Tag Archives: arnprior

The Lumsden Family at the Ottawa Exhibition 1899

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The Lumsden Family at the Ottawa Exhibition 1899

photo from Larry Clark Lumbsden Family 1899
The photo was taken at the Ottawa Ex.– I believe it may be a photo of John Lumsden’s family (Beth’s great grandparents) in the carriage with some of the children looking on. John was a horse dealer from Arnprior and it was noted that he had attended the Ex since its inception. circa late 1890s * see history below-The Family That Visited the Fair every year.
same family –Mr. and Mrs Lumsden 1951

A lot of professional and amateur photographers liked to show their work and take portraits at the annual local fairs. In the 1900s the amateur photography exhibits became larger and more non-local people entered them, sometimes winning the majority of prizes. The portrait picture above taken at the Ottawa Exhibition is of the Lumsden family from Arnprior and was sent to me by Larry Clark. The family in some variation or another attended the Ottawa fair each year until John’s death in 1952.

Sitting for a photo, especially at the Ottawa Exhibition must have been a nuisance. Good luck getting the kids to sit still for a family photo let alone convincing mum and dad to stare into space for 15 minutes. So, the rules were: No talking, no sneezing and just to be safe, no smiling. For most people, having photographs taken was not a common activity, as they might only have their pictures taken a few times in their lives. The etiquette and beauty standards of the time also called for a small, tightly controlled mouth and they believed smiles were only worn by peasants, children and drunks.

The Central Canada Exhibition Association was formed in 1888 and began holding an agriculture exhibition at Lansdowne Park. (named that in 1890) When it opened that year you only had two ways to get there, other than by walking– taking a horse-drawn bus or a jolly paddle up the Rideau Canal. Before that travelling shows and events like The Great Dominion Exhibition would hold exhibitions there– but this was the first one that Ottawa convened. Of course there were the complainers that stated that the exhibition was too far from the city, which in the later years of the EX, well, there were complaints it was too close.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Sep 1899, Wed  •  Page 3

So what would have the Lumsden family experienced in 1899 at the Ottawa Exhibition?

September 20, 1899 The Ottawa Exhibition

Despite the untimely downpour of rain that came on just before the evening performance started the exhibition that day was well attended. There was over 5,837 people taking seats in the stand and the total attendance for the day and evening was 15,294–the largest yet. The grandstand performance was witnessed by 2,061 people. The same day last year the attendance, with ideal weather, attendance was over 14,000. The directors are not losing heart, however, and knowing that they have a fair that warrants Queen’s weather, they are resting their hopes on the early reappearance of Old Sol. (the sun)

Ottawa late-19th Century

The special attractions in the afternoon were carried out with the snap and success that have characterized them so far. In all there are sixteen specialties, any of which would prove a show in itself The log-rolling contests proved Intensely Interesting. For ten minutes Leekie and O’Donnell kept their balance on the rapidly revolving log that seemed like a thing of life.

Finally Leekie who has proved himself before the ablest of the four contestants, dislodged O’Donnell amid great cheers. Roach and Fournier then tried conclusions. Roach proving himself the master in this trial. In the trials Leekle succeeded in dismounting Roach, thus making firmer his hold on first money.

In the sword contests, another intensely interesting feature of the program. Staff Sgt. Morgans and Randolph, the Rough Rider champion, crossed weapons, the bouts ending in favour of Morgan. Randolph, it may be said is hampered by the rules, to which he is a stranger.

The balloon ascension added another to Miss Leroy’s list of successes. The ascent was made about 4.30 and the balloon attained an altitude of 3,000 feet when the artist cast free her parachute. She landed about a mile from the grounds near Rideauvllle, and escaped unhurt. The musical ride by the Royal Canadian Dragoons although given in the rain was very effective and prettily executed. All the mid air artists performed and Mr. Arthur P. Buckner gave his exhibition of trick bicycle riding. All these features were loudly, applauded, and the artists voted amongst the cleverest that have yet performed before an Ottawa audience.

