Tag Archives: anglican

Clippings of St. John’s Church Innisville

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Clippings of St. John’s Church Innisville
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

in 1888 St. George’s severed the connection with Almonte and became united with St. John’s Church at Boyd’s now known as St. John’s Church, Innisville. And for the first time the records state “that St. George’s Clayton and St. John’s Innisville, were made into a separate parish under the rectorship of Rev. John Osborne.”

St John’s Anglican Church, Innisville. Church was built in 1911.
Photo courtesy of Catherine and Joe Phelan, Perth, ON. File date is 29 August, 2009. Charles Dobie click

Parish of Mississippi Lake
October 23, 2017  · 
St John’s Innisville held a great yard sale this past weekend, with all sorts of treasures to be found. Thanks to Nancy, Jean, and Peter for their help and salesmanship!

Parish of Mississippi Lake
October 31, 2017  · 

On Sunday, St John’s Innisville hosted a fabulous concert by award-winning bluegrass band, Concession 23! Thanks to the talented musicians, faithful organizers, and toe-tapping audience for a great afternoon, enjoyed by all.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Aug 1973, Sat  •  Page 42

However in 1888 they severed the connection with Almonte and became united with St. John’s Church at Boyd’s now known as St. John’s Church, Innisville. And for the first time the records state “that St. George’s Clayton and St. John’s Innisville, were made into a separate parish under the rectorship of Rev. John Osborne.”

Perth Courier 1889

Innisville Inklings—Mrs. John Findlay and children of Deloraine, Manitoba, arrived to meet her friends last week in the County of Lanark, the place she was born and brought up. At present she is with her father John Kellough, Ramsay. She is a sister to Mrs. Sutherland, Boyd’s. Her husband was left behind but he sold his possessions in Manitoba and is now taking a trip to British Columbia. After he is through with his journeys he will return to meet his fair partner in life in this dear old home of his.

Innisville Inklings: Miss Murphy, a young lady of Wolfe Island, was visiting her brother-in-law Michael Grey for the past several weeks. She returned to her home last week. — Two boys of our own raising when called by name are Messrs. James Sullivan and Francis Lambert. These two sturdies have been farming near Grand Forks, Dakota for some years past. They give very satisfactory reports of their new home and claim that their success has been abundant. At present we are enjoying their visit but do not know how long they intend to stay.

Innisville Inklings: John Sutherland is this week visiting the place of his boyhood that is, in Gananoque. He was born there and I am sure he will feel small when he is shown the place where the notable event took place. — Mr. Samuel Rathwell, a young law student of Toronto University, son of John Rathwell, Esq., is now on his holiday visiting friends. — John Findlay son of John Kellough Ramsay, visited friends in this part last week. He sold his possessions in Manitoba and for the last several weeks was visiting at Gladstone, Man. He is now at Ottawa. — Arthur Jackson is for a spell freed from intense study and can now enjoy some relaxation. — Wesley Halfpenny, a relative to people in Boyd’s, is, I suppose, spending his vacation delightfully in the quiet part of the country. He is from below the capital.

Innisville Inklings: A grand time was spent last Wednesday, 26th Dec., in the hall at Innisville. The concert was got up in aid of the Sunday School of St. John’s and Trinity Churches. Mr. A. Code of Ottawa filled the responsible position of chairman and in a most acceptable style. The Messrs Bert of Almonte took part in the program. Beautiful choruses were sung by the Rathwells and Kinches; readings and recitations by Messrs R. Patterson, Carleton Place, T. Rathwell and F. Rathwell and many more taking part in the entertainment which proved a noble exercise.

Innisville Inklings: A happy evening was spent at the residence of J. Rathwell on New Year’s night. A large party of young folk were assembled together and had a splendid time. People cannot miss but enjoy themselves with our genial and illustrious reeve. He is so full of fun that he can make your sides ache laughing.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Sullivan sold his farm of 100 acres and all the stock except one team of horses to Mr. Thomas Ruttle, about a week ago, for $2,500.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Sullivan left last week for Harrisville, New York. The rest of the family left a week or so ago. The young folks of Ferguson’s Falls showed their love to the family by making some parties for them. We are sorry to miss friend Jack so if there is anything better on the other side of the line then what fair Lanark possesses then our ardent wish is that he may possess it. John was a good neighbor one who was always ready in time of need and one that we regret to lose.

