Tag Archives: Almonte Hotel

Gemmill Stories and Geneaology

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Gemmill Stories and Geneaology

Dr. Ernest Welland Gemmill

February 1945

Medical practitioner in Toronto, Dr. Ernest Welland Gemmill, died Saturday, February 10th at the home of his son, Rev. Claude D. Gemmill, aged 79 years. The late Dr. Gemmill was born in Horton Township, near Renfrew, a son of the late John Gemmill and his wife, Ann Jane Coulter. When he was an infant the family moved to Clayton where they resided for eleven years and thence to Almonte. Following his graduation from McGill University he practised in Almonte for a short time, coming to Pakenham in 1890, where he practised for 29 years. He then went to Toronto where he carried on in the east end for 25 years until he became ill last August. In his younger years he was an enthusiastic curler and cricketer. He was a devout member of St. Mark’s Anglican Church where he took an active part in all organizations. Surviving are his widow, the former Miss Edfta Gibson of 299 Kingswood Rd“ two sons, Rev. Claude Gemmill and John Gemmill, one daughter, Betty Gemmill, all of Toronto. Of a family of six, he is survived by two brothers, Rev. Wm. Gemmill of Victoria and Edwin M. Gemmill ofj Lindsay, Ont., one sister, Miss Catherine Gemmill ofV ictoria, B. V. Oni son Ted, died in the last Great War. Mr. Wm. Banning of Almonte is cousin. Interment was made at Toronto.

Name
Ernest Welland Gammill
Gender
Male
Age
79
Birth Date
19 Jun 1866
Birth Place
Renfrew Ontario
Death Date
10 Feb 1945
Death Place
Toronto, York, Ontario, Canada
Father
John Gemmill
Mother
Anne Jane Gemmill
Spouse
Edna Gibson
Certificate Number
013055

Stories

John Gemmill and his wife, Ann Jane Coulter purchased a hotel in Clayton from James CoulterJr. in 1869. In addition to the hotel he had the contract to run the mail from Almonte to Clayton daily which included a stage business where riders paid 50 cents each. In 1876 John took over the Almonte Hotel and sold the Clayton hotel to John McLaren. He also bought the Davis House in Almonte. from Whispers from the Past, History and Tales of Clayton” sold out the first printing of 200 copies during the first week. Today I picked up the second printing, so we are back in business! If you want to purchase a book please email me at rose@sarsfield.ca or call me at 613-621-9300, or go to the Clayton Store, or Mill Street Books in Almonte.

The following letter is from our old friend, Mr. Dugald Campbell of Vancouver. Readers of the Gazette are always pleased to see an article by him and this time he sent several. The journalistic spirit must have moved him after a long silence:

 Vancouver, B. C. Nov. 27th; 1958. Editor Gazette: 

Much interested in the photo of the late Lt.-Col. J. D. Gemmill. He was gone out of the district when I was a lad but we always remembered the fine picnics we were able to hold, several of them each summer, in Gemmill’s Grove. 

One of the fine interesting characters of Almonte in my day was John Gemmill, who was my host of the old Davis House. Not only was he a good hotelman, he kept the place in excellent order, and it was the home of many of the valley travellers who used the local railway during their work.

The eldest son became an Anglican clergyman and went out to Japan, and later on his sister went out there with him. This couple experienced the terrible time of the great uprising and typhoon of Tokyo, and they lost everything. They came back to Canada and  for a time lived in Victoria, B. C. Charlie Gemmill was a druggist, learning the business with P. C. Dowdall, and he was the chef of the Davis House and later when the Davis House changed hands, after the demise of their father, Herb went up Toronto way and carried on his calling in fine form. 

Perhaps the most interesting of the Gemmill lads was big Ed. He became a husky lad early in life, and he did the driving to the CPR station to pick up the travellers’ grips. Ed. has gone these past few years, but I had several most interesting visits where he was in charge of the Empress Hotel there. The first time I went there I camouflaged my name a little, and he gave me a fine room but Mien he found out who I was, well we stayed up more than half the night chin-wagging about old times in Almonte.

