Tag Archives: appleton

Appleton Map and Odds and Ends — Clippings of Appleton

Standard
Appleton Map and Odds and Ends — Clippings of Appleton

Map of the Appleton Community 1930-1940, Drawn from Memory

Date:

1930-1940

Location:

Appleton, Town of Mississippi Mills, Ontario, Canada

Credits:

North Lanark Regional Museum (Library)


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Apr 1900, Sat  •  Page 11

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Apr 1935, Sat  •  Page 2

One whose memory carries back almost to the pioner davs of this little hamlet and who retains vivid recollections of the scenes is Mrs. John Reid. presently residing’ with her daugh’er, Mr D. M Chambers, at 195 Howell avenue. Mrs. Reid. who is a daughter of the late William Young, who con- ducted a tailoring establishment In Appleton for many years, was born eighty-four years ago on a farm on the ninth concession of Ramsay, but she was very young when her parents took up their residence in Appleton. Mm. Reids mother wss Agnes Templeton. daughter of the late James Templeton, one of the pioneer settlers in Ramsay township.

The Templetons and their daughter and son-in-law emigrated to this country from England in the early 1840s. They came over in one of the old-time sailing vessels taking nine weeks to make the crossing. When they reached Montreal thev had to drive to Smiths Falls and then walk the rest of the distance over blazed trails through the forest, carrying their belongings with them.

At that time there was nothing but virgin forest where the village of Appleton stands today. When the Youngs moved into the village of Appleton In the middle 1850s, several industries had already been established there, mainly through the enterprise of the Teskey family, who were among the most prominent and influential citizens of the district at that time.

Robert Teskey ran the sawmill and Adam Teskev was in charge of the woollen factory. The only other industry at that time was a tannery, conducted by J. and P. Cram. There were two blacksmith shops, presided over by Martin Manho. Read more below…


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1935, Sat  •  Page 2

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jul 1916, Sat  •  Page 16


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Jun 1929, Tue  •  Page 7
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Sep 1917, Tue  •  Page 13


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Mar 1947, Thu  •  Page 17

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1900, Wed  •  Page 1

Unraveled and Threadbare

Fumerton Family– Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

Convictions: Moonshine in Darling, Party in Appleton and Firetrucks 1948

Mr. Allen’s Chickens– Appleton

Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton

Another Memory of the Cavers family in Appleton

Fumerton Family– Appleton

Standard
Fumerton Family– Appleton

Almonte Gazette

September 15, 1882

Death of an Old Resident – On Sunday last about 10 o’clock Mr. John Fummerton, of Appleton , in his 94th year, passed away and went to “join the majority.” The deceased, was the last but one of the first settlers, Mr. William Hamilton being now the only survivor. Mr. Fummerton was born in Paisley , in Scotland , and was considerable of a traveler in his earlier years, having visited among other countries, Greenland and the West Indies .

It is nearly 70 years since he first settled on the farm on which he died and to which in the early days of the settlement he carried flour and nails all the way from Brockville on his back. Subsequently he sawed the lumber by hand and himself built a boat with which he went to Montreal for provisions. His family consisted of eight children, who are all living but one. Up to within a few days of his death he walked daily to the village of Appleton to get his mail matter, the distance being about one mile. He took his last walk on Thursday the 31st of August, and on returning fell in the lane leading to his house, and on being found was removed thither, where he died on Sunday last.

The funeral took place on Tuesday and the length of the procession, over a mile, testified to the respect in which the deceased was held. The remains were taken first to Appleton Church and thence to Cram’s Cemetery. Comparing the present with the past, what a peaceful revolution was accomplished in the neighborhood in his lifetime.

December 1950 Almonte Gazette

The will in the heart of man to do and dare is not dead nor does life get tedious, not around Appleton anyway, ’tis said. Mr. Howard Fumerton of the 11th line of Beckwith, bought a building from Mr. Elmsley of the 11th line of Ramsay and expressed a desire to move the buiding intact. So with men arid tractors, the procession started. Old Timer ‘Bete’ was noticed standing by sadly shaking his head and murmuring “It can’t be done.”

