Tag Archives: apples

Whose Apples Belonge to Who? Weskett Vs Sturgeon

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Whose Apples Belonge to Who? Weskett Vs Sturgeon
Almonte Gazette 1898

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
10 Aug 1898, Wed  •  Page 1

Who has the law on their side in such situations?

If the trunk of a fruit tree is on your neighbors’ property, the tree and the fruit it bears belong to them—even if fruit-laden branches overhang your property.

If the trunk of a tree straddles the boundary line between your property and your neighbors’, it’s a “boundary tree.” Each of you owns all of it, jointly. In that event, you have the right to fruit growing on branches that are on your side of the line. You might also have a right to fruit on the other side of the line, but you’d have to go on your neighbor’s land to get it.

What if apples have fallen from your neighbor’s tree onto the ground on your side of the property line? Wanting to pick them up and put them to use is perfectly understandable. But, in some states, the falls still belong to your neighbors.

On the one hand, you can’t legally pick up and eat the fruit. On the other hand, your neighbors can’t legally enter your land to retrieve it.

“I had become acquainted with the Ryan family, who lived next to the mill I operated in 1876. It appears the boys in the mill would put a nail on the end of the pole and pick the apples of their trees”. Thomas Alfred Code Perth…read..The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 10- Code Family – I conjured to myself: “You will know me later!” And Peter McLaren did.

The Story of an Old Apple Orchard

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The Story of an Old Apple Orchard

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Jennifer E. Ferris has taken a  lot of time and effort this year to document Lanark County apple orchards. I kept hearing about one in Kanata folks used to go too and today I found out all about it.

There was once three Brennnan brothers: John, James, and Nicholas, and in the 30s they worked for in Ottawa for a gentleman called Fred Matatall who was a the comptroller and vice-president of Ottawa’s Freiman’s department stores. Matatall bought an old stone home from Nicholas Brennan in 1953 for $12,000 and he decided to renovate the old home and strip all the old paint. What he found when he removed the old paint was beautiful pine wood- so that’s what he called the old Brennan home,“Pine Wood”. Soon it became a destiny for the women of Oglivy’s to have their grand teas in the cozy kitchen.

Apparently, Fred wasn’t so beloved by his neighbours after damming up Watt’s Creek to create a fish pond on his property, and he caused a drought for his neighbours. They decided to plant five kinds of apple trees and named their 40 acres Pinewood Orchards. The Mattatalls never got to see the first apples harvested from their orchard. After a NCC expropriation, the NCC rented out the estate, as well as the wood-frame house that had seen three generations of Brennans  just a short distance south of the Queensway/Eagleson exit.

 

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By then, Gerald and Ruth Brennan were living in a modern brick bungalow. Because the bungalow sat on the northeast corner of Lot 1, Concession 1, an easy walk from Gerald’s day job, the Brennans found themselves in the awkward position of being tenants of the NCC, in a house they had built to raise their family.  During those years, Gerald watched as speculators snapped up land ever faster, and suburbia crept ever closer. The first planned community near the western tip of the Greenbelt was Lynwood Village in Nepean. It was built by Bill Teron, the developer and architect who went on to build Kanata.

 

 - Historic Home Pinewood One of the most...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  17 Oct 1970, Sat,  Page 45

With files from Silver Heights and NCC Watch

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

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Whatever Happened to the Lanark County Greening Apple?

The A-Peeling History of Local Bananas

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

Lost Lanark Legacy Fruit Trees– Need Help!

Lost Lanark Legacy Fruit Trees– Need Help!

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Lost Lanark Legacy Fruit Trees– Need Help!

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Photo-Cold Hands Warm Earth – blogger

 

Jennifer E. Ferris is at it again. She has helped me with a few lost historical Lanark projects and now she is set out to document Lanark Apples and she has posted this– so if you would like your apple trees documented contact Jennifer at jenni.fer.sees@gmail.com

Wanted, news of old apple trees in your yard. Big and small, summer, fall and winter apples. Seeking to find old apple trees of all kinds. They may not look big in the trunk, or tall in the branches, or they may be little giants too. Dwarf to full size, they came in various sizes.

