsfieldShe was a lovely lady!

Bea Gladish photo- granddaughter Andy Penson

So can we help Andy with memories for her granddaughter?

Thank you

Linda

The Art of Blaine Cornell

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The Art of Blaine Cornell
TRINA MCMILLAN CONBOY
January 18 ·
Blaine was an amazing artist. My Dad has had Blaine paint several special paintings for us over the years. This is one of my favourites.
Joann Voyce
Just last summer I got one of Blaine’s paintings at our class of 59 annual reunion. In our wilder days, Blaine was the bouncer between us and the Chief of Police. When we partied too hard, he would receive a call from his dad to settle us down before his dad would have to do it himself. Of course we obeyed instantly. LOL –Joann Voyce
Here are two painting that Blaine Cornell sold to me a few years ago! I had known Blaine from 5 years of age and had no idea he was an artist! I saw his paintings on display at Ballygiblins…. bought one And asked him if he had more…. I decided on the CP train station. I jad grabbed the snowscape off the wall at Ballygiblins! So talented!!!– Sylvia Giles

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
February 8, 2014  ·   · 

Some came with their own hat…
— with Shane Wm Edwards and Blaine Cornell.

last picture I rook of Blaine– Mississippi Mudds

Read more here..

A Few Memories of Blaine Cornell

Found the Artist–Vera Alice Shaw (Morrison)– Lanark Children’s Haven

Getting the Family Paintings Home– Dr. Harold Box

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

Mary Bell-Eastlake Almonte Artist- Allan Stanley

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

The Female Artist from Carleton Place That Never Went Viral

Mary Bell-Eastlake Almonte Artist- Allan Stanley

Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum8h · From the artist @tegs.letters: Hello there! My name is Tegan Wong, more commonly known as tegs. I am a self-taught lettering artist living in Ottawa. When the pandemic hit this year, I realized how important it was that I always make time for creativity in my life. Typically I work mostly with typography, however, recently I’ve found passion in drawing buildings as well.I’ve enjoyed capturing the beauty in Carleton Place Town Hall. It was built from 1895-1897 and will always be a strong piece of CP history. I hope that when you see this print, no matter where you are, it reminds you of being home for the holidays.If you’d like to see more of my work, I can be found as tegs.letters on Instagram.

Do you live at 138 Mary Street? Artist Mary Dodge painted this winter scene of your house in 1977. It’s for sale here: http://www.sportsbiz.bz/MaryDodge/gallery/55.htmThe Museum is lucky to have 5 of her local paintings in our collection.

Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

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Gwladys Williams Menzies– Celebrating a Local Girl who Made Good

A project began this year to catalogue the remaining works of Gwladys Williams Menzies, born in Carleton Place in 1891.  Mrs. Menzies was an outstanding china painter and teacher for at least two generations in the Ottawa Valley.  Her pieces were never sold and she never accepted any commissions.  All her remaining pieces belong to family members, unavailable to the public.  Mrs. Menzies daughter is now elderly and very anxious to provide for her mother’s work once she is gone.  

Work was begun in January 2020 by members of the Canadian Ceramics Circle to catalogue the remaining china.  Unfortunately, only two photography sessions took place before the pandemic prevented further access.  With not very much to show for a year of elapsed time, it was decided to use what was available to produce an art calendar to introduce Mrs. Menzies’ remarkable work to the world.

 The calendar is now available and is beautiful.  The first run is already sold out, with a second run expected any day now.  It measures 12 x 12, is coil bound and has large day squares for notes.  The cost is $25.00 each.  And, yes, Mrs. Menzies place of birth, Carleton Place, appears in the calendar text. — Sue Hoegg

If there is any interest for the calendar please let me know.  Let’s put a little sparkle in the season and celebrate a girl who made good.