But through fields, highways and byways the moving proceeded slowly until one afternoon something happened one of the skids and the building settled down in a creek for the night. Mr. Art Fumerton came to the rescue and eventually the building was in Mr. Fumerton’s yard and he firmly believes in the Spirit of Christmas and the old saying “It can’t be done” has changed to “who says it can’t.”

Photo-http://images.ourontario.ca/

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Apr 1930, Tue  •  Page 24
Dunlop		George		Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Lanark Co., Canada   
Foley		Michael		Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Carlow Co., Ireland   
Fumerton	Archibald W.	Lanark		Ramsay		Appleton	General Merchant; Hotel Proprietor	Ramsay Tp., Canada  
										Appleton
Fumerton	Robert A.	Lanark		Ramsay				Farmer					Ramsay Tp., Canada   

LOWE - FUMERTON
St Paul's Anglican Church, Almonte was the scene of a pretty fall wedding on Friday evening, Nov. 4, 1966, at 7 p.m., when Linda Marion Fumerton, daughter of Donald Ernest and the late Maisie Fumerton (Edwards) was united in marriage to Donald Wayne Lowe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lowe of Cedar Hill. The Rev. Harry Ploughman officiated at the double ring ceremony. The bride was given in marriage by her uncle, Mr. John Edwards of Carleton Place. She wore a floor-length gown of white silk nylon over taffeta. Her shoulder length veil was held in place by a tiara of rhinestones and she carried a bouquet of red roses with English ivy and white stephanotis. Miss Judy Southwell was maid of honour and Miss Diane Moses and Miss Marilyn Arthur were bridesmaids. They wore A-line floor-length dresses of Old Gold peau de soie trimmed with brown and wore brown accessories.

Their headdresses were of brown with gold net and carried bouquets of gold tinted mums. The little flower girl, Miss Kimberley Harris, cousin of the bride wore an exact replica of the bridesmaids' dresses with brown accessories, and carried a basket of gold tinted mums. The ring bearer, Master Tommy Edwards, cousin of the bride, ably assisted by carrying the ring securely inserted in a white satin heart shaped cushion. The groom was attended by his brother, Mr. Bill Lowe of Cedar Hill, and the ushers were Mr. Brian Fumerton, brother of the bride and Mr. Fred Lowe, cousin of the groom. The choir was assisted by Mrs. Margaret Peppy at the organ, while the bride entered the church to the singing of the hymn, Praise to the Lord, based on 103 psalm. During the signing of the register the choir sang O Perfect Love. A bountiful dinner was served in the church hall to 70 guests by the church Guild and Auxiliary. The Hon. Geo. Gomme acted as Master of Ceremonies and proposed the toast to the bride. Rev. Ploughman made a few timely remarks and Rev. Henley said Grace. A reception sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Art Lowe was held in the Pakenham Community Hall, after the young couple left amid showers of confetti and good wishes a short honeymoon. The bride's travelling suit was a three-piece blue wool with blue fur collar and black accessories. She wore a corsage of pink roses and maiden hair fern. They will reside at 130 Church Street, Almonte.


1894 Jan. 2 Carleton Place Herald
District News – Appleton
“On Wednesday afternoon last the residence of Mr. R. W. Fum?erton was alive
with guests, the occasion being the marriage of his daughter, Miss Jennie M.to Mr. Alex. McRae, of Carleton Place. Rev. G. T. Bayne performed the
ceremony. Miss Bella Fumerton, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid, an
Mr. J. A. McGregor discharged the duties of groom’s man. After the ceremony
the happy couple with their friends sat down to a sumptuous repast. The
bride was very popular and was the recipient of over fifty beautiful and cost presents. To Mr. and Mrs. McRae we extend the congratulations of a host of friends here”

Convictions: Moonshine in Darling, Party in Appleton and Firetrucks 1948

Standard
Convictions: Moonshine in Darling, Party in Appleton and Firetrucks 1948

December 1948 Almonte Gazette

Lloyd James who lives in Darling near Calabogie was convicted of keeping liquor for sale illegally in the District Magistrate’s court, here, this Thursday morning, and was sentenced to serve 60 days in the county jail.

Constable Legate of the Provincial Police laid the charge. James was defended by C. A. Mulvihill, K.C. of Arnprior. While there , was no evidence that money had changed hands the officer was able to prove that there was a great volume of traffic passing in to James’ home and that drinking was going on there.