Lumsden Family photos- Pearl is Beth’s grandmother. Larry Clark

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Sep 1899, Mon  •  Page 2

The Family That Visited the Fair every year.

August 25th 1951

Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Sep 1888, Mon  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Sep 1913, Mon  •  Page 1

Read-Nellie Thurston –Balloonist Maiden Voyage in McFarlane Grove

Gillies Mill Sand Point Braeside…. Fires etc.

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Gillies Mill Sand Point Braeside…. Fires etc.
Gillies Mill no date
the day after the fire 1949-The Gillies Fire Braeside July 4th 1949

John built his first sawmill on the Clyde River, 3 miles north of the village of Lanark, Ontario. In the early 1870’s, John sold the Gillies Mills at Carleton Place to John Herron and bought the sawmill at Braeside from the Hon. Asa Foster (who had previously purchased it from Rev. Henry Usborne).

In 1867, James came to Carleton Place as manager for John Gillies (his father) and Peter McLaren (later Senator McLaren) where he oversaw the operations of the sawmill. James also maintained his partnership with his brothers (William, David, and John Jr.) who had moved to Braeside.

John Gillies (1811-1888) came to Canada in 1821. In the 1840’s, he built a water-driven sawmill five miles north of the village of Lanark, at a place then called Gillies Mills (now known as Herron’s Mills). In 1862, he purchased the Gilmour limits on the Mississippi River and a sawmill at Carleton Place for his sons; he enlarged this sawmill to a capacity of 20 million feet. (This sawmill was later purchased by the McLaren and Edward’s interests and operated under the name of the Canada Lumber Co.). In 1872 or 1873, Gillies bought the Braeside sawmill (which came to be known as the Gillies Bros., Ltd.) from the Reverend Henry Usborne (an absentee English proprietor who built the mill in 1869 on the completion of the Canada Central Railway to Sand Point, 2 miles west of Braeside) and also purchased 200 square miles of timber limits on the Coulonge River in Quebec.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Aug 1910, Thu  •  Page 6

On July 4, 1910, a fire destroyed the west lumber yard containing 29 million board feet of lumber at Braeside; the sawmill was not damaged. But, in 1919, there was another fire and the sawmill was destroyed. However, by 1920-1921, a new electrically driven brick and concrete mill was erected. At that time, it was the firstfireproof mill of its kind in Canada.

There was also a fire in 1949- see The Gillies Fire Braeside July 4th 1949

Braeside Archives

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
31 May 1915, Mon  •  Page 9
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relatedreading

Arnprior The Saw Mill Town 1900

The Gillies Fire Braeside July 4th 1949

David Armitage Gillies –Last of the Old “Camboose” Lumber Men

The McLaren Fire — 3,000,000 Feet of Lumber Destroyed

The Day Carleton Place was Nearly Wiped Out!

The Day Carleton Place was Nearly Wiped Out!

The Lost Gillies Family Ephemera Rescued

The Gillies Home in the Ghost Town of Herron’s Mills

Photos: Sand Point flood

Channeling John Gillies

Tales from the Mines —Kingdon Mine Part 2

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Tales from the Mines —Kingdon Mine Part 2

SHARON ROBB,

I would love to see an article on this village where my grandparents lived in the 30’s. It is near Fitzroy Harbour. My grandfather Walter Bootland was a mine superintendent or supervisor for the mill there. He left there to work in the gold fields in Noranda but died of leukaemia shortly after, likely a result of lead exposure at Kingdon. Thank you!