Gwladys Williams MenziesTeaching privately china painting was a vocation with Gwladys Williams Menzies. She was born in Carleton Place in 1891. At the turn of the century the family moved to Ottawa. Gwladys’s artistic talent found expression in china painting at a relatively early age, and after only a few lessons she set up her own studio. The first pieces she signed are dated 1912, when she was 21. Gwladys soon became the foremost teacher of china painting in the Ottawa area. She produced many complete lunch, tea and dinner sets for her family, but did not accept commissions. Gwladys favoured fine china blanks – usually Limoges, although occasionally she used Beleek or English factories. On completion she signed, dated and numbered each piece chronologically on the back over the glaze. Her first two finished pieces were plates, dated 1912. Her work combines an amazingly skilful technique with originality of design. She painted entirely freehand and loved to paint flowers and butterflies, both true to nature and stylised. But she also produced fine geometric designs showing the influence of Art Nouveau and Art Deco. Gwladys maintained her studio until about 1930 – her last pieces are dated 1933. Gwladys Williams Menzies died in Ottawa in 1977, at the age of 86. (Fig. 8).

From https://sites.google.com/site/handpaintedporcelainincanada/home/hand-painted-china-in-canada Dr. Paul Robertson: China Painting – The Art of Master Painter Gwladys Williams Menzies (exhibition pamphlet), Ottawa, 1999.

Fig. 8 – Similar cups and saucers with butterflies, one signed M.S.C. / 1936 – Ottawa in front of a photograph of a Gwladys Williams Menzies creation from the same period.

photo Fraser Middleton -Gwladys Helena Williams
1891–1977
BIRTH 1891 • Carleton Place, Ontario
DEATH 18 JULY 1977 • Ottowa, Ontario, Canada

When Gwladys Helena Williams was born in 1891 in Carleton Place, Ontario, her father, Hugh, was 32, and her mother, Margaret, was 30. She married John Whyte Menzies on October 6, 1923, in Ontario. They had two children during their marriage. He died on January 21, 1951, at the age of 66, and was buried in Ottawa, Ontario.She died on July 18, 1977, in Ottawa, Ontario, at the age of 86, and was buried there.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1923, Thu  •  Page 6

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Jan 1924, Wed  •  Page 7
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Jan 1924, Sat  •  Page 25
Husband John W. Menzies
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Jul 1977, Tue  •  Page 34
Thomas Anwyl Williams was born on July 19, 1893, in Carleton Place, Ontario, to Margaret Helen Anderson, age 32, and Hugh Matthias Williams, age 33.

MOTHER-Margaret Helen Anderson was born on April 3, 1861, in Almonte, Ontario. She had one daughter with Hugh Matthias Williams in 1891. She died on July 4, 1925, in Kirk’s Ferry, Quebec, at the age of 64

FATHER-Hugh Matthias Williams was born on December 24, 1859, in Pwllheli, Caernarvonshire, Wales. He had one daughter with Margaret Helen Anderson in 1891. He died on November 15, 1931, in Ontario at the age of 71.

photos-Sue Hoegg

Clippings of Elizanne Campbell–Wendy Collens Robinson

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Clippings of Elizanne Campbell–Wendy Collens Robinson

Hello. My Aunt lived in Almonte until her untimely death of car accident. Wondered if you have any info on her. Elizanne Campbell–Wendy Collens Robinson

Aunt Anne was born in Guelph to a school teacher and a nurse, Arthur and Olive Clarry. They had 3 daughters June, Elizabeth Anne and Doris. They lived in Ottawa and Cobalt for a few years but eventually went back to Guelph. Aunt Anne married Frank Campbell who was in the military. She lived all over the world with my Uncle Frank and their 3 children Brad, Cathy and Donna. After Uncle Frank retired from military, he worked with underdeveloped countries with helping children. Aunt Anne was the official artist of the Vietnam war as she was living there at the time. Her artwork reflected the people she lived amongst. There are several pieces from Africa, Vietnam, and Germany, to name a few. When her marriage ended, she lived in Guelph for a while but eventually moved to Ottawa where she got a job at Ottawa University teaching English as a second language.
The city life was hard on her allergies and she moved to Almonte. Her way of living reflected places and people she had met. She loved Almonte as it was very peaceful. She loved to canoe behind her house, loved nature and enjoyed life. She was working on an art show when she died in car accident. She is survived by 2 daughters, and 6 grandchildren and great grandchildren. Also known to many as Elizanne Campbell new Clarry