Please help reclaim our heritage, and share the whereabouts of any apple trees you may know of. Un pruned for many years, they may be overgrown, thick with branches and may only grow small little ‘pig apples’ now, but at one time they may have been amazing!

Please don’t cut them down, or do anything drastic. Please do save them from extinction, and keep them alive. If you wish to prune, read up first before making any cuts.

Back to my query. I am seeking a number of old apple varieties that may have been local once; Hume, Lawfam, Linda, Lobo, Atlas, Alexander, Wolf River, Melba, Joyce, Old Macintosh, Wealthy, Transparent, Duchess of Oldenburg, Fameuse (or Snow), Iroquois, Gravenstein, Russet, Pippins, or Greenings. There may be others whose names I have not discovered, but I would be delighted to learn of them.

I would like, with your help, to build a knowledge base of our heritage apple (or plum, pear, etc) fruit trees, in Lanark county to start, other areas as time permits. Please comment here or send me a private message. Even if you don’t know much about your tree, there are ways to find out what kind it is. Please reply, let’s find out together, and start saving our history and heritage from extinction.

I would be ever grateful for your help! I can also be reached by email at jenni.fer.sees@gmail.com

Jennifer E Ferris's Profile Photo, Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, closeup and outdoor

Jennifer has just started a Facebook page called Lost Lanark Legacy Fruit Trees to document everything.. CLICK here

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading.jpg

Whatever Happened to the Lanark County Greening Apple?

The A-Peeling History of Local Bananas

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

My Thanksgiving Treats for Kids –RICE KRISPIE FAUX APPLES – GUMMY WORM SURPRISE

 

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Whatever Happened to the Lanark County Greening Apple?

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Whatever Happened to the Lanark County Greening Apple?

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From the Perth & District Historical Society–CLICK HERE

Did you know one of the oldest Canadian varieties, known since the 1650s, and widely planted in Canada and the USA. Its main use is in cooking.
Our local mystery this month concerns the Lanark Greening apple, which was developed in Fallbrook, Bathurst Township, and became famous early in this area – and yet there are no known trees remaining here today. Perhaps, the old green apple tree on your property is one?

The Lanark Greening apple was developed by Robert Anderson, at his Fallbrook nursery, located on Concession 8, Lot 21, in Bathurst. From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, Robert and his son John provided fresh fruit – and fruit tree seedlings, including the Lanark apple – throughout Lanark and Renfrew Counties. The apple is said to have been large, hard, sweet and long-lasting.

In her book, Claudia Smith relates: “The local fruit salesmen (Robert and John) delivered saplings around the countryside, in the spring. They peddled the rootstock for their newly developed apple, the Lanark Greening, from the back of a wagon. This new apple was a fine hard-cooking apple and a ‘a good keeper’. To this day, Lanark Greening apple trees can be found in orchards or gardens near abandoned farm buildings or next to the stone foundations of a log house long fallen through time.”

There were other greening apples on the market in the 1800s, perhaps some of which might also remain on our local properties today. The Rhode Island Greening was the second most popular apple in Ontario orchards, prior to 1875 (later lost market due to disease susceptibility). It was a hardy, crooked tree, with hard, large, round, light green fruit.

Agriculture Canada has not lost the apple – it is listed in their Gene Resources archive as ‘CN 102945 Lanark Greening’. Seedlings for the Lanark are still available, in at least one southern Ontario nursery.

Do you happen to know where a local Lanark Greening apple tree exists?

Thanks to Claudia Smith, for part of this information, from the book ‘Gypsies, Preachers and Big White Bears: One Hundred Years on Country Roads’.

Please email us your thoughts about this mystery: perthhs@gmail.com

  • Barrie and Pat Crampton advise that they have a green apple tree on their property that might be a candidate for the lost Lanark Greening apple. Barrie was the person who raised the question of what had happened to this local apple, examples of which seem to have been lost in our community. Their tree is located in Chaplin Heights, which was part of the Chaplin Dairy farm in Glen Tay (a Bathurst business that served this area for many decades – the story of which we hope to eventually have on our website).
  • Bill Barratt has a tree on his property near McDonalds Corners that is a major producer of a very large, tasty and long-lasting green apple. The apple was said by an orchard owner in Picton to make the best cider he had ever tasted that was not produced by multiple varieties. One source thought it might be a ‘Gibson’ variety which was apparently grown in a McDonalds Corners area.
  • The McFarlane family in north Drummond/North Elmsley Township have a greening apple tree on their property in an old orchard, that produces apples with some of the Lanark Greening characteristics – fairly large, and best when harvested after frost. They also make great pie and crisp, which will probably attract the apple judges.