Regards Sharon Malone

Here was the first one I wrote.. Kingdon Mine Led Galetta Area from a Boomtown to a Ghost Town now part 2

Old Barn, Kingdom Mines, Ont. – Cube Projects
Old Barn, Kingdom Mines, Ont.$1,500.00 CAD*· In stock·Brand: Cube Projects
R. W. Burton 1971 oil on panel 10 X 13 in. Provenance: Directly from the artist’s studio, owned by Monette family of Ottawa. Ralph Wallace Burton
Map of Kingdon Mine Rd, Ottawa, ON

Less than 40 miles from Canada’s capital city there are 2,000 acres of undeveloped bushlands with some four miles- of waterfront. In that triangle of land bounded by the Ottawa, and Mississippi Rivers, and what is commonly known as the Mississippi Snye. I had no idea what that meant so looked it up. The Snye originates as a branch of the Mississippi River, which enters the Ottawa River at Marshall Bay, upstream of Morris Island

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jul 1922, Wed  •  Page 4

During the years of 1914 to 1930, Kingdon Mining and Smelting Company was among the greatest producers of lead in Canada. In those years the village of Kingdon Mine boasted some 40 homes, a school, community hall, arena, and produced some of the finest baseball and hockey teams in the district.

Tom Lauzon’s General Store was the focal point for evening gatherings when the sports program was not in full swing. It was a “boom” town and remained so until 1931 when the bottom fell out. The inhabitants moved out; some to the northern mining camps; some to the village of Galetta; and others to the industrial town of Arnprior eight miles away.

Within a few years, the place was a ghost town; the old unpainted fronts of the frame buildings that once dotted the main street began to come down; hydro lines were withdrawn; there was no water system left; and the few oldtimers who remained had to revert to the oil lamp and the old village well.

JOHN J. STANTON, retired Fitzroy Harbor farmer and noted historian, tells that his father who homesteaded lots 23 and, 24 on the 7th concession of Fitzroy, stumbled across the lead discovery prior to 1870. A haying bee was. taking place on the Stanton farm and the crew started a fire on a big rock to boil a pot of tea, and they noticed the moulten lead” seeping from the rock.

While the discovery of lead on Laflamme Island, now known as Chats Island, was made prior to 1870, the first work was begun by James Robertson in July, 1884. Some few hundred tons of “hand cobbed” ore (lead or galena cobbed from the calcite matrix) was shipped to Kingston for smelting.

A fire then destroyed, the buildings and equipment and nothing was done until 1914 – when the James Robertson Estate reopened the mine; the shaft was sunk, and under the direction of general manager A. G. Munich, a mill was built and a smelter- erected. By 1931 the main shaft had gone to a depth of 1,448 feet when the price of lead literally evaporated and the mine shut down.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1937, Tue  •  Page 19

From 1915 to 1931 some 905,000 tons of ore and waste was hoisted. Lead concentrates produced 76,-820,000 pounds along with 657,000 pounds of zinc concentrates. Pig lead amounted to almost 60 million pounds valued at more than $4,334,-000. In October, 1937 the Fort Rouiile Mining Corporation attempted a reclaim operation on the mine, but relinquished its option in 1938 when the price of lead again dropped.

Capital gems

Today, all that’s left is a great white calcite tailing pile looking much like a snowy desert with the ghostlike ends of sluice structures sticking from the huge piles. This fine glistening stone is in great demand for driveways, service station lots and decorative concrete work, but was found later to contain lead. Engineering reports say the Kingdon Mine was never exhausted of ore, but merely shut down due to the abnormally low prices of lead.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1968, Sat  •  Page 34
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Sep 1923, Thu  •  Page 6

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Aug 1925, Fri  •  Page 3

Related reading

Kingdon Mine Led Galetta Area from a Boomtown to a Ghost Town

Galetta area’s hard-rock past comes to life

William Bootland

Kingdon Mine - CapitalGems.ca
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Mar 1942, Wed  •  Page 19

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Nov 1946, Fri  •  Page 31
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Dec 1946, Tue  •  Page 8

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 May 1936, Sat  •  Page 24
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Dec 1974, Tue  •  Page 40
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Sep 1953, Fri  •  Page 42

Falling out of Windows — There’s Always a Story

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Falling out of Windows — There’s Always a Story

‘The Campbell House, Arnprior, Ont. G. Lodge, Prop.’