historicalnotes

Joy Reynolds

Elizanne (Anne Campbell) was my mother-in-law. I went to Ottawa in summer 1972, after completing my first degree. (I am English). My aunt, Kay Peterson,was a close friend of Anne’s and it was through Anne and Frank that I met their son Brad, my late husband. I stayed in Ottawa for 2 years and got to know the family well, although Anne and Frank were in Viet Nam for some of that time. I then returned to England to do a master’s degree and Brad followed me there a couple of years later. He remained in England until his death in 1994.

I remember Anne as a fascinating woman:as elegant and exotic as her art. She was interested not only in art but in philosophy and ideas. My daughter and I still have some of her paintings and drawings.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
21 Sep 1973, Fri  •  Page 25

Getting the Family Paintings Home– Dr. Harold Box

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Getting the Family Paintings Home–  Dr. Harold Box

 

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Here are my grandfather’s art (5 signed Mississippi Lake paintings by Dr. H.K. Box  Carleton  Place Dentist)) that I purchased last week at an auction. (Mary Henry estate on Bell Street in Carleton Place. They may seem fuzzy because they were all in frames……I’m so happy to have brought them back to the family. Enjoy! –-Gary Box

 

 

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Linda Tomosky Box At the auction everyone was quiet when the bidding started and Gary was the only bidder. I think people knew who he is and why he wanted the pictures.

Graeme Box Those are great to see.
I used sit with him at that spot on front of the old cottage and he would teach me how he did them. I still have one l did sitting beside him.

 

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

 

  1. Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USACome and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now.relatedreading

 

relatedreading

A Time of its Own– The Mystery Photo

 

The Short but Illustrious Life of Dr. Daniel Muirhead

What Was it Like Living in Beckwith 1800s? Christina McEwen Muirhead

Christena McEwen– The Belle of Beckwith Part 1 -“The Woodcocks”

Killed by Zulus — Duncan and James Box

Was a Boldt Castle Boathouse Once in our Midst? See the Home of the Daphne!

He Hailed from Carleton Place– Harold Box– The Forgotten Scientist?

“Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead –Box family

McLaren Left it All to the McLeod Sisters–His Maids!

Muirhead Gillies and the Boxes Are All Related–Genealogy and Photos

Did You Ever Notice This in Beckwith Park? Thanks to Gary Box

The McArton’s of Ramsay

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The McArton’s of Ramsay

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Photos of Almonte Bridge by Janet McArton of the 7th line of Ramsay from Marie White of Lanark County Tourism

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 09 May 1933, Tue, Page 11

 I had no idea that Janet McArton was a renowned artist but there is little written about her. If you have any information about her, please do email me. sav_77@yahoo.com

Information from Melissa Alexander from North Lanark Regional Museum

Janet McArton was one of eight children born to John McArton and Mary Ann Houston. Her birth date is a bit hard to pin down, but it seems to be around 1848 and she passed away in Ramsay on May 8, 1933. Her father, John, arrived in Canada in 1829 at 14 years of age with his parents from Glasgow, Scotland and they settled in Dalhousie Township. John then settled in Ramsay Township in the early 1840s and married Mary Ann in 1843. Mary Ann was born in Glasgow as well, and her father, Stewart Houston, was one of the pioneer settlers of Ramsay Township.