Innisville Inklings: Mr. Thomas Willows has erected a rich and magnificent bronze colored Scotch granite monument to memorialize the departure of his beloved wife Mary Code Willows and his little son Milton Willows

Innisville Inklings: Mr. John Finlay, who has lately come from Manitoba and who has been visiting friends here and in other parts has, we understand, bought out the dairy business of Robert Lattimer, Carleton Place, and intends taking possession of said business on the 12th Feb.
Innisville Inklings: Miss Murphy, a young lady of Wolfe Island, was visiting her brother-in-law Michael Grey for the past several weeks. She returned to her home last week. — Two boys of our own raising when called by name are Messrs. James Sullivan and Francis Lambert. These two sturdies have been farming near Grand Forks, Dakota for some years past. They give very satisfactory reports of their new home and claim that their success has been abundant. At present we are enjoying their visit but do not know how long they intend to stay.



Innisville Inklings: Benjamin Murdoch, a former music teacher in this county wrote a letter lately to one of his friends in this part and in it he states his intention as follows: that he and his wife (formerly a young lady of Clayton) will come across the ocean next summer to visit

Lanark Baptist Church – Elaine Playfair’s Clippings

The Deachman Brothers Revivals of Lanark County

Dont’ bring Home a Baptist Preacher!

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

The Little White Country Church in Prestonvale- The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Another One Bites the Dust –In Memory of the Holiness Movement Church Building (Hornerites)

The Ramsay Free Church on the 8th Concession

More About Churches and Things Part 2

Robert M. More — Reformed Presbyterian Church of Almonte– By Sarah More

Miss Christena Dunlop –Teacher Church Street School

The Unbelievable History of the Cameronian Church

More Notations of Christ Church Ashton

The Church On the Hill in the Middle of Hood

Everything You Wanted to Know About Auld Kirk

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Old Churches of Lanark County

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

Dugald Campbell –Memories of Ramsay Township and Almonte–Ministers Hunters and Schools

St. Andrew’s United Church

Clayton United Church Quilt Fran Cooper

And They Kept Singing in Church While it was on Fire

In Memory of David Scharf — Almonte United Church Tragedy

The Almonte Fire 1955– Almonte United Church

St. Peter’s Celestine Church Pakenham

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Did You Know the Ashton Anglican Church Dates Back to 1845?

Lanark’s First Church in the Middle of the Forest

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

The Remains of the Bethel Methodist Church

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

St. Augustine’s Church and Christ Church

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Do You Remember Yoshiba’s Retreat? Clayton

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Do You Remember Yoshiba’s Retreat? Clayton

In 2001 Yoshiba, which was a Christian Spiritual Retreat was invited persons or groups to cintinue the ministry orvided by its Anglican founders Frank and Robbie Anderson on the 20 acre property near Clayton.

Situated by the Indian River the woods, stream and labyrinth made this an ideal place for restoration. The home was built in 1974 had been used by many individuals and groups that came for the day or stayed longer. The idea came from visiting the Burswood Angliacn centre for Healing in England and felt a call to develop a sanctuary.

The word “Yoshiba” found in Psalm 23 is Hebrew and means ‘ he restoreth my soul”

There were no fees for daily visits, quiett days etc and only suggested donations for long term stays.

After 27 years in 2001 the Andersons were ready to move on to new challenges.

Frank and Robbie were from Alberta and New Brunswick and met in the army. and their three childen in 2001 were now adults.

They were hoping for a quick response for someone to take over in 2001– so the question is? What happened to Yoshiba as 20 years has past.

Dawn JonesI believe it is now a private residence. on the 10 concession (formerly Darling Twp, now Lanark Highlands.) Frank and Robina (Robbie) sold the property and moved to Almonte. They were good friends to my grandmother Mary. Took her to church many Sundays. They are all deceased now. God love them.

