Tag Archives: abner nichols

This Week’s Updates to Stories

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This Week’s Updates to Stories

 

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Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

 

Hi Linda,

Thank you so much for posting the information about the Abner Nichols and Family. Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

I am thrilled with what you have found so quickly and I know my Dad will be too!

The story about the boat not starting and trying all day… my Dad had actually told me about that and laughs when he tells it.

My quest for information is off to a great start!

Sincerely,

Mandy

Have you read the boat story? An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

 

 

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Riddell— H B Montgomery House History For Sale

Everyone will be happy to know the doors are sold, and although I can’t tell you who bought them until after Christmas, as they are a gift, you will be pleased to know they went to the perfect home and family.  I could not have picked better folks and they will be loved.–Riddell— H B Montgomery House History For Sale

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

More About Bridge Street from Petra Graber– AND –UPDATES UPDATES

221 Facebook Shares!! Memories of Almonte update– Don Andrews and Mrs. Scholar

Searching for Elizabeth Cram–Updates on Andrew Waugh

Update on the Time Capsule in Springside Hall

NO Questions Asked? The Ballygiblin Sign Update

Update on Miss Powell from CPHS- John Edwards

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

 

 

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

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Looking for Information– Nichols Family History

 

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Photo from the John Armour photo collection

John Armour–This is a picture of Abner Nichols, (very early 1900’s) from my late Grandfather Walter Armour’s collection. Abner Nichols married Eliza McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation James McNeely). My Great Grandfather, Robert Armour married Jessie McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation McNeely, Thomas Moore)

 

 

Hi Linda,

I was on line and reading some of your stories about early life in Carleton Place.. really enjoyed them and found them very interesting. I have connections to Carleton Place as follows:
My Great Great Grandfather was Abner Nichols – 1836-1905
My Great Grandfather William Abner 1870-1933
My Grandmother Eliza May Nichols 1895-1932 who was my fathers mother ( she married George Albert Clark 1878-1949)
My father son of Eliza and George – George Clark is 91  now he has a lot of stories about Carleton Place and a great memory. I took him to the Carleton Place Museum and he was very pleased to see the exhibit about the Nichols Lumber Mill. He spent a lot of time in Carleton Place as a young boy and would take the train from Ottawa.
My Name is Mandy Clark.
The reason for this email is that I am working on the Nichols family history but have run into trouble going back any farther than Anber Nichols. I do not seem to be able to find any record of his (Abner’s)  parents and was wondering if you knew the information or have ideas about where I can find it.
I am on ancestry.ca but have found nothing.
Thanks for any information you may have,
Sincerely,
Mandy Clark
I told Mandy to contact the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum to see if Jennifer had anything– but do any of you out there in cyber land have any info?
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I found a few things below with the first  newspaper article and it contains quite a bit of information. Abner was actually born in Kemptville to American parents and lived for 10 years of his early life in the United States.
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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  19 Nov 1930, Wed,  Page 7

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Sep 1906, Mon,  Page 4

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Sep 1906, Mon,  Page 4

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Jan 1898, Fri,  Page 7

 

One of the most reliable place to find the names of the parents of an individual is in the marriage record. Insofar as Abner’s marriage was prior to civil registration of marriages in Ontario (1869-present), the place to look is in the church records of the faith in which the marriage was performed.
To determine the likely faith of Abner, I checked his son William’s marriage (in civil registration records) to see what faith he was at the time of his marriage. The result is Church of England which is the Anglican Church… that leaves the potential that Abner was also Anglican.
If that is the case, Abner’s church marriage record will be at the archives of the Anglican Diocese in Ottawa. The archive is at Christ Church Cathedral. They do church register look ups for a small fee that is used to keep the archives public.
It s very likely that, if the marriage was Anglican, that the record will contain the names of Abner’s and his bride’s parents.
The archivist’s name is Glenn Lockwood. You can reach them at: http://www.ottawa.anglican.ca/Archives.html
Hope this helps more than confuses 🙂
Rick Roberts

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

The World of William Abner Nichols

An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

Before and After at Centennial Park

Splinters of Sinders Nichols and Brides

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

 

