Tag Archives: abandoned

Documenting The House on Highway 7

Standard
Documenting The House on Highway 7
Clara Ashton

Clara AshtonAbandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

Yesterday at 9:55 AM  · Oh the nostalgia. I sometimes shed a tear driving by. My childhood home, now sitting empty and without a doubt falling apart on the inside.

It’s not technically “abandoned” I guess. Its vacant and I don’t think the inside has been maintained since 2013.

They cut the grass in the summer and if I’m not mistaken they use the barns for storage, but the home has not seen a family since June 2013 when we moved out. In the winter nobody plows the driveway, so it really looks lonely that 6 months of the year.

The farmhouse is located outside of Carleton Place, right before scotch corners road and tatlock road when you’re going westbound on highway 7.

Part of me wonders if they’re sitting on it to eventually sell to a developer, but that’s nothing more than speculation.

It’s been sad slowly watching things fall apart throughout the years. I wish they’d do something with it.

Clara AshtonTom Montreuil my mom and dad bought it in the late 90s. My mom ran her equine boarding and tack store out of it from 2001-2010ish

*I’m not recommending that anyone trespasses, it’s very much owned by someone*

Clara Ashton
 · 

Amanda Grace Emon photo from 2011

Ahh reminiscing on old times!
Clara AshtonAmanda Grace Emon used to have a good photo of the kitchen… can’t seem to find it. This is my sister and I from one Halloween, you can see the mudroom and part of the kitchen…
So many memories in this house
Clara Ashton
From the Tales of Carleton Place

Victoria WilliamsonThe golf course owns it! I’m sure some day they will add more holes for the course maybe make it into a club house.

Troy StanzelThat was my grandfather’s farm Lindsey Thompson

Ashley MarieI used to shop here when Clara was little. Her mom is a wonderful lady. I miss riding here and spending my hard earned barn chore money 💜

Emma Drummond-LeclairAshley Marie right?! I remember when Clara was a little girl too! Running around the shop!

Dawna HurdisUsed to be a beautiful home when my Grandpa owned it. So much character on the inside! Saddens me as well each time I drive by and see it deteriorating. Lots of child hood memories on that property!

helma DowdallWhen I was a child this house belonged to a Mr. and Mrs Boland. They had no family. I always thought that they had the house built but I could be wrong.

Jessica RaceyI’ve always loved this home!! I can never understand why people just leave homes to slowly deteriorate. Why not rent it out, if it’s just sitting there and someone still owns it?

Dave HickThe attic is full of guano and the house has virtually no insulation knob and tube wiring an outdated oil furnace single pane windowsHowever it would be a great candidate for a complete overhaul

Tanis CordickDave Hick we were u set the assumption the owner of the golf course had bought it and was going to use the house as a clubhouse, I’m guessing that’s not the case 🤷‍♀️

Dave HickTanis Cordick i did an inspection on it before the golf course bought itBarn is in good shapeGood deal on the land because house needed lots of work

Remembering Homes — The Wood Home

Standard
Remembering Homes — The Wood Home
ll Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley
ll Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley
ll Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

All Photos from-Celeste Reisinger from Abandoned – Ottawa/Gatineau & The Valley

So what can we find out about the house? Every house needs to be remembered.

Gail BarrDan Grace purchased it last year – uses the farm land. This farm was the Woods family homestead. Was burnt several years ago when we had a fire arsonist. Read-Fires of Lanark County 2002

Joan Armstrong-Mary Young born June 11, 1809 married Walter Wood June 18, 1832 and in 4 days they immigrated to Canada from Lanarkshire, Scotland and settled on Lot 2, Conc. 9 ,(Hwy 29) in Pakenham Township.Their 4 children were born here.My mother’s notes say that her Grandmother Margaret must’ve been the oldest as her year of birth was 1833. There were 5 girls and 1 boy William who stayed on the farm. There’s no mention of the girls names.Looking through the names I didn’t see Rita.

Jenny DunslowJoan Armstrong ok. I’m not sure Rita’s name was Wood. That arsonist did burn her family home. When she went to visit, strangely enough, she showed me what she found in the yard. It was burnt pages from the book Faces of Fire. I always thought that was the house she was referring to. She was a very sweet lady who lived in Constance Bay and married to Don Dolan. She unfortunately passed away in 2004 I believe was the year. Since then, Don also passed.