Added Reading

The Hagarty Township Hippies 1981 – The Buchanan Scrapbooks

Anyone Remember The Farm???? The Hippie Years of Lanark County

I Bet You Didn’t Know this About St. James in Carleton Place

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I Bet You Didn’t Know this About St. James in Carleton Place

 

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Photo Linda Seccaspina

The first church built in 1834 was a frame building, built in the Georgian style and was a 64 feet long and 32 wide and had a gallery.

The tower of the church which was 44 feet high was maintained over a porch that was the width of the buildings that had 4 columns supporting its roof.

In August of 1834 Bishop Charles James Stewart of Quebec came and confirmed 97 of their parishioners. The congregation of St. James was 300, of which most were farming families.

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They began to build the present stone building in 1881 and it officially opened on Wednesday, January 11, 1882.

The church bell dates back to 1896, and at one time it rang with help of a rope outside and a ‘special rhythm’ by the bell ringer. It was also used as a local fire alarm which used to call the local volunteers. It weighs 3/4 of a ton.

The church bell used to count hours replacing the now silent Post Office clock.

In 1974 lightening struck the bell that was now electronically controlled. Beginning at 8 am the hour was tolled until 7 pm. At noon, 6 and 7 pm carillon hymns once played.

Canon Jarvis 1884-90 designed the oak furnishings of the chancel. In 1830 the kneeler and the communion rail needlepoint was done by the rector’s wife Mrs. E. Boswell.

Other current needlepoint cushions and kneelers were handmade and donated by long time organist Ralph Langtry.

In 1903 a Cassavant Pipe Organ was installed and it was an air hand pumped which was electrified in 1955, and rebuilt in 1974 with a new console and was dedicated that year.

If you sit in the second section, first pew on the right hand side you will see some signatures carved in the upper pew. About 90 years ago Miss E.Virtue and her accomplice Master C. Mull did it–Read–If You Squint Really Hard Can you see a Yeti?

Muriel Simpson who lived on Campbell Street was a faithful parishioner of St. James Anglican Church. If you look at the big cross that hangs in the church, she and her husband Eric donated it. I know because she told me a couple of hundred times.

Muriel made an impact on me, and there is never ever a day that I will not forget her. You see, she made me promise that I would sit in her spot in a certain church pew after she died.  If you were sitting in it when she was alive she made you move. She told me that bad things would happen to me if I didn’t sit on her spot upon her demise. Read more here..The “Margaret Thatcher” of Campbell Street

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Jan 1939, Fri,  Page 23

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

St. James…..

Imagine if All the People…. Photos of Father David Andrew’s Retirement Party

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

Father David Andrew – Just Call Me Father D!

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Memories of The Old Church Halls

 

Local Churches…

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

The Church that Died

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

 

 

 

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Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

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Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

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Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

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Did You Know They Moved St. Paul’s Cemetery?

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1979

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photo-– Scott Reid– 175th Anniversary of St. Paul’s

Reverend Michael Harris travelled afar setting up local parishes as early as 1819 in Lanark County, and St. Paul’s Anglican Church was one of them. Set in the midst of the original cemetery overlooking the Perth Highway, the church partially built in 1852 celebrated its 175th anniversary this year.

The mission of Lanark dates from 1819 when the Rev. Michael Harris began ministering to the people in the community. St. Paul’s was built in 1842 on land donated by Mr. James H. Manahan. A new parsonage was built by 1899 and renovated in 1906 at which time the church was enlarged.  It missed being damaged by the Lanark Village fire  in 1959 but was considerably damaged by fire in 1945 and while repairs were being made, services were held in the Congregational Church. The parsonage was sold around 1990. 

It hasn’t changed much except for the small hall to the right that was built in 1964, but the belfry, porch, tower, sanctuary and vestry were added on in 1906. It thankfully escaped the Lanark fire of 1959 but it suffered fire damage to the roof and interior in 1945.

Their first organ was an old pump organ and then the United Church gave thenm mone that was powered by a hand pump. In 1953 someone willed the church their home and the contents and after the house was sold it bought Sr. Paul’s a new pulpit.