 

relatedreading

Searching for Information: J.A. Stevenson and Robert and Jane Ross of Lanark

 

 

 

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Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way….
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–

October 28th The Occomores Valley Grante and Tile Event–730pm-1am Carleton Place arena-Stop by and pick up your tickets for our fundraiser dance for LAWS. They also have tickets for Hometown Hearts event at the Grand Hotel fundraiser

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The Anchor on Lake Ave East???? Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

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The Anchor on Lake Ave East????  Land Ahoy!!! Mike Flint

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If you drive down near the end of Lake Avenue East you might spot an anchor stuck in the ground in front of  Bill and Carole Flint’s home. Not everyone has an anchor in their front yard so I had to get the story and Mike Flint was kind enough to share it with me.

 

I was returning from a dive during the summer of 1987 under the Highway 7 Bridge. On my way back to the boat launch at the west end of Lake Avenue, I came across one of the ends that was sticking out of the mud. Only 6 inches of the anchor was showing, but I recognized what it was.

 

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Out of excitement, I shot to the surface of the water and yelled for my father to come and see.

We marked the spot, and came back with a tractor to retrieve it from the lake.

 

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We partially floated it underneath the boat and dragged it in until the tractor could reach it.

There were markings on the anchor, but not legible to put together any kind of story of where the anchor was made.

Thanks Mike Flint for telling us this story!!!

 

Steven Flint– I remember scuba diving. I was in the boat when we found it on the Mississippi. We filled 45 gallon drums with water, sunk them then used the scuba tanks underwater to fill them with air. Then pried and the air drums lifted the anchor to the surface. Hauled it into the boat and it’s been at home there ever since.

 

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So was it from the tugboat that used to frequent the Nichols lumberyard where Centennial Park now is– or the steamers that went up and down the Mississippi River?

Jennifer Fenwick Irwin from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum thinks it could be from one of the steam ships or from a lumber raft.

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Photo- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

 

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Sept 6 1968— Almonte Gazette

A relic of the Mississippi river’s interesting past was reclaimed from the waters recently by Kathy and Keith Dack. The two were diving in the river opposite the former Hawthorne Woollen Mills, now Leigh Instruments, when this discovered a ship’s anchor, well over three feet in length and of tremendous weight.
Does anyone know anything about this?

 

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Is this the one Jennifer Fenwick Irwin has at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Museum? If you know– please let Jennifer Fenwick Irwin know

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

The Whistle Stop at the end of Lake Ave East

The Tale of the Mysterious Lake Ave East Cat

Feeling Groovy by the Lake Ave East Bridge

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Shadow People of Lake Ave East

October 13, 1977 George W. Raeburn of Lake Ave East— Artist and C. P. R. Man

Is That the Face of a Great Dane in a Lake Ave East Tree?

And Away She Goes on Lake Avenue East

An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

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Photo from the John Armour photo collection

John Armour–This is a picture of Abner Nichols, (very early 1900’s) from my late Grandfather Walter Armour’s collection. Abner Nichols married Eliza McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation James McNeely). My Great Grandfather, Robert Armour married Jessie McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation McNeely, Thomas Moore)

 

Each picture I see of Abner Nichols appears to me that you didn’t fool around with this man. However, I ran across this story today that made him look like everyone else. In one of the local newspapers was a tale of how the man that was famous for running the Nichols sawmill down at now Centennial Park was having a bit of a dilemma trying to get a gasoline engine started at his boathouse.

Abner was so stubborn he spent a whole day trying to get the darn thing going and finally the proud man admitted defeat. Well, Billy Montgomery was called in and Billy looked at it and then asked the old gentleman to try the engine once again. The engine still would not start. Billy tried the engine once again it immediately began to run like a well-oiled piece of machinery. Abner scratched his head and asked Billy what he had done. Billy smiled and replied that he had simply turned on the battery switch.

 

 

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A teenage boy tells his father, “Dad, there’s trouble with the car, it has water in the carburetor.” The father looks confused and says, “Water in the carburetor, that’s ridiculous!” But the son insists. “I tell you, the car has water in the carburetor.”