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 11 Jul 1933, Tue,
  3. Page 3

John was one of Ramsay’s oldest residents when he died at 84 years of age in 1899. He was well-respected in the community and was a justice of the peace so there’s a bit of a write up about him in the paper. They describe him as “a man of cheerful disposition and bright intellect, [possessing] a wonderful amount of general knowledge, gained through much reading, which rendered him a pleasing and instructive companion and an interesting conversationist, and his stories of incident and adventure of the early pioneer days were always of interest to his hearers. He possessed a warm and loving heart, and a genial disposition, which made him hosts of friends wherever he went.”

Janet and her older sister, Sarah, never married. After both their parents died, they moved in with their younger brother John, who had an adjoining farm. After that, there is very little information about them, except that Sarah was killed by a drunk driver in 1928 when she was leaving church.  (see Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton)

She would have been in her mid-80s at that point.”

 - Mainy Pay Tribute To Mishap Victim One Of...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Aug 1928, Wed,
  3. Page 13

historicalnotes

  1. John McARTON was born in 1815 in Dalhousie Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada1 and died on May 20, 1899 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada1 aged 84.
    John married Mary Ann HOUSTON, daughter of Stuart HOUSTON and Sarah KINCAID, about 1842 in , Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada. Mary was born in 1815 in Glasgow, , Lanark, Scotland1 and died on November 6, 1893 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada1 aged 78.
    Children from this marriage were:

      2 F    i. Sarah E. McARTON was born on February 3, 1844 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.2
      3 M    ii. James McARTON was born in 1847 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.
      4 F    iii. Janet McARTON was born on February 5, 1848 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.3

    + 5 M    iv. Dr. Stuart McARTON was born on July 22, 1852 in Carleton Place, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada,4 died on August 3, 1903 in Paisley, Bruce Co, Ontario, Canada aged 51, and was buried in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.

    + 6 M    v. John McARTON was born on August 21, 1856 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.3
      7 F    vi. Helen McARTON was born in 1862 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.5
    Helen married Stuart HOUSTON, son of John HOUSTON and Marion Selkirk (__?__), on May 11, 1886 in Carleton Place, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.5 Stuart was born in 1863 in Ramsay Twp, Lanark Co, Ontario, Canada.

 - ; Carieton Place (Special to' The JournaL) - ....

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  2. 29 Jan 1898, Sat,
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 - ' Carleljoii Pjaoe : , ' , . .(Special to the "...

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  2. 22 May 1899, Mon,
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 - The Jate John McArton, of Ramsay whose death...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 30 May 1899, Tue,
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 - . IS RE8TIM1 WELL. CARLETON PLACE. Aug. 28....

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 29 Aug 1928, Wed,
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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 21 Jan 1938, Fri,
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 - , Mrs. John McArton CARLETON PLACE, Jan. 28....

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
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 - H. A. McArton Dies In Ottawa Hospital !...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 09 Jan 1943, Sat,
  3. Page 4
  4.  - CRIGGAR GLENNA LOUISE (nee McArton) On...

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  1. The Chilliwack Progress,
  2. 31 Dec 1999, Fri,
  3. Page 20

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Sent to Canada’s Shutter Island for the Death of Sarah McArton

What Happened to the Gold on the Ramsay 7th line?

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

The Female Artist from Carleton Place That Never Went Viral

Ken Bowes of Middleville

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Ken Bowes of Middleville

 

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1978

 

Ken Bowes was just a farmer and carpenter living in Middleville who still used his team of horses when he plowed the land and tended to the sap in the Spring. Ken never thought of making miniatures, but when he saw the tiny wagons and sleighs made by  Bruce White in the 70s he decided to make them too.

Like all of us he thought if someone can make something  he could too, but it soon set in how tedious the work was and how many hours it took. After spending every extra hour on his new hobby Ken thought that he would record exactly how much time he was really devoting. In reality he spent 56 hours to make a tiny double work harness and 63 hours to build the wagon.