Joan ArmstrongJenny Dunslow I’m sorry to hear that. Yes, that was the house the guy tried to burn , sad to say.

Catherine CochranYes, but Don Dolan was her second husband. She was married to Gerry Timmons first but he died in a car a car accident when their four children were fairly young

Catherine CochranThis is where William and Claire Wood raised their family. My former mother in law , Jean Cochran, (Robert Cochran) was born and raised here. Jean’s brother, Edward (Ted) took over the farm after William .There were four children in Claire and William’s family. They were William (Bill, Jean, Edward (Ted) and Rita.Jim Wood took over the farm after his dad, Ted, and subsequently sold it a few years ago.

Joan ArmstrongThis was my Great Grandmother’s home, Margaret (Wood) Buchanan.

Helen N LeviDelightful happy family lived there when I was first introduced to that beautiful old home

Walter Wood– thanks to Rose Mary Sarsfield

BIRTH1801Airdrie, North Lanarkshire, Scotland
DEATH20 Aug 1894 (aged 92–93)Pakenham, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
BURIALAuld Kirk CemeteryMississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
MEMORIAL ID204059982 · View Source

1894, Friday August 24, The Almonte Gazette front page
Almost a Centenarian

Another of the early settlers of Lanark County passed quietly out of life on Monday last, when Mr Walter Wood, of Upper Pakenham, was summoned across the mysterious bourne whence none return. He had been ill but a week, though bedfast for a year prior to his death, and blind for the past six years. He was clearheaded to the last. Before he reached the closing decade of the century he had always been hale and vigorous. The late Mr Wood was born in Dundivan, near Airdrie, Scotland, in the year 1796, and therefore attended the great age of 98 years. In 1832 he married Mary Young, sister of the late Peter, Robert, and William Young, of Ramsay, and four days after the marriage they sailed from Scotland for Canada. A few months after their arrival they settled on the farm on the ninth line of Pakenham on which they lived the balance of their long lives, doing their full share of the pioneer work and enduring hardships incident to life in Lanark County in the thirties and forties. Mrs Wood died seven years ago. Seven children were born to them, viz.: Mrs Buchanan, Miss Janet Wood, W.Y. Wood, on the homestead; Mrs James Barker, Ramsay; Mrs Taylor, Mrs Edwards and Miss Jane Wood, of Ottawa. Fourteen grandchildren and five great-grandchildren also mourn the loss of the venerable gentleman. Deceased possessed qualities that won for him the warm friendship of all who knew him, and he will be long and favourably remembered in the neighbourhood. His was a quiet disposition. He never sought public office. To the last he had a good memory, and was fond of relating incidents of life in these parts in the early days. He was an ardent Reformer, and a Presbyterian. The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon, to the eighth line cemetery, when a very large procession followed the remains to their resting place – a fitting testimony to the worth of the departed.

Abandoned Properties — What a Shame

Standard
Abandoned Properties — What a Shame

 

Exploring a Really Old Abandoned House in Ontario Canada - YouTube

There was a story that a butcher murdered his family and then took his own life in an old abandoned home. The only record I could find is an old story from 1924.

I hate the fact there are abandoned homes. How do you claim an abandoned home in Canada? To ensure you can make a legal claim of abandonment, take the time to do your due diligence. That means trying to locate the right owner. Remember that even though the property is abandoned, that doesn’t negate the fact that it’s still owned by someone.

How To Acquire Abandoned Real Estate In Canada–Click

 

A Dying Breed: Ontario's Forgotten Abandoned Houses | HuffPost Canada Life

 

Abandoned house won't be an eyesore anymore. County just bought it for  $515K. - nj.com

 

Feb. 20, 1924– The dead bodies of Joseph Whistle, -and his wife and their 17-year-old daughter, were found in the Wissel home, four, miles southeast of here, early today. The body of Louis Kuntz  a butcher of Homer, 111. brother of Mrs. Wissel, was found a short distance away.