The Magistrate decided that the rush of business was too great to be on a friendship basis and registered a conviction accordingly, A charge of supplying liquor to minors against a man who resided in Appleton was dismissed. This chap was accused of keeping the house where the long week-end party was held at which two Almonte girls and two Arnprior men working here temporarily, were “belles and beaux” of the ball.

The accused was able to show to the satisfaction of the court that he was not in charge of the house at the time of the lengthy festivities. C. J. Newton, Almonte lawyer, appeared for the accused. This was another provincial case.

M. A. McNairn, Almonte chief of police, had a couple of youths in court for traffic offences. One 16-year-old lad was fined $2 and $3 costs for hanging onto the back of the fire truck while it was returning from a fire. Another paid a like amount for riding two on a bicycle through heavy traffic returning from the fire. Another traffic case was adjourned.

Name:Lloyd James
Residence Date:1957
Residence Place:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Street Address:R. R. 1, Flower Station
Electoral District:Lanark
Occupation:Farmer

Rick Roberts12 minutes

Lloyd James was my grandmother’s cousin who owned the farm next door to hers on highway 511 in Darling Township. Though there was never a firm rule, I wasn’t encouraged to spend time at Lloyd’s place but did anyway. Until reading this excerpt I didn’t know about Lloyd’s ‘sideline’ nor his time as a guest in the county jail. This was never discusssed in front of me though I’m sure my grandmother must have known about it.. she was a tea-totaller and had very strong negative opinions about alcohol.

As a kid, hanging out at Lloyd’s was a lot of fun. A brook ran through his yard where we fished for speckled trout. He tried to teach me to play the fiddle, but my aptitude for that instrument was wanting as was my enthusiasm. One summer he needed to remove some huge rocks that were exposed up into his lane. We had great fun digging down and planting dynamite then seeking cover during the explosions. My parents would have grounded me for life if they had known.

That said, reading Lloyd James name, regardless of context, makes me smile

Run Pig Run–Shake it Off! Convictions of 1870

Throwing a Snowball is Going to Cost you $1- Your Convictions of 1898

To Steal a Barge on Ebb’s Bay— Your Convictions of 1897

Step Right Up- Here are Your Family Convictions-September, 1894

Breach of the Town Bylaws and Other Convictions.. Sept. 11 1888

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–July 17, 1885

Assault Abusive Language and Bridget McNee

The Notorious Bridget McGee of Perth

Down at the Old Perth Gaol

Justice of the Peace Convictions for the County of Lanark–Dec. 13, 1898-Who Do You Know?

Auctionering Without a License and Pigs on the Loose

Going to the Chapel –Drummond Whalen and Johnson of Carleton Place

“One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” in Lanark County

Jailhouse Rock in Lanark County Part 2

The Drunken Desperados of Carleton Place

The Young Offenders of Lanark County

Mr. Allen’s Chickens– Appleton

Standard
Mr. Allen’s Chickens– Appleton

Newspapers seemed to control our local towns and it wasn’t hard to sway the townsfolk into some sort of rabble rousing. Take in point some fine fowl, over 325 to be exact, that resided in Appleton belonging to the Herald’s Mr. Sam Allen. The joke was that Mr. Allen’s chickens were so well esteemed they had taken their fair share of prizes at the Almonte Fair. In fact too much so– as there were a few dozen articles about his chickens!

The “opposite side” joked that maybe a visit to “the Appleton hood” by some could relieve him of some of his fair feathered friends. Was this a warning to Mr. Allen that his poultry should enter the KFC Witness Protection Plan? Or, was it to be soon a Winner Winner Chicken Dinner for all in Lanark County? In everything– the rooster, human or fowl made and still makes the most news. It has been proven many times in the Almonte Gazette and the Carleton Place Herald. Trust me!

Anything less than the best is a felony
Love it or leave it, You better gain way
You better hit bull’s eye, The kid don’t play..