But devoting time to something you love was already in the family.  His father James Bowes once spent half a day behind a yoke of a team of oxen plowing in Manitoba. It took time and patience to get used to plowing the fields like that and he said he felt like he was back in biblical times.

Ken like doing things the ‘old-fashioned’ way and born in nearby Gailbraith where he grew up working in lumber camps using the horses he loved to create hauling logs out of the woods. It was in his early occupations that he found out how much enjoyed working with wood, and he could  square lumber with a broad axe with the best of them. This experience went a long way when he began to build log cabins and Ken personally built the family home for his wife Grace and his four daughters.

Those first miniature pieces that Ken made after all those hours ended up once being displayed in the windows of Duncan’s Barbershop in Almonte, Ontario and in the Spring you too can see some of his displays at the Middleville Museum. May Ken rest in peace.

 

 

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Middleville Museum

 

 

 

historicalnotes

Perth Courier

James Bowes was awarded the contract for the erection of a frame building and after a severe misfortune, having a great deal of the material prepared for the erection of the edifice destroyed by fire, the building was completed.

 

 

 

 

 

BOWES, Kenneth Peacefully at Almonte Country Haven on Saturday, August 27th, 2005, J. Kenneth Bowes in his 87th year. Beloved husband of Grace (Caldwell) Bowes. He will be sadly missed by his four daughters, Shirley Botham (Joe), Joyce Farrell (Max), Nora Shorkey (Richard) and Marilyn Bowes-Henry (Rod); cherished grandfather of Monty, Jeff, Stacy (Gary), Sarah (Jeremy), Joey, Whitney, Samantha and Nicholas. Brother of the late Alex, Charlie and Arthur Bowes and Luella Foster. Fondly remembered by his nieces, nephews, family and friends. Friends may pay their respects at the Young Funeral Home, Lanark on Monday, August 29th, 2005 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral service will be held in First Baptist Church, Lanark on Tuesday at 11:00 A.M. Interment, Greenwood Cemetery, Middleville.
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Published in The Ottawa Citizen on Aug. 29, 2005

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

The Art Loan Gallery Perth 1907-Names Names Names

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The Art Loan Gallery Perth 1907-Names Names Names

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Perth Library, c1907, Archives of Ontario

 

Perth Courier, April 2, 1897

The Art Loan Gallery:  This select entertainment came to a close on Monday night and to those who attended one or more times it was very satisfactory.  It gave the people an idea of what good pictures by professional painters looked like and what good paintings our local artists could do.  Unfortunately, the attendance was not as large as generally as to encourage the directors of the public library or the committee to persist in getting such displays of art as this with all the care, trouble etc., involved to educate and amuse the public.  The committee is indebted to a great many owners and artists for the loan of their valuable property and we should say that no better display could be made by any other town in the Ottawa district.  Among the artists and owners of the exhibits were:

 

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*Jacobi

 

 

1)John Hart, oil paintings by Miss Hart—oil painting of grapes by William Hart all of high merit and some fine water colors by Jacobi and Coleman.

2)Henry Taylor—Some high class water colors by Verner, G.Harlow White and Fraser and an oil painting by Jacobi.

3)Hon. Peter McLaren—A large number of water colors by *Jacobi and Bell-Smith among them being views of the high falls of the Mississippi River, Frontenac County, by Jacobi; oil painting by Jacobi (upper Mississppi and the Clyde River in this vicinity); and a large and costly oil painting by Goutois; also two will executed pictures by Dr. T.W. Beeman of this town one of them being a sunset scene on the Rideau.

4)R.J. Drummond contributed a number of collections of water color paintings, chiefly his own and mostly views of this locality which were much admired.  The high falls, Mississippi, Tay River scene near Thompson Bridge and Ottay Lake all received lasting notice from his brush.  He also showed water colors by Jacobi and Humme and a beautiful picture in oil of the Lover’s Retreat in the rear of the Parliament building in Ottawa by Miss Parris of the capital city.