His father, starting to get a little nervous, says “You don’t even know what a carburetor is…. but I will check it out. Where is the car?”

“In the pool,” replies the son.

 

RELATED READING

Before and After at Centennial Park

Splinters of Sinders Nichols and Brides

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

 

Before and After at Centennial Park

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Centennial Park Carleton Place 2015–Photo by Linda Seccaspina- Photo taken  by Hawthorne Mill

 

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In 1900 Abner Nichols & Son brought their season’s log drive down the lake to their newly opened sawmill at the riverside at the end of Flora Street; while two drives of logs, ties and telegraph poles were reaching the mill operated by Williams, Edwards & Company at the dam. It was destroyed by fire in 1939.

Photo from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Both photos were taken from the same spot that I took the top picture from. Notice the two big trees on the right are still there.

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 Dec 1910, Wed  •  Page 1 .

The Old Nichol’s Swimming Hole in Carleton Place

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This photo taken from the south shore of the Mississippi River shows the foundry to the right, with the Findlay family’s boathouse at centre. Foundry buildings took up the whole property, right up to High Street.–Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

In the old days according to the files of the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum only the boys swam at the old Abner Nichols Mill. The girls swam at the old Findlay Boat house behind the foundry.

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Boys being boys would skinny dip, and it didn’t matter if it was day or night. Heck, they just knew there wouldn’t be any girls around. Abner Nichols & Son had their sawmill at the riverside on Flora Street. Nichols always supplied a wide plank for a diving board and they would call him Old Bill when he was out of earshot.

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William A. Nichols – 1870/1933-Photos from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Mayor of Carleton Place – 1902 – Planning & Sawmill Owner.

Bob Dowdall was the sawyer. He would roll the logs with a cane hook into the saw carriage, and it rolled back and forth on rollers. The planks were cut off by a man named Tom Hastings. He trimmed them and produced long pieces of slabs.

Memories from Ron MacFarlane

Historical Note

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Detail of a log dog and log chain with the initials “A.N.” for Abner Nichols
Late 1800s Early 1900s- North Lanark Regional Museum via Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

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Photo from Carleton Place Canadian files-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

When “Building Assetics” Go Wrong!

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Today I was looking for some information about the Hugh McMillan home on Bridge Street and came across this 1980’s news article about “the little yellow house”  and its continuing struggles. Just more information on the fight over a renovation—one that was assured to all that “it would compliment the area”.

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It began in November of 1986 when Judith Hughes, then owner of “the little yellow house,” began her battle against the proposed renovations to the former John Deere building 4.5 feet away. The one storey cinder block, owned by self-employed contractor Al Roberts, sat snugly in between the Abner Nichols and one of the Miller’s homes. Hughes said if  Roberts proceeded with his plans she would sue him for of the loss of enjoyment of her property.

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She also argued that the projected ‘ghastly’ renovations would destroy the quaint streetscape of Bridge Street, which she had personally worked hard to preserve. Roberts assured her that the heritage type renovations he planned would compliment her home. He also cited himself a heritage restoration expert to the Ottawa Citizen. The contractor said he had carried out more than 50 such jobs in Lanark county in the past five years.

Well, we all know the outcome of this story. The little house sits unoccupied, dwarfed by the “complimenting” building next door. This week I have noticed “a ‘we’re going to dig’ construction sign” on the front porch of “the little yellow house”. Who knows whats next?

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Photo- Linda Seccaspina.. newspaper photo- Ottawa Citizen 1986

Buy Linda Secaspina’s Books— Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac– Tilting the Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place and 4 others on Amazon or Amazon Canada or Wisteria at 62 Bridge Street in Carleton Place

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

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Question– August 24, 2015

Linda–Does anyone know anything about the little yellow house on Bridge Street? It has been empty for years, overgrown, but no matter what time of day you go past, 2 am, 3pm, all the lights in the house are always on.

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“The History as we know it so far..”

