Tag Archives: anchor

Slice it Chop it and Put it on Some Greens

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Photos by Sandra Hurdis Finigan— Bill Flint and Zach Finigan

 

Fictional story–and the people are innocent–trust me innocent by Linda Seccaspina

It was a sunny morning at the Flint homestead in Carleton Place as Grandpa Bill Flint and Zach were beginning their pre-shot routine. Zach was visualizing his upcoming shot, when a voice came over the family home speaker system.
“WOULD THE GENTLEMEN ON THE WOMAN’S TEE BACK UP TO THE MEN’S TEE PLEASE?”

The two were still deep in their golf thoughts, seemingly impervious to the interruption. Again the announcement rang out even louder, and it was Grandma Carole and she meant business:

“Would the Gentlemen on the WOMEN’S tee kindly back up to the men’s tee.”

They both ignored the request and kept concentrating on making those holes, when once more, the same request was heard. This time they both stopped, turned, looked to the window  and directly at the person with the request and shouted back:

“Would the person in the clubhouse kindly stop shouting and let us play our second shot?”

 

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Photos by Sandra Hurdis Finigan— Carole Flint and Zach

Zach was a smooth operator at Flint Golf Club’s and soon attached himself to the prettiest lady golfer in the area, even if she was a source of irritation sometimes, and began boasting to her.

“You know,” said Zach, “the other member in this golf club is afraid to play me.  I think he is afraid I will bring out my secret weapon.”

 

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Photos by Sandra Hurdis Finigan—  Zach Finigan

Deciding to use the family anchor to play his next shot (The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint) he defied odds of 67 million-to-one to score two holes-in-one in the same round. He knew that he just did his best and not to worry about club presidents on loudspeakers and other golf things as his Grandfather Bill always said:

“Never worry about the game as they just named the game golf as all the other 4 letter words were taken”.

 

 

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historicalnotes

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Lunch time at the Perth Golf Course!! Photo by-Perth Remembered

 

WW2 Golf History

German aircraft from Norway would fly on missions to northern England; because of the icy weather conditions, the barrels of their guns had a small dab of wax to protect them. As they crossed the coast, they would clear their guns by firing a few rounds at the golf courses. Golfers were urged to take cover.

 

* Temporary Rules 1940 *

1. Players are asked to collect bombs and shrapnel to save causing damage to the mowing machines

2. In competitions, during gunfire players may take cover without incurring a penalty for ceasing playing.

3. The positions of known delayed action bombs are marked with red flags.

4. Shrapnel may be moved on the fairway, or in the bunkers, without penalty.

5. A ball moved or destroyed by enemy action, can be replaced without penalty provided it’s not nearer the hole.

6. A player whose stroke is affected by a bomb exploding may play another ball from the same place. Penalty one stroke. [A little harsh?]

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading

 

Was Maurice Cornell the Greatest Golfer in Carleton Place?

The Hidden Gem in the Scottish Glen by Ted MacDonald

The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

Gluten Free Corn Dogs and the Old Carleton Place Alligator Hole –Chef Ben White

 

 

 

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The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

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The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor

Sept 6 1968— Almonte Gazette

A relic of the Mississippi river’s interesting past was reclaimed from the waters recently by Kathy and Keith Dack. The two were diving in the river opposite the former Hawthorne Woollen Mills, now Leigh Instruments, when this discovered a ship’s anchor, well over three feet in length and of tremendous weight.
Does anyone know anything about this?

 

(with files from the Almonte GazetteAlmonte Gazette)

I found the article right under my nose.. of course, when I was not looking for it..:)

A relic of the Mississippi River was reclaimed from the Mississippi River by Kathy and the late Keith Dack in September of 1968. The two were diving opposite the Hawthorne Knitting Mills, then Leigh Instruments, when they found the ship’s anchor. This area is around the same area that Carleton Place’s once *floating bridge was located.

Using diving apparatus they were diving in about 7 feet of murky water when they found the ship’s anchor embedded on the bottom of the river. Attaching a rope to the anchor and using power they dragged the object to shore and found out they had found an “ancient” anchor over three feet in length and two feet in width. Some of the original chain was well worn and the Dack’s wondered how what was left of the chain supported the anchor that was of great weight.

According to the article the anchor was left against a tree on the property of Kathy’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Dack. The late Keith Dack was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ken Dack. It was said that the age of the anchor could go  back as long as 80 years or so when it was used in the “good old days” when steamers operated on  the Mississippi River pulling log booms and operating picnic excursions. The last steamer on the lakes  was apparently still tied up at the dock at the foot of Frank street in 1968.

A look into the Canadian’s files reveals that if the anchor belonged to an excursion steamer it could have been the Enterprise, which must have been a sizeable boat. This description of the anchor should give some indication of the size of boats which once plied the Mississippi from Carleton Place to the docks near Innisville. Steamers were quite common on the lakes,  constant excursions being run to the old four- storey Queen’s Royal Hotel with its long tiers of surrounding verandahs before it was destroyed by fire.