5)Dr. T.W. Beeman was also a very large exhibitor all except a water color by Verner being his own productions.  Those of his that were loaned by others made the collection from his brush a large and desirable collection.  Among his best were “On the Tay Near Glen Tay”, “Wild Grasses” and some landscape scenes all of which brought out the strong artistic genius of the doctor.  Among those who loaned his pictures were Mrs. (Hon.) Peter McLaren, Mrs. (Judge) Senkler, Mrs. J.T. Henderson, Mrs. J.F. Kellock, Mrs. Boulton, Miss Shaw, Miss Drysdale, Mr. F.S. Campbell and Dr. Wilson.

6)Miss Waddell exhibited several choice oil paintings from her own brush among them being two portraits of “Young Girl”, and “Old Man” also “Fruit and Andirons”, the latter being a prize taker at an exhibition of paintings.  These were all worthy of Miss Waddell’s acknowledged merits as an artist.

 

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Robert Pilot–Perth Ontario

St. John’s, Newfoundland, 1898-1967, Québec

7)E.G. Malloch showed three paintings:  “The Cavaliers Return”, “St John the Baptist—An Allegory” and “Rocks in Autumn”.  The first two were Italian pictures and very old.

8)Col Matheson had two fine oil paintings.

9)Mrs. James Burgess had a collection of pictures in oil.

10)Mrs. A.C. Beach had a number of the same, the work of *McGillivray Knowles, one of which was “A Study on the Tay”.

 

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The riverside walk–*McGillivray Knowles

 

11)Mrs. W. Moore and Mrs. (Gemmell) Allan showed several oil paintings.

12)Miss Nellie Munro showed a collection of her own pencil and palette crayon and oil paintings creditable for an amateur.

13)Miss Mary Walker, Miss Riddell, Miss Christina Holliday and Miss M.J. Wilson had oil paintings done by themselves.

14)Miss Thompson and Miss Annie McCann also exhibited paintings in their own handiwork.

15)A portrait of F.A. Hall by Sawyer in 1881 contrasted strongly by the march of years with a photograph of himself taken lately by his daughter Mary.

16)Portraits by Field, a Perth artist of merit in the lang syne of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Douglas, the late Mr. and Mrs. A. Kippen and larger one of Sheriff Thompson painted 35 years ago brought back old remembrances.

 

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Woodland Waterfall – 1916 Tom Thompson

 

17)Two costly oil paintings by Thompson and Elson, eminent Canadian artists of cattle and landscape loaned by Robert Meighen of Montreal were the cynosure of all eyes.

18)Mrs. J.T. Henderson showed a fine large oil painting of Milton dictating his poems to his daughter.

19)The renowned artist G. Broenuch sent up a very large collection of water colors which were the finest feature of the gallery.  They were of various shades of merit and the more costly ones were gems which made one sigh for a long pocket book.  One representing scenes of the northern Norwegian coast “Midnight on the Coast of Fumarken—Effect of the Midnight Sun” showing the vivid red of the sun on a picturesque headland was greatly admired.

20)Miss Ella Fraser of Kingston sent many oil paintings for sale which we hope found customers.

21)Miss Poole showed quite a number of pencil drawings and water colors and a life size portrait of Mr. W. H. Grant, governor of the gaol painted by one of the prisoners whose genius could not keep him from behind prison bars, which painting attracted much attention.

22)Robert Jamieson showed crayon drawings.

23)G.E. Armstrong, Miss McKinley and Miss McLenaghan (Toronto), portraits and figures in pencil work.

24)Mr. Kelsey made a show in his own photographs and enlarged photographs by the A.U.W.(?) of their master workmen for some years back, which stood against the wall.

 

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Hon. John Haggart

25)Mr. T. H. Marks (Tom the Comedian) sent beautiful photographs of a laughing baby Marks and a colored life size photograph of Hon. John Haggart, which was an excellent portrait of the member for South Lanark.