 

 

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GREEN APPLE PIE
4 c. green apples cored, peeled and sliced
1 c. sugar
1/4 tsp. lemon juice
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/4 tsp. nutmeg
butter
Combine sliced green apples, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and lemon juice. Place all ingredients in an unbaked pie shell. Add a few dabs of butter. Top with unbaked pie crust. (Be sure to cut slits in top crust to let steam escape.) Bake in preheated 375 degree oven until top crust is a golden brown.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading.jpg

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

My Thanksgiving Treats for Kids –RICE KRISPIE FAUX APPLES – GUMMY WORM SURPRISE

 

 

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

 

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How Do You End Being a Popcorn Farmer? — Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

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That’s right farming popcorn. Call me stupid– but you could have fooled me!
The telltale tassels are the giveaway; tassels on sweet corn and field corn stand upright at attention. But popcorn plants are noticeably different — they have floppier tassels.

But since that’s just a superficial variation, in order to get a deeper look at the differences between farming corn and popcorn we asked Lanark County farmers Brent Fetterly and Janice Tulloch from Diamondbrook Farm about common popcorn stories and misconceptions: like whether, for instance, on a hot day a popcorn field would just start exploding. They laughed and said no.
But after doing some research, apparently that has happened — at least sort of. In 2010 in Kentucky, a popcorn farmer’s crop burst through its kernels, which had formed at very high temperatures and then filled with water, causing the rupture.

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That said, popcorn typically pops after being dried; the heated kernels retain a modicum of moisture that turns to steam, expanding corn into the pop zone.

Kernels that don’t pop? At least among in-the-know popcorn farmers, they’re called spinsters or old maids. Somewhere in the middle are parchies, the nickname for kernels that as much as triple in size without popping. Wow… Just Wow… You need to come to the Carleton Place farmer’s Market to see it for yourself.

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Diamondbrook Farm is located at Prestonvale, between Ferguson’s Falls and Balderson. A part of the farm is dedicated to grain crops, but we specialize in apples, sweet corn and a variety of squash They have Apples , squash and popcorn are available at the farm .  DUE TO A LATE MAY FROST THEY WILL NOT HAVE APPLES AVAILABLE THIS YEAR. There were a few last week however at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market.

Brent Fetterly and Janice Tulloch

Email address: 

diamondbrook@hotmail.com

Location: 

1251 Prestonvale Rd Lanark

“Shop The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market —- Because there is no place like home!”

Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

7 Beckwith St.
Carleton Place, Ontario
 
(613) 809-0660

830 am to 1230 am

Don’t Waste One Jelly Bean Moment in Life — Christine Dixon

How Big is Your Head— of CABBAGE? — Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Take the Pickle Challenge at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

May Proulx for President of your Next Tea Party!– Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Waratah Downs Doesn’t Sell Cheeseburgers in Paradise! — Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

You Don’t Need to Go By the Pool to Get Dip — Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Holy Cannoli Macaroni! From Italy With Love at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Grandma Garrett is on Fire at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

The Secret Ingredient is Always Cheese — Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Did I See your Mum Knitting at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market?

Did You See the Blue Heron at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market?

Wonder Woman lives at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Why Shop at Farmers’ Markets and Remember Tupperware?

The Secret Lives of Pets – Tail Wagger Threads Now at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

The Big Buzz at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market — Get Bee-autiful!

Carleton Place Farmer’s Market Re-Invents the McGriddle

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A Fiesta in the Strawberry Patch at the Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Visit the Drama Free Zone Wall at The Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

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Put Your Chutney Where Your Mouth Is! — Carleton Place Farmers Market

Missy Moo’s Magical Hand Cream – Carleton Place Farmer’s Market

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place