Ed. Gemmill told me yarns about my home town which I had never heard in my youth there, yarns that could only come from night-clerking at the old Davis House. John Gemmill, the owner of the Davis House, was a fine horse fancier, and at the local NLAS fair and there was great competition between Gemmill and A. C. Wylie, and a little later, with your famous Dr. Archie Metcalfe.

Gemmill had a pair of smart bays and Alex. Wylie had a pair of fancy chestnuts, and competition around the old oval was really something. When Archie Metcalfe got into the picture, he also had a pair of very smart steppers, and I think, perhaps, the carriage competition in that direction was the outstanding event of the third day of the fair for a number of years. So the Gemmills have come and gone in the great procession, but they were a fine group of folks just the same.

Dugald Campbell.

Letter from Davis House to Scotts in Pakenham- Adin Daigle Collection– Where Was Davis House?

Jeremy Woodchuck of Gemmill Park

The Gemmill Well in Almonte 1951

So What Happened to Miss Winnifred Knight Dunlop Gemmill’s Taxidermy Heads?

Gemmill Park Skating Rink May Be Illegal–1947

Jessie Leach Gemmill -The “Claire Fraser” of Lanark

History of McLaren’s Depot — by Evelyn Gemmill and Elaine DeLisle

Next Time You Drive Down Highway 15–Gemmils

From Gemmil’s Creek to the Riel Rebellion

Orchids in Gemmils Swamp June 1901

More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon

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More Almonte Hotel History — Michael Dixon
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Jul 1935, Mon  •  Page 3

Michael Dixon, well-known Ottawa Valley hotelman, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Kennedy, Ramsay, Sunday evening. Born at Eganville 86 years ago, a son of the late Michael R. Dixon, he served his time as a blacksmith at Glen Tay, Ont., later serving in the same capacity with the Ackland Carriage Work, Almonte.

A few years later he took over the butcher business now owned by M. J . McCabe. In 1890, he bought the old Almonte Hotel, which he operated for 14 years. He later operated the Windsor Hotel. Mr. Dixon was married 64 years ago to Miss Bridget Conlon, a daughter of the late Jas. Conlon of Glen Tay. Mrs. Dixon died 11 years ago. 

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Edward Kennedy and four sons, Joseph M. Dixon of Stewartville, Minn.; Dr, J . A. and F. L. Dixon of Sudbury and A, B. Dixon of Windsor. Long identified with the commercial life of the Ottawa Valley, his passing, will be noted with regret by many citizens. 

The funeral was held at St. Mary’s church and cemetery on Tuesday morning. Requiem Mass being chanted by Rev. Geo. W. O’Toole, P.P. The pallbearers were: Dr. Bert Dixon, and Frank Dixon of Sudbury; P. J . Carroll, J. J. Hourigan, Michael Ryan and Robert Little. 

Among the relatives attending the funeral from a distance were: E. P. Furlong, Miss Annie Furlong, Miss Edna Furlong, Mrs. John Noonan, Mr. Jack Cooper, W illiam McCabe, Michael Conlon, Mr. and Mrs. Willard Conlon, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Conlon, Mrs. Fred’Q uarterm aine, Mrs. Thomas Leonard, Mrs. Fred Ferguson Mrs D an Lee, all of Perth; Mr. Frank Letang, Sr., Miss Gertrude Letang, Mr. and Mrs. Herb Letang of Renfrew; Rev. J. R. O’Gorman of Tim ­ mins; Mrs. Frank Dixon of Sudbury; Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Kennedy of Nepean, and John Walsh of Carleton Place

He had 4 children that left this world very early.