The cemetery in the churchyard was closed in 1917 and a new burial ground was obtained. St. Paul’s Church celebrated its centenary on June 28, 1942. The dead were buried strictly in the churchyards in those days, but back in 1917 local health officials requested that the original old cemetery built on the hill next to the church be closed and moved two miles out of town.  People worried about risks to public health and they came not only from the dank odours of the churchyards, but from the very water the people drank. In many cases, the springs for the drinking supply tracked right through the graveyards of the original churchyards.

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Did you know suicides, if they were buried in consecrated ground at all, were usually deposited in the north end, although their corpses were not allowed to pass through the cemetery gates to enter. They had to be passed over the top of the stone wall or fence. In the case of St. James in Carleton Place they were buried outside the fence.

They once tried to ban the use of coffins altogether for health reasons, insisting that ‘all people should be buried in sacks’ for sanitary purposes. The Victorians recognized the dangers of lead coffins, and made it mandatory that pine be used as an alternative as it ‘decays rapidly,’ thus allowing the corpse to return to the earth more naturally.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Jan 1945, Tue,  Page 16

Other Churches

May be an image of outdoors

May be an image of outdoors

Sacred Heart of Jesus Church under construction about 1890’s, Lanark Village.
Drovers who transported the limestone for the above church from the W. C. Stead quarry.
Ken Potter

Where was the S.C. Stead quarry?
Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International

Great photos…where was the quarry? It was believed that at the end of Paul Drive, west of what used to be Playfair’s Planing Mill there was a quarry. We always called it that as kids anyway.
Ken Potter

Blair T. Paul, Artist – Canadian and International Interesting. I live at 121 Paul dr at the end of the road. It is possible that it was quarried out of the side of the steep hill next to what is now Centennial Truss. I know that is lots of limestone on my property.
Doris Quinn

My late husbands ancestors helped build this Church. Bringing the stones etc. At the time they questioned themselves thinking that soon their Church in Ferguson’s Falls would be closed and they would all travel over the hills to Lanark. And so it is. Understandable though as Lanark had a bigger population. Sacred Heart Church in Lanark opened in 1903.
My late husband, James Quinn was direct descendant of John Quinn, one of the seven Irish men who came over from Ireland in 1820. So yes I have always loved this type of history and have accumulated a lot over the years. Now to get it into the book I always planned to write. At it a bit each week.🙂

relatedreading

PAKENHAM PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1897– $338.50 on the Cornerstone?

St. Andrew’s Pakenham celebrates 175th anniversary October 9– 2015– Click here–Millstone

For the Love of St. Andrew’s– 130th Anniversary

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Old Churches of Lanark County

Who Really Built the Baptist Church in Carleton Place?

Notes About The First Baptist Church in Perth

Smith’s Falls and District Baptist Church

Memories of The Old Church Halls

Tales From the Methodist Church in Perth

Knox Church– McDonald’s Corners

The Littlest Church in Ferguson Falls

The Beckwith Baptist Church

Old Churches of Lanark County

Before and After — Auld Kirk

Another Example of Local Random Acts of Kindness- Zion Memorial United Church

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

A Sneeze of a Tune from St. Andrew’s Church in Carleton Place

The Old Church in Island Brook That Needs a Home

Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

The Church that Died

St James and St Mary’s Christmas Bazaar 1998 -Who Do You Know?

Old Churches of Lanark County

When The Streets of Carleton Place Ran Thick With the Blood of Terror!

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I have been writing about downtown Carleton Place Bridge Street for months and this is something I really want to do. Come join me in the Domino’s Parking lot- corner Lake Ave and Bridge, Carleton Place at 11 am Saturday September 16 (rain date September 17) for a free walkabout of Bridge Street. It’s history is way more than just stores. This walkabout is FREE BUT I will be carrying a pouch for donations to the Carleton Place Hospital as they have been so good to me. I don’t know if I will ever do another walking tour so come join me on something that has been on my bucket list since I began writing about Bridge Street. It’s always a good time–trust me.

Are You Ready to Visit the Open Doors?