26)A number of large and striking steel engravings added greatly to the exhibit and a large number of drawings from the books of the pupils of the Perth public school which showed care and skill were attractions as well.

27)Miss Lever exhibited some exceedingly well done samples of decorative work; some of them original.

28)Miss Laura James showed excellent exhibits of pen scroll work and ink drawings.

 

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29)Cartoons from Hunter of the World, Racey and Wilson(?)Wilner(?) and the inimitable Benogough of the Globe came all the way from the cities.

30)J.P. McDonald (once of Bathurst), proprietor of the Spencerian Business College of Montreal had several frames full of the most exquisite pen scrollings, pictures and penmanship.

31)On the stage were a number of cases containing china hand painting and carving.  A box, knives, etc., from the cunning hand of our stalwart friend John Brown, carved during his residence at Christie’s Lake, showed great skill for an amateur.

32)Mary Campbell of Drummond had a display of wood carvings of various types, of knives, etc., in oak, cherry, and mahogany which were truly admirable in execution.

33)Mrs. (Hon) Peter McLaren showed a unique specimen of Chinese carving.

34)Mrs. (Gemmell) Allan showed carvings in ivory and wood.

35)Mrs. R.J. Drummond showed small statuary.

36)Miss Hart and her pupils had a collection of hand painted china.

37)Miss Mary Hall, Miss Isobel Hart, Miss C.M. Drummond, Mrs. T.A. Code and Miss Maggie Armour also showed specimens of this delicate and beautiful work.

 

 

historicalnotes

JACOBI, OTTO REINHOLD, Click here

McGillivray Knowles-Click here

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting

The Female Artist from Carleton Place That Never Went Viral

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

Somewhere in Ashton-The Ashton Curmudgeon

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Photo Linda Seccaspina 2013

 

I took this photo a few years ago and thought it was lost with 100s of other local photos of the area. Then- I clicked on one of my photos on Pinterest and it had about 30 others and this was one of them. So I asked on The Tales of Carleton Place if anyone knew about this cat.

Jim Amy Kirkpatrick came forth with some great information which I thank him for.

“The cat was made by the late Henry Darvell a.k.a. ‘The Ashton Curmudgeon’. Henry was also the creator or the gourd head creations some 10 years ago. The resident of the house had several cats.

He wanted to label the sculpture ‘the cat house’ but was persuaded that it would not be appropriate. We lived across the street for 15 years and had many encounters with Henry. The cat is located on the north side of Flewellyn Road just across from the Anglican Church and rectory”.

Henry was a father, husband, grandfather, friend, neighbour, gardener, outdoors man, engineer, self-declared curmudgeon. Born March 26, 1931, in Glasgow, Scotland. Died July 27, 2007, in Carleton Place, Ontario, of heart failure, aged 76.

So anyone that has a name like the The Ashton Curmudgeon’  there has to have a story right? Well Henry Darvell does, and after digging I found a story from The Globe and Mail that was written by SHAYNA WATSON, ROB JENNINGS AND GILES DARVELL in January of 2007

Globe and Mail story by SHAYNA WATSON, ROB JENNINGS AND GILES DARVELL

(Shayna Watson and Rob Jennings are Henry’s friends, and Giles Darvell is his eldest son)

It is fitting that Henry, born in Scotland and raised in England, would find himself in a Canadian hamlet of 100 people most famous for its pub. He claimed status as the Ashton Village Curmudgeon with a self-published book by that name. The book was atlas, architectural document and love song to the village and life he adored.

He left Ashton, near Ottawa, adorned with sculptures made of gourds, daffodils, trees, garden gates with sunflower designs and unlikely connections between people.

Henry cultivated relationships. He was married twice, first for 26 years to Betty, with whom he had three children – Giles, Karen and Tim (Henry Darvell was married to his first wife, Betty, for 30 years) and then for 20 years to Susan, who predeceased him in 2003.