Date: 
1900
Location: 
John Street, Arnprior, Ontario, Canada-Arnprior and District Museum
Arnprior, Ontario

l I was doing some research today and found quite the interesting clipping. Seems a Mrs. Campbell of Arnprior while closing the shutters on the second floor on September of 1906 leaned out too far and took a nosedive to the ground. There were no hydrangea bushes to stop her fall and she passed away with a fractured skull 12 hours later.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Feb 1906, Thu  •  Page 9

She was the wife of the proprietor Dr. W. A. Campbell of the Campbell House in Arnprior. Everything has a story no matter what it is so I decided to dig deeper. Her husband probably torn by grief retired a year later having Mr. Lodge take over the Arnprior Hotel, who previously ran the Commercial Hotel in Pakenham.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1907, Sat  •  Page 11

The Campbell House Hotel was one of the main hotels in Arnprior until it burned down in September of 1923. It was situated on the north side of the intersection of John and Elgin streets, right in the heart of the business section of Arnprior. Campbell Hotel was an old frame building and was owned by the estate of the late Dr. W. A. Cameron, of Arnprior, but Mr. Joseph Campbell, son of the late A. Campbell, managed the place.

On Sept. 30, 1923 Ivan Leblanc, single, and 33 years of age, of Richibucto, N.B., a lumberman, was burned to death in the biggest fire Arnprior had ever experienced in years. The Campbell House was completely destroyed and the losses were estimated at $150.000, only partly covered by insurance.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Jun 1918, Sat  •  Page 4

Leblanc had come to Arnprior and rented a room in the hotel. During the fire it was thought everyone was out but Leblanc’s friend, Romeo Papineau, missed him and a search was made in the ruins of the hotel. The result was that a charred body was found. Apparently, the unfortunate man was in bed and never woke up.

The fire was discovered about 1.15 a.m. in the barber shop of Mr. A. Carswell, in the ground floor of the building. The cause was unknown, but in the barber shop there was an appliance for heating water and the opinion was expressed that this may have caused the fire. When discovered the fire had a strong hold and although the Arnprior fire department made a prompt response the fire was beyond control. A hurried call had been sent through the hotel by Mr. Joseph Campbell, manager of the hotel, and the guests and occupants of other portions of the building were able to get out, although it was a close shave for many.

Shortly after the commencement of the blaze, the explosion of a quantity of dynamite that had been stored in a shed at the back caused considerable excitement attracting a big crowd and the flames were visible twelve miles away.

Some left the hotel with only a few clothes on and they were given shelter by citizens of the town. A brisk north wind served to fan the flames into a furious pace; but the same wind proved to be a blessing in disguise as it also served to beep the flames off the rest of the town. At its height the fire made a spectacle of awe and practically everybody in Arnprior was awake and watching the blaze.

If the wind had veered around, the flames would undoubtedly have wiped out the largest part of the town. The Arnprior fire department although pitifully handicapped against such a fire, did excellent work in protecting surrounding buildings. The “Chronicle” office next door was saved by a brick wall and the Harvey block, on the east side, was slightly damaged by water but was saved, mainly owing to the efforts of the firemen and the many citizens of the town who volunteered for service.

The building became a total loss, the fire having burned until a late hour the next day. The hotel contained on the ground floor a number of shops and other establishments, all of which lost practically everything. A Chinese laundry of which, Laung Lee was the proprietor, was valued at $1,100, with no insurance. Mr. A. Carswell, in whose barber shop the fire started lost everything in his barber shop, but could place no estimate on his loss. He had no insurance.

Mr. W. W. Handrord. photographer, lost everything in his photo shop. He could not estimate his losses. Mr. Pierre Clouthier, lost everything in restaurant and his apartments above the place was a total loss. He placed his loss at $1,000 with no insurance. T. P. O’Toole, druggist, was completely burned out for a total loss. His loss was partly covered by insurance, but Mr. O’Toole could place no estimate on his loss.