Near his body was found the gun with which all are, believed to have been slain. Kuntz left bis home in Homer about midnight Monday to call on the Wissel family. From the position of the bodies the gunshot wounds and other factors in the case, officers who investigated believed that Kuntz shot and killed his brother-in-law, his sister and niece, and then took his own life. The shooting was done with a rifle.

Trouble between Russell Kuntz of Homer and his cousin, Luella Wissel, the 17-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wissel. who live on a farm near here, was thought today to be the cause of the shooting by Louis Kuntz of Mr. and Mrs. Wissel, their daughter, Luella, and himself.

The shooting is said to have occurred Monday night, but the bodies were not found until midnight last night. The bodies were found by George Kutledge and Tom Richards, the latter a constable of this place. According to. their story, they were asked to search for Louis Kuntz, – who had been missing from Homer since Monday evening.

They went to the Wissel home, where they first found the body of Mr. Wissel lying near the cow barn. When they went into the house they found the bodies of Mrs. Wissel and of the 17-year-old daughter, Luella. The girl had been shot twice. Apparently Kuntz had then turned the gun upon himself and died shortly after.

It is not definitely known whether the alleged relations of Russell Kuntz and Luella Wissel was the cause of the killing, but it is generally thought so here. Kuntz. who was in business wit his father here, is married and lives here with his wife.

 

What Can You Do About The Abandoned House On Your Street? - Toronto Realty  Blog

 

 

 -

CLIPPED FROM

The Decatur Herald
Decatur, Illinois
21 Feb 1924, Thu  •  Page 1

 

relatedreading

The Abandoned Appleton Mill

The Abandoned Smiths Falls Hospital 2011

Photographer Finds Money in a Local Abandoned Home

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

The Church that Died

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

Burning Down the House — Literally in Lanark County

Investigating the Basement of the Carleton Place Canadian – If These Walls Could Talk

Channeling John Gillies

What’s the Strangest Thing You Have Found Outside?

Standard
What’s the Strangest Thing You Have Found Outside?

17191001_10154334095301179_1396220995835710191_n (1).jpg

Adam DowdallAdam Dowdall’s Metal Detecting Group

If you follow Adam Dowdall’s Metal Detecting Facebook page you know I have written about some of his finds (see links below)–mostly coins and other bits of paraphernalia. But,  what have people really found outside in Lanark County?

Some have found old abandoned cars standing for what must of been for 20-30 years in the middle of the bush– kilometres into the bush, no roads or forestry roads near by. They look like they might have been dropped from the sky, but no real indent in the ground of possible impact.

How about an old shovel and a grave marking which in reality still exists when they built the railway and it is not unusual to find old grave sites at the rapids from expired loggers during the Spring runoffs.

What is the oddest thing someone found?

 

Outhouse foundation.jpg

Photo Dualsport

 

This happened in 2013 and I wrote about it and it was in my book: Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities



Helpful Hints before Burying Your Husband in the Backyard


What happened to 74-year-old Novato, California resident Dale Smith? His wife Evelyn age 55 never mentioned he had left to anyone until two weeks ago. She had told a questioning neighbour Phil Olbranz that her honey was missing and then began speaking about her spouse in the past tense. The concerned good neighbour did what anyone else would do and called the police.  Cadaver dogs were brought to the home and found poor Dale’s body buried in the backyard.

So Evelyn being a tad concerned when the body was discovered hired an attorney after the FBI was called in. Her attorney told the press that Evelyn said that Dale had been very sick. If Dale did simply die of natural causes Evelyn might get off lightly. Burying his remains improperly under the new brick BBQ she had just built over his body would simply be a misdemeanor.

Why on earth would you do such a thing? Did she not think maybe the kids might contact dear old Dad at some point? Father’s Day was barely three months away at that point of discovery. Helpful Hints before Burying Your Husband in the Backyard

What happened to 74-year-old Novato, California resident Dale Smith? His wife Evelyn age 55 never mentioned he had left to anyone until two weeks ago. She had told a questioning neighbour Phil Olbranz that her honey was missing and then started talking about her spouse in the past tense. So the concerned good neighbour did what anyone else would do and called the police.  Cadaver dogs were brought to the home and found poor Dale’s body buried in the backyard.