The “little yellow house” at 274 Bridge Street in Carleton Place is known locally as the “Abner Nichols House”. It was once designated as a municipal heritage building, and it is still on the 2015 list. According to a Conservation Review Board affidavit- in 1991, then owner, Judith Hughes requested it be removed as a protected building under the Heritage Act.  At the same time she was requesting another property she owned at 222 William Street to be repealed also. It is to be noted that in the late 80s Algonquin College renovated this home.

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Abner Nichols once owned a saw mill along the Mississippi River at the bottom of Flora street. Nichols was also in the timber business and owned a planning mill on the corner or Lake Ave and Moore Street in 1896. The Nichols home was the first home of a family that produced three mayors of Carleton Place over three generations. Nichols was also Carleton Place’s first Reeve, and served as Mayor in 1894 and in 1899. Later the house served as the rectory for St.James Anglican church.

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As of 2015 when I am writing this it doesn’t take much to notice the building has gone into disrepair over the years. I have no idea why the present owner (name withheld) continues to hold the property and not occupy it.  Then owner, Ms. Hughes was initially upset over the aesthetics of the building that was built next door. Joann Voyce said the apartment building that sits partially in front of the old Miller home was once the John Deere dealership. read- Heritage Homes Disputes- Abner Nichols House.

The two buildings side by side do not complement each other that is for sure. While I’m sure both structures are on legal property Hughes also argued at the time about the personal economic cost of attempting to sell a property that was designated heritage. So for now, only the lights remain on in the “little yellow house.”

Also read

Monday, October 3, 2011
The Parsonage House
Another of Carleton Place’s beautiful old homes is slowly dying. This pretty yellow frame house is on the north end of Bridge Street. It’s been empty for many years, caught up in a war over Heritage Designation. It was originally the parsonage house for the Methodist Church across the street. CLICK here

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The Carleton Place property standards does require the present owner to do repairs. But, if an order is given under property standards, the owner only has to do the minimum requirements to meet the request. I, like everyone else, would like this house to be restored to it former glory, but  owners of properties can and do decide the level of property maintenance as long as basics requirements are met. Last winter the top door facing Bridge Street blew open and the town of Carleton Place had to go and close it. I have been also told the roof is in need of immediate attention.  There is no doubt the full restoration of the Nichols house could become quite expensive at this point and time.

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The same thing is presently happening in Windsor, Ontario. A Windsor couple wants the city to remove a heritage designation from their Riverside Drive home, so that potential buyers won’t be dissuaded from considering its purchase. Similar to the Hughes 1991 case the homeowners asked the city to designate it as a heritage property in 1999. But now the couple want the status reversed so they can sell their home.

The Easton’s have asked for a repeal of the heritage designation, but city staff  recommended that the request be turned down. Now that the couple is selling the home, Bruck Easton said he and his wife have found that when they tell a buyer the house is a heritage property, “you can sort of watch the buyers just turn around and walk out.” The city’s planning, heritage and economic development standing committee dealt with the application at a meeting last week.The committee said there was nothing they could do. The Eastons are upset and plan to take the issue before city council soon.

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Many people seek out heritage homes when making a purchasing decision. Should the heritage designations stay? Things don’t stop being heritage just because someone wants to sell them. I think it is an issue that the right buyer needs to come along– more than the heritage issue. In the case of the Nichols home its fate appears quite bleak. I hope someone saves the little yellow house before it’s too late—or is it already just a matter of fact.–

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Photos- Linda Seccaspina and the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/23247837/274-bridge-street-carleton-place-carleton-place

UPDATE– Tis house will lose it hertiage designation Decemeber 21, 2021

https://www.toronto.com/news-story/10188600–demolition-is-forever-properties-significant-to-carleton-place-history-need-protection-stresses-heritage-committee/

$299,000

274 BRIDGE STREET
Carleton Place, Ontario K7C3H6

MLS® Number: 1243849

As the mayor of Carleton Place, Doug Black said: Thank you Eden
on your very thoughtful email to myself on behalf of council.
 
There is no doubt we need more residents like Eden especially whoever purchases the property.

To Whom It May Concern:

Hello, my name is Eden Cain, I am currently a grade 11 student at the local high school, Notre Dame. I am a member of our student council and am a member of the local Carleton Place community. I am also an avid lover of Carleton Place local history. I am writing to you regarding the house at 274 Bridge Street in Carleton Place.