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Let The Church Rise– A Little History of St. James Anglican Church

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Since there has been great discussion about St. James Anglican Church I have decided we should all know a little background about the church. Above photo- St. James Thanksgiving 1884

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The Anglican Church in Carleton Place was served for a few years from Franktown– one of the original rectories by Royal patent. In 1883 it was made the centre of a new mission and Rev. E J Boswell was the first missionary. During his incumbency, the first St. James church was built. There were originally unshapely masses of windows and galleries of the early Canadian order of architecture. The unattractive structure was replaced in 1881/1884 with a seating capacity of 500. The following year the debt was paid off. In 1887 there were 256 families and a bible class with 300 names on the roll. Mr Brice McNeeely Jr. (his father owned the tannery)was the superintendent.

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St Mary’s Catholic Church on the other hand was built in two parts with some of the masses held in Lee’s Hotel in 1884. Half of St. Mary’s was built by the local congregation, with even some of the Protestants helping out. They had 75 families and the church seated 400.

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Elliot Hall was named after Canon Elliot. It was built across the street in 1923 on land originally used by the Canada Lumber Co. Across the street is St. James Park which was once home to the other half of the Canada Lumber Co and the proposed site of the Rosamond Woolen Mill. Carleton Place was once going to host the Rosamond Woolen Mills before the owner had a disagreement with an early village council. Angry, he moved his mill lock stock and barrel to Almonte, where in turn, the Penman Mill owners argued with Almonte’s town council, and they moved to Paris, Ontario.The Canada Lumber Co. was torn down in 1908 and a hydro electric dam was built there. The hydro dam was removed in 1973.

St James Anglican Church presently offers twice-weekly Eucharist services, weekly youth group and Bible studies, several women’s groups, a variety of youth activities, a choir, and an ever-expanding Outreach program to help the less fortunate in other parts of the world. Father David was once at the helm— and, if don’t know who he is by now–you can read about him here.

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Father D just retired last year-photo by Linda Seccaspina

 

Guide to Church Services in 1870 in Carleton Place:

St. James’ (Church of England) – ½ past 10 o’clock a.m. on each alternate Sabbath, and at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. on the other Sabbath.  St. Andrew’s  (Church of Scotland) – 11 o’clock a.m. every Sabbath.  Zion Church (Canada Presbyterian) – ½ 2 o’clock p.m. every Sabbath.  Reform Presbyterian – 11 o’clock a.m., and 3 o’clock p.m., on alternate Sabbaths.  Wesleyan Methodist – ½ past 10 o’clock on alternate Sabbaths, and ½ past 6 o’clock on the other Sabbath.  Baptist – ½ past 2 o’clock every Sabbath.  Roman Catholic – occasionally, of which notice will be given.

Photos- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum and Linda Seccaspina

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 14 Sep 1976, Tue, Page 53

John Edwards This was the first sale of land of “The Clergy Reserve”. It was originally 200 acres of land running from Ramsay 7 to Ramsay 8. It was the historic land allocated to the Church of England by Crown. Whne the Clergy Reserves were abolished in the 1850’s, St. James Anglican Church purchased the land for 100 British pounds. It was and is home to massive white pines which are still the defining element of the CP ‘skyline’ when the sun sets in the West. One only need to look up.

 

 

Related Reading:

Imagine if All the People…. Photos of Father David Andrew’s Retirement Party

Hallelujah and a Haircut —Faces of St. James 1976

What did Rector Elliot from St. James Bring Back from Cacouna?

The Emotional Crowded Houses– St. James

Father David Andrew – Just Call Me Father D!

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

One of my favourite songs

This home was once located at the south east corner of Edmund and William Streets, and faced Edmund. At the time the photo was taken it was the home of George Warren. After being converted to a duplex, later families to live here included the Bakers, Drummonds, Taylors, and Lays.
Next door was the big Baden woodshop and second hand furniture shop. Prior to that, the big building housed Charles Whicher’s sign painting business.
St. James Anglican Parish Hall is now on this site.
Karen Robertson
George Warren was an uncle to my mom Isobel Warren. He use to have the license place at his house (not this house). I remember it was when everyone had to get their license on the same day not like today when it is on your birthday. My mom use to help him on that day.