‘Winner Winner Chicken Dinner’? Consolidated Tea Co. Sparks Street

Doin’ the Funky Chicken in Lanark County

“I Like My Chicken Fryin’ Size” said the Pig

Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

Standard
Update — Teacher Fired in Appleton School May 1931 –Annie Neilson

A bitter dispute that arose in the Appleton school section over the action of School Inspector J. C. Spence, of Carleton Place, in suspending the teaching certificate of Miss Annie Neilson, teacher of the junior room in the Appleton school, was settled, Tuesday, when Chief Inspector Greer of Toronto had a conference with Inspector Spence, the teachers and the school trustees. Appleton School has two class rooms, the senior one taught by Miss Ida Paul who has been there 34 years end the Junior form in charge of Miss Neilson who commenced her duties there at the opening of the last September term.

Miss Neilson comes from Appleton and taught school in Alberta for upwards of nine years before taking a position at home. The trouble began over the question of promoting a little girl. Miss Neilson’s predecessor is said to have recommended the pupil’s promotion when she was leaving, but Miss Neilson derided she would be better to remain a little longer in the grade -where she then was. Inspector Spence was appealed to and is said to have recom­mended that the child be promoted.

Friction followed and the Inspector, it is said, suspended the teacher’s per­mit to become effective on May 4, 1931. Trustees sided with Miss Neilson, and while the Inspector’s action made it impossible for them to use the room in the school formerly presided over by the teacher, they opened a temporary class room in the community hall and put Miss Neilson in charge of it. Lessons began there on Tuesday, May the 5th.

Several conferences were held at one of which J. A. Craig, M. L. A., for North Lanark is said to have been present to pour oil on the troubled waters. Apparently his oil was not effective, because a call was sent to the Department of Education and the chief inspector, Mr. Greer, was sent to Appleton to see what he could do about it. After a conference the purpose of which was to smooth over the difficulty it is said it was decided to leave the child where she is at present and the teacher, Miss Neilson, was reinstated in her position. The matter, it is understood, is still before the Department and the present solution may be but a temporary one.

Meanwhile several ratepayers of the Appleton School Section drew up a petition which is being circulated through the county and will be forwarded to other parts of Ontario praying the Government to discard its new legislation which greatly increases the powers of public school inspectors. Authors of the petition claim the new legislation, that came into effect recently, takes away all powers from school trustees. They can’t even buy wood without the school inspector’s sanction.

Trustees say the new control is the consolidated school system that Former Premier Ferguson tried to put over masquerading under another in the unit system. Those behind the petition claim this inspectorate is not the oniy one in which friction has arisen over the added powers the Government has given to school inspectors. It is the same in other districts and they think school boards representative of tax payers in country school sections should be given back the control over school administration that the trustees formerly enjoyed.

Under the new legislation school inspectors are no longer appointed by county councils, but by the Province had in return for this concession on the part of the county councils the Provincial Government has assumed the burden of paying the inspectors. When asked about the Appleton affair Inspector Spence said he did not care to comment. It was unfortunate, he thought, that the matter should be given publicity. There were only a couple of school sections in the district where trouble had been experienced and the more said about it the worse it would be for all concerned and particularly for the interest in education 

May 1931

read-Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
19 Dec 1912, Thu  •  Page 14

Annie Neilson on right side of clipping

annies name is on the very bottom of the right hand column

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada19 Dec 1912, Thu  •  Page 14

Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

Standard
Appleton–Memories of Arthur Robinson –The Federated Women’s Institutes of Eastern Ontario

Also read-Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

Appleton General Store – Names Names Names— Wesley West Appleton and Almonte Merchant

The Appleton General Store and Polly Parrot

Hot off the Press –Old Appleton Post Office & General Store –Sarah More

Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Miss Tena Stewart War Heroine — Almonte Appleton and Carleton Place

Standard
Miss Tena Stewart War Heroine — Almonte Appleton and Carleton Place

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Nov 1927, Sat  •  Page 30

World War I veteran: Nursing Sister
Canadian Medical Army Corps

Christina (Tena) May Stewart was born on May 25, 1881 in Almonte, Ontario.

She graduated from the Winnipeg General Hospital School of Nursing in 1916 and enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) in November 1916. Nursing sister Stewart served in England and was posted to the Duchess of Connaught’s Canadian Red Cross Hospital, Taplow and Granville Canadian Special Hospital, Buxton. Her sister, Ethel Stewart (Class of 1915) also served during the war with the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAIMNS) and with the CAMC.