Family Members

Spouse

Children

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1943, Thu  •  Page 1
gail Barr photo–

read

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

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I don‘t sell on Ebay NOR do I promote others BUT when I see something that should be in a museum I make people aware of it. Anyways the watch is sold… but the story still needs to be told

I got an email yesterday that said:

After reading Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

“The gold Eterna Challenger watch purchased by the Almonte Hotel staff for presentation to A.H. Whitten in 1948 is currently up for sale on eBay (July 8, 2020). The ‘tank’ (rectangular) style watch by Eterna (a Swiss firm) has a ivory colored dial with a small second hand at the ‘6 position’, a gold case, and a brown leather band. It is engraved on the back-“A. H. Whitten–From the Staff Hotel Almonte1948”

Sure enough here it is:
The back of the case has the following engraving: A. H. Whitten From The Staff Hotel Almonte 1948, 10kt Gold Filled Apex

A. H. Whitton was the Mayor of Almonte

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Nov 1959, Fri  •  Page 2
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Aug 1960, Tue  •  Page 12
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Aug 1960, Tue  •  Page 7

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history


Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

gail Barr photo–

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

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The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

 

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1970s photos from the old Canadian and Almonte Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

I found this article in one of the old Amonte Gazette’s of Lucy Poaps and I believe it was from the 1990s.  Brent Eades and Toronto restaurateur Wolf Savcioglu were in the final stages of buying the Almonte Hotel from the then current owner Hap Peattie.

They hoped renovations would begin soon and an architect was drawing up the plans and estimates would be in the 100s of thousands. They wanted to preserve the old hotel such as interior woodworking and exterior clapboard. The hotel dates back to the 1800s but no one is really sure. Researchers figure the hotel which was originally called The David House Hotel was probably built in the 1870s.

A map from 1889 shows the structure with stables and driving sheds behind it on High Street back to the brick house around the corner. Carriages appear to have entered from Bridge Street between the hotel and a two-storey storage house which was connected by a second floor walkway. The storage house is in the same location as the present retail store but it is not known if it is the same building. 

Brent’s uncle, George Eades, owned a shoe store on Mill Street years ago and later moved to Carleton Place moved to Carleton Place to open Eades Home Hardware store which was located on Bridge Street.

 

Almonte Hotels

Almonte House

Hotels were built along Mill Street to serve the anticipated traffic from the new mills and railway. John Murphy’s hotel at the current site of 34, 36 and 38 Mill Street, later the North American Hotel, was destroyed by fire in 1877. After Shipman’s death in 1852, his daughter Catherine added a three-storey hotel to the north side of her father’s house (95 Mill Street) for a railway hotel known as “Almonte House”.

 

Stafford’s Hotel

When Stafford’s Hotel was destroyed in an 1877 fire, it was replaced by three, three-storey brick buildings, which were later also destroyed in a 1909 fire.

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Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Nov 1935, Sat  •  Page 18

 

Shipman House

Even the former Shipman house and hotel became a pool hall and tailor shop, with the rear addition converted to the Alma Apartments, managed by Alma Rooney.

 

Info

The 1889-1902 fire insurance plan for Almonte shows: Rosamond Mill on Coleman Island; a series of woollen mills, knitting mills and foundries along the river side of Mill street; the Post Office and Almonte House Hotel in the triangle of Bridge, Mill and Little Bridge; and the south side of Mill Street lined with wooden and brick storefronts

The Crown regranted the land to Daniel Shipman, who with several other settlers quickly developed the grist and sawmills, and in the next few years a blacksmith’s shop, school, hotel, distillery and other ventures. he first European settler here was a David Shepherd, who in 1819 obtained a Crown grant of land in the area of present-day Almonte, where he began.

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jan 1943, Thu  •  Page 1

 

Temperance in Almonte

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Dec 1913, Sat  •  Page 13

 

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

The Fight for Senior Housing in 1982 – Almonte History

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Susie’s Kitchen Band– Names Names Names

He Said-and– He Said! Oh Let the Song of Words Play!

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

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Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

 

Susan Elliott Topping My Grandfather worked there in the evenings after his job at the Gazette office.