You may recognise it as the bright yellow house that you see driving, biking, or walking down Bridge Street. This house has recently been posted for sale. I have walked by this house countless times and often stop to take in its beautiful potential. To me this house is history at its finest and one of the many beautiful historic homes in Carleton Place. This house to me represents everything that Carleton Place is about, preserving history and coming together as a community. I saw the for-sale sign and quite honestly, I felt disappointed because I am obviously at an age that I personally would not be able to buy this home. I would more than anything like to see this beautiful historic home be restored and loved like it deserves to be. I hopefully looked at the listing online, and it does not even discuss the beautifulness and the specifics of the house itself, only the land which it is on. It also talks about all the new things could be build in its Place. I do understand that it may be in disrepair, but it just needs people to love and see its true beauty.

I have done a lot of research regarding this house and its history. This house was the home of Abner Nichols who moved to Carleton Place in 1867 from Kingston. Mr. Nichols is a big part of Carleton Places history; he was the Deputy Reeve in 1890 and he was even Mayor of Carleton Place from 1894-1899. He also worked as a sawyer at Gilles and McLaren Canada sawmill. In 1879 he opened his own planning mill on Rosemond Street. In 1886 he built another much larger mill and window sash factory at Lake St and Moore avenue. It was operated by three generations for over 70 years. Abner Nichols and Sons later opened a sawmill on Flora Street, this was the last sawmill to bring logs down the Mississippi River. Abner’s son William was Mayor of CP in 1902 and his grandson also named William was Mayor in 1936 and 1937. Three generations of Carleton Place Mayors and members of our beloved Carleton Place community.

You may be wondering what I am trying to get at, as you can see this house holds important historic value to Carleton Place history. I believe that this house should be covered under the Ontario Heritage Act. The address 274 Bridge Street was once covered under this act. I am aware that on Wednesday January 14,1991 there was a public hearing to determine whether the classification of this house under the Ontario Heritage Act should be repealed. The owner at the time was Judith Hughes, she was looking for it to be repealed in hopes of selling it at the time when there was interest in the home. On the 24th of July the same year, the repeal was passed. One of Hughes main objections at the time was that there were hundreds of other buildings that had equal significance. I think that while that may have been true at the time, with Carleton Place growing at an extreme rate, I think its more important to ever to preserve the history of Carleton Place, the Places that give us hope and see the true beauty.

I think that this house for me represents more than just preserving history, it represents having a vision and fighting for what you truly believe in. In all honesty this house, even though it is a part of history, it represents the future-the Carleton Place I want to live in. That to me is one of the reasons why this house should be preserved, and possibly restored as a historic site. It would crush me to see this house be demolished and made into a new modern house or a duplex. I know this may be harder to take coming from someone as young as myself, but I know I am not the only one with the drive to keep the beautiful history of my home Carleton Place alive and thriving. I think that with the last two years more than ever hope is what we all need. Please consider my message and realize that to me this is not just a house and to those who are reading this, I hope you see that. I am willing to do anything in hopes of saving this beautiful site.

Please email me with any questions, concerns, or if you need more convincing. If you are passionate like I am or if you think you can help me in this, I would greatly appreciate you reaching out.  I would g appreciate a response, and rather quickly as the market is selling so quickly during these times. I am very passionate about this and will continue to fight for what is right.

I greatly appreciate you taking the time to read this and to consider my words. Together let us save history and preserve the Carleton Place we all know and love.

Sincerely,

Eden Cain

historicalnotes

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John Armour–This is a picture of Abner Nichols, (very early 1900’s) from my late Grandfather Walter Armour’s collection. Abner Nichols married Eliza McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation James McNeely).

My Great Grandfather, Robert Armour married Jessie McNeely (daughter of 2nd generation McNeely, Thomas Moore)

Related reading

The World of William Abner Nichols

An Amusing Abner Nichols and His Boat

Before and After at Centennial Park

Splinters of Sinders Nichols and Brides

Looking for Information– Nichols Family History