Another barber in the building, M. J. Lindy lost $400 and was covered by insurance. Another total loss was suffered by Adam Andrews, plumber and tinsmith. The heat of the fire was terrific and plate glass in practically all the buildings around the fire was destroyed. The plate glass loss was estimated at about $7,000, covered by insurance.

When dawn came not a structure of any kind stood in the area bounded by John street as far as the printing office of the Arnprior Chronicle, and by Elgin street to the Dominion Cafe. The rear of which was badly damaged and a large quantity of poultry and a cow were burned. Leblanc and a friend, Papineau, were employees of McLachlin Brothers, Ltd. They had come down yesterday morning from the Kipawa limit to draw their pay, and had intended returning the net day. The two men had obtained a room over Clouthier’s restaurant, which was in the lower part of a two-storey extension of the main four-storey hotel. Leblanc was fast asleep while his roommate and friend Papineau was dining downstairs at the restaurant.

This was the second disastrous fire within a few years on the Campbell block. Campbell House had suffered a similar fate a few years previous and Mr. A. J. Campbell had built an extension adding a few stores becoming a prominent place in town. Now it was just a mass of ruin and left a bare space in town.

 

Date
1922
Format
photographic
Collection/Fonds
W.G. Davies fonds
Description Level
Item
Reference No.
P-94-208
Reproduction Location
Binder 4A P0345a.
Scope and Content
Photograph of burned out Campbell House taken from John Street looking towards Elgin after a fire. See also, Photocopy number 344.
Notes
Campbell House burned January 15 1922
Accession No.
1993-0017

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The Windsor Star
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
01 Oct 1923, Mon  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Feb 1948, Wed  •  Page 14-Former Hotelman G. Lodge Passes
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
14 Dec 1907, Sat  •  Page 11

McCann’s Hotel Fire in Perth

Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

relatedreading

The House at Sand Point

Photos: Sand Point flood

The Jinxed House of Crown Point

Arnprior The Saw Mill Town 1900

Interesting People –R. E. Irvine — The Story of a Bottle

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Interesting People –R. E. Irvine — The Story of a Bottle

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Photo-Adin Wesley Daigle

Our community Carleton Place archaeologist Adin Wesley Daigle posted this photo on Facebook and said it was his favourite bottle.  Not being a bottle collector I still had to agree and decided to investigate one R. E. Irvine from Ottawa. The bottle was great so I figured it must have a story!

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The only thing I could find out was that R. E Irvine was served a lawsuit in 1910 from the Sanitaris Co. in Ottawa. Well I knew who Sanitarius was as I had written about their affiliation to Diamond Park Mineral Water. Irvine bottled beer and other beverages like Lithia water. Lithia water is defined as a type of mineral water characterized by the presence of  lithium salts which he got from the Diamond Park and sold by Sanitarius. Natural lithia mineral spring waters are rare and between the 1880s and World War I, the consumption of bottled lithia mineral water was popular as well as the Mineral Water spas outside Pakenham. ( Diamond Springs and Dominion Springs).

Mr. Irvine also owned the local Ottawa Livery and Boarding Stable in Ottawa– but that is another story. Actually, it could be a series of stories from the vast amount of postings in the Ottawa newspapers.

As well as the waters business, R.E. Irvine purchased a high-end livery and riding stable in 1906. From the Citizen, April 26, 1906: Photo Jaan Kolk and information.