Judy Reid Hamre Our high school “Philosophy Club” ran afternoon meetings out of there in our graduating years. The philosophy?
“Can’t dance, might as well drink beer”
Or something like that.

Patti Larose The woodshed lounge. Lol. …where ladies needed an escort and could only sit on one side of the hotel (bar)–the staff. ,Alli,Niper,and Lizard and Marty

Linda Nilson-Rogers At one time there was a sign saying ladies and escorts over the door. Mixed drinks could be had there. The poolroom area was licensed only for beer.

Dawn Jones Linda Nilson-Rogers if I remember correctly we were all there one night with Keith, Donnie and Cindy and Randy(my husband) and myself. I think I was only ever in there less than a handful of times. I did have the occasion of calling the hotel though..searching for an uncle or two who was late home.

Allan StanleyAsk Marg McNeely for a story

Margaret McNeelyWell here’s my story…..worked there as a waitress in the dining room when i was 15…ppl that ate there were usually only overnighters and passing thru. I remember an American family of five left me a $5 tip…boy thought I had struck gold!

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Karen Hirst Story goes that first night in town for Kerry family, year 1954, we had our supper in the dining lounge of the Almonte Hotel.

Rosalyn Wing At one time Mr. Whitten owned it and One side was men only.

 

Stuart McIntosh Same as Notty Lee’s in Smiths Falls

 

Don Raycroft Magically, the beer was always the optimal temperature for drinking !!

 

Don Raycroft No matter how long it was between visits Ali always knew what you drank !!

 

Don Raycroft Mary Edmonds ran the kitchen at one point. Her food was homemade and really good. Best hot hamburgers anywhere

 

Carol McDonald Don Raycroft Mary did make great meals for sure!

 

Darlene MacDonald Don Raycroft Carolyn Elliott also worked in the kitchen. Food was home made and delicious

 

Mary Anne Harrison One night we left The Almonte and headed for CP to The Queens. A cousin of mine, who shall remain nameless, pumped about 20 bucks into the jukebox before we left. Moon River would have serenaded the customers the rest of that night and most of the next day before the money ran out. We laughed ourselves silly over that.

 

Paul Latour LOL … too funny!!. … 😀

 

Susan Elliott Topping Only hotel I ever got kicked out of-(underage) LOL.

 

Don Raycroft Susan Elliott Topping I guess we are now wondering how many you got kicked out of once you became of age !!😊

 

Susan Elliott Topping Don Raycroft None! Now I don’t even drink. Lol

 

Steven Currie If Ali saw u pulling up outside, he would have a cold pint waiting for u before u got through the door, great fellow

 

Don Raycroft Steven Currie There is nothing that says “home” more than that.

 

Linda Mills TANG & Chuckwagons 🤢

 

Sandra Houston- Linda Mills chuck wagons were the best….

 

D Christopher Vaughan Sandra Houston Scott Davey and I each bought a case of chuckwagons from the guy who stocked the freezer one Friday afternoon.

 

Don Raycroft Linda Mills the chuckwagons were probably the most unhealthiest thing on the planet. But they were sooo good. I must try and recreate them for my grandsons. I’ll just tell my daughters it’s a history lesson !! 😊

 

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photo-Lisa Stanley Sheehan–My two lovely aunts, Anita and Mary Murray, in front of the Almonte Hotel

 

June 16 1960–Almonte Hotel

It was announced on Thursday of last week that Mr. Fred Hayward, one of the partners at Hotel Almonte had sold his interest in the business to Mr. F. J. Nagle of Toronto, his associate since the property was sold by Mr. A. H. Whitten in 1955. It was a case where both partners felt that one man ownership would be more efficient. After negotiations over a period of time during which both offered to buy the other out, Mr. Hayward agreed to take Mr. Nagle’s bid and after July 1st he will be the sole owner of the hotel.