In November 1918, nursing sister Stewart contracted bronchitis and pneumonia and was hospitalized for several months. She returned to Canada in March 1919 and was sent to the Gravenhurst Sanatorium in Gravenhurst, Ontario due to poor health. She died there on November 7, 1927 and was buried in the family plot in Almonte, Ontario on Armistice Day – November 1927

Newspaper clipping – Nursing Sister [Tena M. Stewart] Going Overseas

War Nurse Dies After Long Fight With Ill Health
Miss Christena Stewart Was With Navel Forces In the Great War
Served in the Mediterranean, In Egypt and Other Parts of War Zone, Her Health Broke Down Under the Strenuous Duties She Underwent.

Mr Alexander Stewart was called to the Military Hospital, London, on Saturday by the very serious illness of his sister, Miss Tena Stewart, R.N., who passed away on Monday afternoon about 3 o’clock. Miss Lizzie Stewart, of Toronto, accompanied by Misses Margaret Stewart of Montreal and Miss Mabel of Toronto, accompanied the body which arrived at home on Tuesday evening. The sympathy of the whole surrounding country goes out to Mr and Mrs Donald Stewart and family in the death of their eldest daughter, Christena May.

Daughter of the Farm
Miss Stewart was born on the farm from which she was laid to rest. Although just in the prime of life, it falls to the lot of few people to see so much or so varied a life. Educated in the Public school at Appleton and at the High Schools of Almonte and Carleton Place and after teaching school for a few years she went to Winnipeg where she and her sister, Ethel, now Mrs Dr (Harvey) Wilkins Morley, trained in the Civic Hospital for the nursing profession. When the war broke, both volunteered for service and were accepted. Miss Tena was with the navel forces in the Mediterranean, in Egypt and other parts of the war zone. So strenuous did the life prove that it left her with a weakened constitution. Instead of being discharged when the war was over, she was sent to the sanatorium at Gravenhurst. From that time until her death she had been putting up a fight for life that was the wonder of all who met her. With a brave bright face and a courageous heart she faced the struggle with ill health, with never a showing of the white feather, faced it as she had faced her job in war time with a smile and a cheery word for all with whom she came in contact.

Winnipeg General Hospital School of Nursing, Class of 1916

Seeking For Health
During these years Miss Stewart had taken many a long hard trip in search of health. To Arizona and to Vancouver, she went, and only this summer she made the tiresome trip from Vancouver to Almonte. In the annals of Almonte and Ramsay Miss Stewart will find a high place, She lived a beautiful life and when her country was in the throes of war, she saw her duty and she did it. She made the supreme sacrifice. The immediate relatives to mourn her passing are her father and mother, her brother Alexander on the home farm, and three sisters, Mrs Dr Wilkins Morley, of the U.S.A., Miss Margaret in Montreal and Miss Mabel in Toronto.

The Almonte Gazette, Almonte, Ont., Friday 11 November 1927, page 1
_____

War Nurse Laid To Rest Veterans Bearing Remains
Large Attendance of Mourners At Funeral of Miss C.M. Stewart
Wreath From the Canadian Nursing Sister Was Afterwards Placed In the Hall of Fame at Ottawa On Armistice Day.

There was a very large attendance of mourners at the funeral of the late Miss Christena May Stewart, veteran nursing sister of the Great War, which took place on Thursday. As was stated in last week’s issue of the Gazette; Miss Stewart passed away at London, Ont, on the afternoon of Thanksgiving Day after a constant struggle to regain her health since her return to Canada in April, 1919. There was a short service at the home of her parents, Mr and Mrs Donald Stewart, near Appleton, and the remains were taken to St John’s Presbyterian Church, where an impressive service was conducted by Rev W.H. McCracken, minister of the church, assisted by Rev J.M. Rutherford minister of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Interment was made in the family burying place in the Auld Kirk Cemetery. The pallbearers were six returned soldiers. Messrs W.R. Caldwell, George E. Scroggie, and J.L. Craig, of Carleton Place; Dr E.F. McGregor, Wilmer Campbell and Max Young, of Almonte. Among the many beautiful floral tributes were a blanket of flowers from the family and a wreath inscribed to her memory from the Canadian Nursing Sisters, which was placed on the Nursing Sister’s Tablet in the Hall of Fame, Parliament Buildings, Ottawa, during the Armistice Day Service.