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Feb 1910, Thu  •  Page 11

Diamond Park Mineral Water was world famous in its day, and it was located near Arnprior.  Among the components in the water were salt and sulphur and the water was said to have curative powers dealing with rheumatic problems, hangover headaches and an aid in flushing the kidneys. Diamond Park Springs was located on the edge of Pakenham Township in the late 1800s, but was flooded by Ontario Hydro when the dam was put in place at the head pond. At one point there was a 12-room hotel on site and proved to be a popular spa in its day. The plant was later sold to Sanitaris Ltd. who continued bottling water from their plant at the corner of John and William streets behind the current LCBO in Arnprior.

mineral

Sanitaris Natural Mineral Water Building, Arnprior, Canada–Date: 1914 Location:
John Street, Arnprior, Ontario, Canada

By 1910 R. E. Irvine looks like he was no longer running his namesake company and was letting someone else run it. (Morel Bros. Aerated Waters?)  Sanitaris was taking him to court for the disappearance of “empties” as we kids used to say.  Irvine said that they had been returned — Sanitarius said he or his successor had not. Needless to say Mr. Irvine’s company was on the hook for a grand sum of $480 unless all was returned.

Jaan Kolk said: “Irvine was a businessman, who came likely came to Ottawa for a business opportunity and left for a better one”. (I don’t think the minor legal disputes were of any importance.)

Jaan Kolk our favourite historian  found this: Robert Irvine, mineral waters 359 Wellington, boarding at Butler House, is listed in the 1901 Ottawa City Directory, The business seems to have peaked around 1909, when it was at 200 Bay Street. Still there as Irvine in 1911, it was shown as Morel Bros. Aerated Waters in 1912. Here is an Ottawa Journal ad from May 18, 1909. (above)

After researching — no mention of the case was made in the media again except for this one above Jaan Kolk  found from 1900. This Ottawa Citizen note from Aug. 25, 1900 on a suit over Irvine’s use of the name “Hygeia Water” mentions he was formerly in Toronto.   So what was Hugeia Water? J.J. McLaughlin started out professional life as a druggist and eventually focused on what started out as a typical pharmacy sideline, making soda water, which he initially called Hygeia Waters, the Hygeia, being a play on the word hygiene. McLaughlin’s Hygeia Waters were based on a Belfast dry ginger ale recipe. The name was rebranded as the much more successful Canada Dry.

Meanwhile, the case from Sanitarius stated that “judgement was reserved”. Most often, the judge will reserve judgment which means that the judge will take some time – days, weeks, or even months – to consider the matter before issuing the judgment and  it is usually written though it may be delivered orally. In this case Irvine had left from the Ottawa area, but if you looked hard enough you would see what happened. By 1910 the ads for the Irvine Company had stopped in the Ottawa Journal and The Ottawa Citizen and Irvine was now– wait for this– in Vancouver.

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May 1909- Ottawa Citizen

In May of 1909 it looks like R. E. was preparing for a future elsewhere. First there was a massive auction sale at his home on Slater and Bay. In June of the same year he transferred some land from R. E. Irvine to R. Irvine Ltd. In 1910 R. E. Irvine had bought and was running Cross & Co.  in Vancouver. The business had been under various ownerships. Originally founded by Mr. Cross D. Gavinit, as Vancouver Soda Water Works in 1896. Then purchased by the late J. J. Banfield, who remained owner until he sold his interests to the late R. E. Irvine. R.E.’s son E. L. Irvine bought the business from him in 1917. 

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Early Circa. 1915-30s British Columbia Soda Siphon / Syphon Seltzer Bottles – Cross and Company Vancouver BC

In an ironic twist like every trade or profession, Irvine’s venture into the Cross & Co soda water business had its troubles just like Sanitarius did with the R. E. Irvine Company in Ottawa. One of the chief problems was maintaining the bottle supply. Bottles cost the company 7 cents each, and since a deposit of only 5 cents a bottle is charged, a loss of 2 cents was sustained on very bottle not returned.

“When the public consider these figures it will realize the benefit, both to the consumer and to ourselves, of returning all empty bottles,” Mr. Irvine said. “For every bottle returned the customer reduces the cost of his thirst-quenchers by five cents. For every bottle not returned we lost two cents.” The loss on bottles was so heavy that Cross & Co. had to purchase $3000 worth annually to maintain its supply. Is this what happened to the R. E. Irvine Co in Ottawa or, was it just for a better opportunity as Jaan Kolk said?