 

He is a native of Toronto and has been a partner since 1955. For 25 years he was in the service of O’Keefe’s Brewing Co. Ltd. For a long time he was one of the sales representatives of that concern travelling in Western Ontario and other parts of the province. “Fred” as he is known to his close friends is a family man, his wife and seven children residing in Toronto. During his time as a partner in the local business the interior of the hotel was greatly improved, the men’s beverage room was brought up to date with new flooring, soundproof ceiling and many other new appointments that were long overdue. Mr. Hayward has a nice personality and made many friends during his five years as a citizen of the town. His partner, Mr. Nagle, who has come here periodically over the last five years has an upholstering plant in Toronto. It is probable that he will appoint a manager to operate the business here as he cannot be absent from.

 

Susan Elliott Topping You can buy them at Giant Tiger! (In SF’s anyway)

 

Steven Currie They are in a cage with Round Up in Canadian Tire

 

Allison Vaughan used to walk from school there on Fridays for French fries

 

Tracy Giles-Thompson –Allison Vaughan Best homemade fries and gravy!

 

Christine Mitchell So, I remember when I was very young, maybe 9 or 10, my dad was staying in a room upstairs temporarily. This would have been mid eighties. He came and went out the back fire escape. Somehow, the bolts holding the fire escape to the building came loose, and the stairs fell when my dad was on them. He jumped hoping to get less hurt, ended up breaking his foot very badly. Was in the hospital for a while, in a cast for an even longer while. He walked with a limp after that until he passed. Ali Dixon would know about this.

 

Sandra Houston— Christine Mitchell I remember that…friggin scary

Brenda Voyce Christine Mitchell I remember that.. the old fire escape ladder I bet had not been checked for years.

Christine Mitchell There were many Friday and Saturday nights myself or my brother would call there looking for dad to see when to get supper started, or to ask him for money. Lol. Then we’d show up, stick our heads around the doorway and wait for someone to call Mitch so we could get our $10 or whatever it was we asked for. It always seemed that everyone there knew everyone and it was always a big party.

 

Shelagh Kelly-LaFloor Is the building still around and where is it?

Linda Nilson-Rogers Shelagh Kelly-LaFloor it is now the home of Rebound..reunited across from Circle K

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Sara Alexandra– My dad’s old jacket is from the Almonte Hotel

 

 

historicalnotes

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jun 1951, Wed  •  Page 14

 

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jul 1965, Tue  •  Page 8

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

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The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

 

I have been asked for information about the Almonte Hotel on Bridge Street in Almonte so I am piecing some clippings here.. add comments any comments you remember.. and then put it all together as a community project. Thanks!!

What we know:

Daniel Shipman and Prudence Boyce had 15 children, most of whom lived and 

worked in Almonte, Sarah, Eliza 1812, Stephen Boyce 1814-1852, Sylvanus 

Keeler 1817, Millicent Boyce 1819-1854, Daniel Harvey 1821, Catherine 

1823-1897, Norman 1826-1863, Debora 1827, Samuel McLean 1828-1875, Rachel 

Alvina 1831-1901, Olive 1833, Unknown son 1834, Jehoida Boyce 1836 and Birdie 

  1. Sylvanus Keeler Shipman, my great great grandfather, ran  the saw mill, 

the lumber yard and a distillery in Almonte. He and his father Daniel were 

also principal shareholders in the Ramsay Woollen Cloth Manufacturing 

Company.  Norman Shipman ran the flour mill and was constable of Almonte in 

  1. Catherine Shipman, who was married to Henry Ryan Rose, turned the 

family home 79 Bridge Street  into the Almonte Hotel.Catherine Shipman married Henry Ryan Rose whose ancestors were Loyalists (UEL) from New York. Jehoida Boyce Shipman managed the Almonte 

Hotel and worked in the grist mill and the flour mill before moving to St. 