The Almonte Gazette, Almonte, Ont., Friday November 18, 1927, page 1

Note:
Obituary articles contributed by Gary J. Byron, no. 49329383

Women of the Red Cross — Mary Slade –Larry Clark

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Did You Ever Notice This in Beckwith Park? Thanks to Gary Box

Symington and Family — Odds and Ends Lanark County

Standard
Symington and Family — Odds and Ends Lanark County
Tom Edwards
December 28, 2017  · 



Looks like supper with Grandma Edwards. Mom, Dad, Ruth Craig, Eldon Craig, maybe Josie Symington at the end of the table, next one I don’t know, then Uncle Johnny and Essie Erskine.

Brenda Craig Shewchukfrom left, Ilene, John, Ruth, Eldon, Mr. Symington, (owned the house) Brian Fumerton, Uncle Johnny, Aunt Essie, Elsie, Ray,
SEE below– Women’s Institute
Name:Joseph Henry Symington
Gender:Male
Age:86
Birth Date:20 Mar 1853
Birth Place:Ontario
Death Date:22 Jan 1940
Death Place:Almonte, Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Father:Charles Symington
Mother:Ann Symington

Marg McNeely
.

Hi Linda…..here is a pic of employees of the BNS in 1957 at Xmas party at the Lake Park Lodge.
Front row L-R…..Kathryn Downie, Noel Dagenais, Mrs. Cross, Mr. Cross (Bank Manager), Ray Eldridge, Phyllis Donnelly.
Back row L-R…..Irene Taylor, Marg (Tosh) McNeely, Wayne Symington, Ruby MacPherson, Doris Willows.
All were local people except for Noel and Ray

As a side line they installed, 486 lockers for storing perishable foods and this was a great success from the beginning. At the present time all these units are rented and it is proposed to create more of them. Mr. Milton Symington has been the manager of the plant during the years that have passed since its inception. He will be retained in that position and it is understood the new management proposes to adopt a more aggressive policy and to expand along various lines. Read–Cold Storage Plant in Almonte- Meat Locker Trivia

Well, as the standoff continued two young lads Alex Symington and Cecil McIntyre, decided they would do their good deed as it was also Boy Scout Week. They discussed a plan among themselves and then began to pelt the skunk with snowballs. The skunk still didn’t move from either defiance or stupidity. Minutes later with both sides trying to decide what to do, the skunk just decided to move and sit on the side of the road for a spell. I am pleased to also offer the news that Mel Royce finished clearing that road for everyone that lived on the 12th Line of Ramsay.–He Almost Became a Dead Skunk in the Middle of the 12th Line

Information about the Symington Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Also read-

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton

Standard
Snippets– James Wilson and Nelson Syme — Appleton
Photo- SEE below– Women’s Institute
SYME, Nelson Aberdeen Peacefully after a lengthy illness at the Carleton Place Hospital on Monday, November 20, 2006, at the age of 80. Loving husband of Emma (nee Howie) for 56 years. Dearly loved father of Glen (Ellen), Karen (Lonny Lytle) and Audrey Syme. Proud grandfather of Travis, Trudy and Jordan. Predeceased by his brothers Orville and Milburn and his sister Lois. Friends may call at the ALAN R. BARKER FUNERAL HOME, 19 McArthur Avenue, Carleton Place, Ontario on Wednesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service Thursday in the chapel at 2:00 p.m. Interment to follow at Auld Kirk Cemetery, Almonte. For those who wish, a donation to the Carleton Place and District Memorial Hospital would be appreciated by the family.