One thing is for sure Mr. R. E. Irvine never set foot back in Ottawa until 1918 and the couple was described in the news as having been residents of Ottawa until 1910 and of course Sanitarius never got their money for the empties.

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The Vancouver Sun
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
20 Oct 1928, Sat  •  Page 11

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Cross and Company Vancouver BC Then and Now.

Sanitaris

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jan 1898, Thu  •  Page 1

relatedreading

A. Huckels & Co. -The Story of a Bottle- Thanks to Jaan Kolk

Where Were the Miracle Salt Springs in Pakenham? I Love a Challenge!

Social Note Shenanigans from the Almonte Gazette June 1899

Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

The Marvellous Jaan Kolk

Talking Through Your Hat? Jaan Kolk

So Where Was Caldwell Mills? Thanks Jaan Kolk

The Thrift Store Couple – More Information-Jaan Kolk

The House on the Hill — Up the 8th Line of Ramsay — Jaan Kolk Files

Britannia Boat House Doomed— April 1907 Ice Jam –Jaan Kolk Files

The 64 Million Dollar Question About the Hill General Store

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The 64 Million Dollar Question About the Hill General Store

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Photo McRae Family

 

It seems that we have been all up and down the Valley with this one. But, yesterday Penny Trafford emailed me. She is highly knowledgeable with local history and here is what she said. I think a trip to Galetta is in store..:)

 

Hi Linda, about the store everyone thought was in Braeside, the store did look very familiar to me from my childhood. I could recall being in the car with my Dad and driving past it. My cousin answered the mystery tonight of it’s location. This store was in Galetta. My Dad grew up in Galetta. The next info is from my cousin Phyllis Proulx. In Galetta there was Kenny Smith across from him was the Wallace’s the store was across from Wallace’s after you cross the tracks from Arnprior on the left before you turn to go to Mohrs Corners-where they used to go to school.

Thank you Penny!

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Photo McRae Family

 - as of SOME FACTS ABOUT VILLAGE OF GALETTA Went...

 

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 12 Jun 1926, Sat,
  3. Page 28

 

 - other wire and received another Jolt. In...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 16 May 1910, Mon,
  3. Page 5

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and theSherbrooke Record and and Screamin’ Mamas (USA

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place. Tales of Almonte and Arnprior Then and Now

 

relatedreading

Found the Location of the W.R. Hill General Store?

Looking for Information on W. R. Hill General Store

The Gillies Fire Braeside July 4th 1949

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The Gillies Fire Braeside  July 4th 1949
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  4. August 1949
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  6.  - Main Stocks Are Bv Direction Of Saved Wind By...

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A few days after the fire in Gillies Bros. lumber yard. 17 Aug. 1949

 

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The day after the fire

 

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  1. a059349-v8 (2).jpgJohn Gillies Sr. home at Gillies Mills, now Herron’s Mills.
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  6. historicalnotes

     - Late J. A. Gillies Was Prominent Lumberman John...

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Citizen,
    2. 29 Mar 1937, Mon,
    3. Page 2

 

 

relatedreading

 

Help Thy Neighbour in Carleton Place- Ronnie Waugh Fire 1959

David Armitage Gillies –Last of the Old “Camboose” Lumber Men

Smiths Falls Fire-Coghlan & Moag

The Fires of 1897

Kingdon Mine Led Galetta Area from a Boomtown to a Ghost Town

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Kingdon Mine Led Galetta Area from a Boomtown to a Ghost Town

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Kingdon Mines (Lead) at Fitzroy [Harbour, Ont.] near Arnprior. ca. 1910

Up river from Fitzroy Harbor and near Galetta, a lead mine, known as Kingdon Mines, produced high quality lead for some time, but was flooded when Chat. Falls dam was built. The entrance tunnels and pits are all flooded by the swamp nearby.