 

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Photo–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum—This is a picture of the Queens Royal Hotel, built by Peter Prosser Salter in 1899 and was part of the Lake Park Resort just outside of Carleton Place.These Carleton Place citizens of the 1890’s are lined up on the Lake Park dock waiting to board the steamship “Carleton”. It ran regular trips between Lake Park Lodge on Mississippi Lake and the town docks located near the Hawthorne Mill at the end of Charles Street. 

The summer resort record of Lake Park, central site of  the early Canadian Canoe Club Association and Northern Division regattas goes back over 100 years. In its days Allan’s Point, and for many years later, was a favourite location for the aquatic outings and sport days of Carleton Place social organizations. It’s first small two- storey summer hotel was built in 1887. The Lake Park Company of Carleton Place Ltd. completed most of the existing lot and street subdivision of the community in 1893. To serve it with transportation the company built the Carleton ­ which was the lake ’s largest steamboat, an 80- foot double decked paddle wheeler.

So, therefore it may be concluded the anchor could have belonged to any of these boats, which once plied the lakes. Files also indicate there was also the 40 ft steamer the Lillian that once docked at the Lake Park Wharf.

Memories of what once was.

 

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Lake Park Lodge dock that greeted many visitors at one time- Photo of Dock and Lake Park by Linda Seccaspina

 

 

 

historicalnotes

So was it from the tugboat that used to frequent the Nichols lumberyard where Centennial Park now is– or the steamers that went up and down the Mississippi River?

 

1,500 people attended the C.P.R. employees’ picnic at Lake Park on Wednesday of last week, and enjoyed the thirty-eight events that made up the program . The baby competition resulted as follow s: 1, Leo Hockenhull, 11 months o ld ; 2, H . McDiarmid, 4 months; 3, George Dummert, 10 months’; 4, Roy McRostie, 4 months. Sept 1 1899

*Dack History-

Losing an Institution- Dacks Jewellers

The Story Behind the Clock – Dack’s Jewellers

 

*Floating Bridge–Thelma Hurdis said as a child when they were swimming they found shaped block/rocks that went across the river and Lloyd Hughes has documented the bridge in his papers on Bridge Street. Read-The Floating Bridge of Carleton Place — Found!

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Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo 1902

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal31 Aug 1899, ThuPage 8

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal10 Aug 1899, ThuPage 2

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal04 Aug 1897, WedPage 7

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal30 Jun 1893, FriPage 7

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

Facts You Might Not Know About Carleton Place for our 150th Birthday – Part 5

The Steamboat Picnics on Pretty Island

Don’t Be Scared Ladies –Steamers on the Mississippi

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

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The Anchor on Lake Ave East????  Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

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If you drive down near the end of Lake Avenue East you might spot an anchor stuck in the ground in front of  Bill and Carole Flint’s home. Not everyone has an anchor in their front yard so I had to get the story and Mike Flint was kind enough to share it with me.

 

I was returning from a dive during the summer of 1987 under the Highway 7 Bridge. On my way back to the boat launch at the west end of Lake Avenue, I came across one of the ends that was sticking out of the mud. Only 6 inches of the anchor was showing, but I recognized what it was.

 

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Out of excitement, I shot to the surface of the water and yelled for my father to come and see.

We marked the spot, and came back with a tractor to retrieve it from the lake.

 

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We partially floated it underneath the boat and dragged it in until the tractor could reach it.

There were markings on the anchor, but not legible to put together any kind of story of where the anchor was made.

Thanks Mike Flint for telling us this story!!!

 

Steven Flint– I remember scuba diving. I was in the boat when we found it on the Mississippi. We filled 45 gallon drums with water, sunk them then used the scuba tanks underwater to fill them with air. Then pried and the air drums lifted the anchor to the surface. Hauled it into the boat and it’s been at home there ever since.

 

historicalnotes

So was it from the tugboat that used to frequent the Nichols lumberyard where Centennial Park now is– or the steamers that went up and down the Mississippi River?

Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum thinks it could be from one of the steam ships or from a lumber raft.

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Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

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Sept 6 1968— Almonte Gazette

A relic of the Mississippi river’s interesting past was reclaimed from the waters recently by Kathy and Keith Dack. The two were diving in the river opposite the former Hawthorne Woollen Mills, now Leigh Instruments, when this discovered a ship’s anchor, well over three feet in length and of tremendous weight.
Does anyone know anything about this?

 

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Is this the one Jennifer Fenwick Irwin has at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum? If you know– please let Jennifer Fenwick Irwin know

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

The Whistle Stop at the end of Lake Ave East

The Tale of the Mysterious Lake Ave East Cat

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Shadow People of Lake Ave East

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

Is That the Face of a Great Dane in a Lake Ave East Tree?

And Away She Goes on Lake Avenue East