Back row standing:  Nelson Syme, Karen (Syme) Lytle, Murray Lowry, Keith Lowry
Front row:  Inez McCoy’s nephew, Beth (Lowry) Nanne, Allan Drummond
Nelson and Emma resided at this farm located at 406 River Road beside Appleton Village.  Son Glen, now operates. read-The Story of the Appleton Sleigh Ride–Audrey Syme

406 River Road beside Appleton Village
Original and Subsequent Owners: An 1829 Crown Patent, for all 200 acres, was granted to the Canada Company. In 1842, they sold the same to James Wilson for $550.00. 14 February 1851, James Wilson sold 65 acres of the West half of lot 3 to William Wilson for $1.00. Four months later, William & Flora Wilson sold to Albert Teskey for $64.00. 26 Jan 1883, Teskey sold to Duncan Miller for $95.00. It has been owned by various owners since that time. From Hot off the Press–Sarah More

ON another subject you can also read: Please take the Devil Out of Me? Rev. James Wilson of Lanark

Information about the Wilson Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–

Snippets– The Drummond Farm — Aida Drummond

Standard
Snippets–  The Drummond Farm — Aida Drummond

Photo from Appleton W.I see below

1871 Census

Name:Smuel Drummond[Samuel Drummond]
Gender:Male
Origin:Scottish (Scotish)
Age:12
Birth Date:1859
Birth Place:Ontario
Residence Place:Ramsay, Lanark North, Ontario
District Number:80
Subdistrict:a
Division:02
Religion:Church Of Scotland
Going to School:Y
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgePeter Drummond45Jane Drummond39William Drummond19Margret Drummond17Mary Drummond14Sa
muel Drummond12Daniel Drummond6Peter Drummond3George Drummond1

Aida Margaret Drummond
BIRTH
24 Jul 1907Ramsay, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
DEATH
20 May 1989 (aged 81)Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIAL
Auld Kirk Cemetery
Mississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
PLOT
Block F

The Almonte Gazette
Almonte, Ontario, Canada
Wednesday, May 31, 1989, p. 12

DRUMMOND, Aida Margaret – In hospital, at Almonte, on Saturday, May 20, 1989. Aida Margaret Drummond of Almonte. In Her 82nd Year. Beloved daughter of the late Sam Drummond and his wife May Paterson. Dear sister of Agnes of Deseronto. Predeceased by two brothers, Howard and Ralph and by one sister, Elsie. Friends called at the C. R. Gamble Funeral Home, 127 Church Street, Almonte on Sunday. Service was held in the Chapel on Monday. Rev. Clifford Evans officiated. Cremation Pinecrest crematorium. Interment of cremains, Aulk Kirk Cemetery, Almonte

1821-1945 Oldest Family Farm Property –Mcllquham Genealogy

The Derry Farm of Angus McDiarmid

The Farmer is the Man

Gravelle Toshack Almonte Farmer Killed By Train

Which McNeely Farmhouse is this? Quarry Road

Sarah Duff McPherson and John Paul — Mount Blow Farm

More Photos of the Hazwill Pony Farm… Larry Clark — Wylies– 1962-1963

Farm Real Estate etc 1903-1908 Lanark County — Names Names Names

Anyone Remember The Farm???? The Hippie Years of Lanark County

The Lanark County Farm Tour 1983

The Farm of Alec and Chrissie Tosh — David Tosh

Lanark Farm Life is Not so Bad- 1951

Once Upon a Time on the Farm

Farming Could be a Dangerous Business in Lanark County? Who Do You Know?

She Doesn’t Think My Tractor is Sexy–The Farmer’s Wife 1889

Death of Local Farms in 2025? 1975 article

Wind Storm in Ashton- Heath Ridge Farms 1976

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

The McNaughton Farm– Memories Ray Paquette

Looking for Information on the Native Fort Farm of Fred Sadler of Almonte

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

Information about the Drummond Farm came from:

About WI
Women’s Institute is a local, provincial, national and international organization that promotes women, families and communities. Our goal is to empower women to make a difference.

About FWIC

The idea to form a national group was first considered in 1912. In 1914, however, when the war began the idea was abandoned. At the war’s end, Miss Mary MacIsaac, Superintendent of Alberta Women’s Institute, revived the idea. She realized the importance of organizing the rural women of Canada so they might speak as one voice for needed reforms, and the value of co-ordinating provincial groups for a more consistent organization. In February 1919, representatives of the provinces met in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to form the Federated Women’s Institutes of Canada.

The identity of the Women’s Institute still lies profoundly in its beginnings. The story of how this historic organization came to be is one that resonates with women all over the world, and is engrained in the mission and vision Ontario WI Members still live by today. CLICK here–