To see what is left of Kingdon Mines head on down to the video below.

 

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 - Kingdon mine led Galetta area from boom town to...

 

 - Lead warnings no shock to town West Carleton... - Lead: Will take test to be on safe side...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 18 Jan 2000, Tue,
  3. Page 36

 

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 21 Nov 1919, Fri,
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 - INVESTIGATE DEATH . LATE MS. HHT (Special to...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 24 Feb 1908, Mon,
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 - 5 What's New in Mining j The vicinity of...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 03 Oct 1925, Sat,
  3. Page 10

 

 - as of SOME FACTS ABOUT VILLAGE OF GALETTA Went...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 12 Jun 1926, Sat,
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 - 13 , rtBE VICTIM INTEMsED. , PAKJENHAM, Ont,...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 15 Apr 1931, Wed,
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 - on-n eareleasueaa possibly due to hi altered...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 09 Oct 1919, Thu,
  3. Page 20

 - Miner Killed by Cave-In. Arnprlor,- Ont., Aug....

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  1. Nanaimo Daily News,
  2. 12 Aug 1925, Wed,
  3. Page 4

 - a R. Sawyer Passes At 77 Richard Thomas Sawyer,...

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  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 28 May 1951, Mon,
  3. Page 14

 

 - consider-(Continued Rail- be a to for Mother...

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  1. Nanaimo Daily News,
  2. 11 Mar 1935, Mon,
  3. Page 1

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Gold Mines and Disappearances

Is there Still Gold on Wellesley Island ?

Did Anyone Find the Lost Barrel of Silver Coins That Lies at the Bottom of the Rideau Canal?

What Happened to the Gold on the Ramsay 7th line?

Gold in Dem Dar Hills of Lanark

So What Happened to the Marble at the Tatlock Mine?

My Daddy was a Miner — was Yours?

The Mysterious Tatlock Mine

The Early Days of Working in the Ramsay Mine — Going Down Down Down

Looking for the Artist of this Carleton Place Painting-The Lime Kiln

A Giant’s Kettle in the Middle of Lanark County

Where Were the Miracle Salt Springs in Pakenham? I Love a Challenge!

Gold Mines and Disappearances

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series–Volume 16– Newman’s Hall

The Mystery of the W.G. Hill Store Continues….

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The Mystery of the W.G. Hill Store Continues….

 

Jeff Brennan sent this to add to the mystery of the McRae family’s “W. G. Hill Store”.. Some say it is and some say it isn’t and Jeff’s Grandmother is 93 and does not remember it. This page is from the archives of the Ontario Womans Institute. We continue to search…

 

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

Found the Location of the W.R. Hill General Store

Looking for Information on W. R. Hill General Store

Found the Location of the W.R. Hill General Store

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Found the Location of the W.R. Hill General Store

 

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Pearl Neill standing in front of the W.R.- Photo McRae Family

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Lila Leach James was the first to mention this, and the more I looked at it I realized  the former W.R. Hill General Store was now Braeside Furnishings. The McRae family member said it was in the Arnprior area and she was right. I cannot find a thing about W. R. Hill but you can see the original windows boarded up and the longer building was definitely renovated and cut down when you look at the parking lot.

You can see the placement of two windows and a door of the original building and a peaked roof was added to it on the longer section. Thanks Lila for all your help.

 

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Photo McRae Family

 

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Braeside Firnishings.

Thanks to all that thought it was the Hill General store in McDonald’s Corners. Definitely not– but a heck of a good guess. 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading (1).jpg

David Armitage Gillies –Last of the Old “Camboose” Lumber Men

Looking for Information on W. R. Hill General Store

The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 22- Code Family–Field Day at “The Hill” (McDonald’s Corners)

A Little Known Fact About McDonald’s Corners