Joseph’s Island, Algoma, where he had a farm and a saw mill. Samuel McLean 

Shipman was a farmer in Almonte. Stephen Boyce Shipman was a merchant in 

Kingston and married the grandaughter of Benedict Arnold, Charlotte Montague 

Arnold. Bytown.net

Photo-Paul Latour-Almonte Hotel
It has been my practice since I was 16 (and part of my career) to always have a camera with me wherever I go, especially before they squeezed cameras into portable telephones everyone has these days.

thumbnail-55 (1)

I am both a history/photography buff and I love the history that surrounds us here. I happen to have in my files a small number of Almonte street photos that might be of interest to those on The Tales of Almonte page that tell something of the Almonte of old, even some recent ones. I’d be happy to share with you and all if you would like.

For starters, attached is a photo of the old Almonte Hotel in nothing more than its scivies. Back in April/May of 1999, the hotel had been renovated from top to bottom. The old siding that had covered the building for Lord knows how many years had been completely removed and thus exposed what I would presume to be the original wooden structure.

It had remained like that for only a few days before the new siding was put on, once again hiding it’s original beauty.  Note, as well, both the “Hotel Almonte” painted sign along the top wall and the classic “Almonte Hotel” sign which was taken down during the reno work.

I felt compelled to visually document the old building as it used to be while I had the chance to do so before it got all covered up again. I did so with tripod and camera on the night of April 30, 1999. A full moon was a welcome photo bomb to boot.

If my memory serves me right, the work to cover the old hotel up with newer siding had begun just two days after I took the photo. I’m glad I got the shot before the building was re-covered.

Unfortunately, I have no historical information about the old hotel as to when it was built, how long it had remained as a hotel, stories of what might have gone on there over the years, what it became after the hotel closed, etc.

Paul Latour

Thank you Paul– we love sharing, so PM me or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com with your photos or stories.
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1913, Sat  •  Page 20
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Jul 1927, Sat  •  Page 2
img - 2020-02-23T145350.061
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Mar 1988, Wed  •  Page 7
historicalnotes
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jun 1951, Wed  •  Page 8
13876576_10154156423746886_8253718635085609575_n1 (1).jpg
1970s photos from the old Canadian and Almonte Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.
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he Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Jun 1939, Thu  •  Page 12
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Mar 1914, Tue  •  Page 1

 

 

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Aug 1940, Sat  •  Page 6

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 May 1905, Thu  •  Page 11

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 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Mar 1985, Thu  •  Page 4

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Jul 1968, Sat  •  Page 3

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

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Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

 

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Photo-Paul Latour-Almonte Hotel
It has been my practice since I was 16 (and part of my career) to always have a camera with me wherever I go, especially before they squeezed cameras into portable telephones everyone has these days.

I am both a history/photography buff and I love the history that surrounds us here. I happen to have in my files a small number of Almonte street photos that might be of interest to those on The Tales of Almonte page that tell something of the Almonte of old, even some recent ones. I’d be happy to share with you and all if you would like.

For starters, attached is a photo of the old Almonte Hotel in nothing more than its scivies. Back in April/May of 1999, the hotel had been renovated from top to bottom. The old siding that had covered the building for Lord knows how many years had been completely removed and thus exposed what I would presume to be the original wooden structure.

It had remained like that for only a few days before the new siding was put on, once again hiding it’s original beauty.  Note, as well, both the “Hotel Almonte” painted sign along the top wall and the classic “Almonte Hotel” sign which was taken down during the reno work.

I felt compelled to visually document the old building as it used to be while I had the chance to do so before it got all covered up again. I did so with tripod and camera on the night of April 30, 1999. A full moon was a welcome photo bomb to boot.

If my memory serves me right, the work to cover the old hotel up with newer siding had begun just two days after I took the photo. I’m glad I got the shot before the building was re-covered.

Unfortunately, I have no historical information about the old hotel as to when it was built, how long it had remained as a hotel, stories of what might have gone on there over the years, what it became after the hotel closed, etc.

Paul Latour

Thank you Paul– we love sharing, so PM me or email me at sav_77@yahoo.com with your photos or stories.
historicalnotes
13876576_10154156423746886_8253718635085609575_n1 (1).jpg
1970s photos from the old Canadian and Almonte Gazette files from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.