Susan and Henry found great joy in their large garden. Henry designed and built additions to his barn and home. He traded lumber for copper and began building fountains; this gave way to gourd sculptures and then to painting and life drawing.

Henry accommodated, though didn’t give in to, his failing health. He had cardiomyopathy.

Henry enjoyed drinks at the Ashton Pub on darts night, ice cream at the General Store, a good meal and the perfume of a beautiful flower.

Behind his big gruff exterior was a gentle man who easily fell under the spell of small children, delicate garden creatures and the promise of seeds.

He spoke with great pride of his children and grandchildren. His friends were a group of people as eclectic as his interests. The extent of his social circle was evident at his 70th birthday party – toddlers, retired farmers, academics and artists joined the celebration.

Although he was unable to walk more than a block or two, Henry headed for Mexico with his dog and camper van. This was preceded by trips to northwestern Ontario, Yukon and James Bay, and followed by a trip to Newfoundland.

In the later stages of his illness, he complained that he was “dying too bloody slowly,” but Henry lived independently until a few days before his death, in his home surrounded by Dougal, his canine companion, sports on the telly and a book by his side.

When he died, he left an ambitious five-foot canvas with the beginnings of a farm scene, gourds partly carved, fish to feed, plants to tend and frogs to show to visiting children. These were the signs of hope and the love of life that desired one more day.

Author’s Note- That day when I stopped to take the picture of the cat I knew someone special had done this. Over the years I kept looking at the photo and wondering and now it has come 360. You were a special man Henry Darvell and I wish I had known you. Sometimes it’s just hard to be a square peg in a round hole, but I think every person has their own identity and beauty. If we were all the same, it would be boring.

historicalnotes

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Photo-Goulburn Historical Society

“Looking through the Reference Boxes of Goulbourn material now located in the Local History section of the Stittsville Library, I came across this treasure. It’s a beautiful little booklet entitled “The Ashton Village Curmudgeon.” It was written and illustrated by Henry Darvell and it has beautifully detailed coloured drawings of Ashton buildings and tells a simple and personal story of Ashton. You can go and see it for yourself. It’s not a circulating book but it’s worth a look just to admire Henry’s beautiful drawings” Goulburn Township Historical Society 2012

Goulbourn Township Historical Society Facebook page- click here..

NEWSLETTER: The GTHS newsletter, The Goulbourn News, is published quarterly and sent to all members free of charge. You can help the GTHS keep costs down by having your copy be sent to you via e-mail. METHODS OF PAYMENT: Cash, or Cheque made payable to the “Goulbourn Township Historical Society”. Please mail to: Goulbourn Township Historical Society PO Box 621, 2060 Huntley Road Stittsville, ON, Canada K2S 1A7

DARVELL, Henry S. Peacefully at the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital on July 27, 2007 at the age of 76 years. Beloved husband of the late Susan Darvell. Loving father of Giles and wife Laura of Ottawa, Karen of Moose Creek, and Tim of Delta B.C. Fondly remembered by grandsons Brian Darvell (Tanya) and Alex Darvell. Also remembered by his first wife, mother of Giles, Karen & Tim – Betty Darvell. After serving in the British Merchant Navy, Henry became a Professional Civil Engineer in England. His career then brought him to Canada where he worked on both private and public sector projects in Montreal, Winnipeg and Ottawa.

His lifelong passion for gardening turned into a second profession, working as a Horticulturalist until retirement. The family wish to extend their genuine appreciation to Dr. Walker and the nursing staff of the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital. They are also thankful to dear friend Brian Jarman for his care and support over the past number of months.

 Private cremation will take place at Pinecrest Crematorium. Reflecting Henry’s passion for plants and flowers, the family welcomes floral tributes, or donations may be made to the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital.

Related reading

The Ashton Funeral to end all Funerals

Did Anyone Ever Have Fun in Ashton? Ashton 101

Did Anyone Have Fun in Ashton? Part 2- The Fleming House