So Evelyn being a tad concerned when the body was discovered hired an attorney after the FBI was called in. Her attorney told the press that Evelyn said that Dale had been very sick. If Dale did simply die of natural causes Evelyn might get off lightly. Burying his remains improperly under the new brick BBQ she had just built over his body would simply be a misdemeanor.

Why on earth would you do such a thing? Did she not think maybe the kids might contact dear old Dad at some point?  Father’s Day was barely three months away at that point of discovery. An autopsy by the Marin County coroner could not determine the cause of his death. Dale Smith was a Korean War veteran and retired contractor. His wife used to work for the U.S. Postal Service.

There are so many things that Evelyn could have done before it got this far.  I mean she used to work for the postal service and as the USPS’s motto says:

“If it fits it ships” !

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

 

Related reading

What Did Adam Dowdall find this week?

The Mystery Ruins of Carleton Place- Photos by Adam Dowdall

The Luck of the “Irish”– Coins Found by Adam Dowdall

Adam Dowdall Just Found the Oldest Coin in Beckwith County

What Did Adam Dowdall Find in My Carleton Place Yard?

Abandoned

The Abandoned Appleton Mill

The Abandoned Smiths Falls Hospital 2011

Photographer Finds Money in a Local Abandoned Home

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

The Church that Died

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

Burning Down the House — Literally in Lanark County

Investigating the Basement of the Carleton Place Canadian – If These Walls Could Talk

Channeling John Gillies

Memories and Mentions of Names in Maberly

The Forgotten Clayton School House

 

The Abandoned Smiths Falls Hospital 2011

Standard

pcr-1382.jpg

Year/Format: 1910, Picture
Debi Cavanagh Sparks– The photo is of St Francis hospital, now the Smiths Falls site of the Perth, Smiths Falls Hospital. The Chamber St hospital then eventually known at the north unit hospital was abandoned and then eventually torn down and the property is still for sale.

This was found online posted at 10/8/2011 1:34 AM by- Sweets

A few friends and I decided to visit the old abandoned hospital about an hour or two before the sun was going down (great light!) to take pictures. When we got there, three young girls were standing outside giggling (maybe 12 years old)
They told us that the building is haunted and wouldn’t go in. Someone else must have been there recently because one of the doors was wide open. Anyways we explored the floors (not the basement though.. I wish we would have). They mostly were all the same.. empty rooms maybe some curtains, a lot of peeling paint, a few toilets and bathtubs. When we got to the top floor it was covered in dead birds so we didn’t explore that floor either. A little further up there

Smiths Falls Hospital - Ontario Abandoned Places

One of the bathrooms

a better view of how large the building is

hallway

this was one of the areas that was not just a normal room. It must have been either a common room or for the staff, I think across the hall or somewhere near was another area that looked like it might have been a kitchen

No photo description available.

Smiths Falls-St. Francis General Hospital c1955
Colleen Kenny

 The whole South unit sat empty for many many years was vandalized and stripped of all it’s copper fittings and things finally the town convince the people that owned it at the time they needed to tear it down as it was dangerous. The new hospital is wonderful state of the art and what is now classified as a Perth and Smith Falls Hospital as the two hospitals amalgamated about 20 years ago. State of the art surgical theatres in both hospitals we even have our own CAT scan machine and lots of specialists come to either hospital in the city which makes driving for appointments a lot easierOur little town has certainly grown.

On May 16, 1910, Mrs. Mary E. Chambers donated a parcel of land to the town of Smith’s Falls. On this parcel of land the town built a hospital designed by local architect G.T Martin and constructed by John Davidson for a contracted price of $29,000. Money to build the hospital was raised by the town council and members of the town.

The hospital was named The Chambers Hospital out of respect for Mrs. Chamber’s deceased husband and son. It opened in 1912 with a capacity of 45-50 beds. The original building was a two-storey structure with basement built of Milton terra cotta brick. The front of the property had a three-storey veranda with Ionic capped columns.

The north-west corner contained a small sun parlor for the children’s ward and a two-storey sun parlor on the south side. Floors were constructed of oiled hard-wood.

To prevent fire, fire hoses connected to the town’s water system were located at each end of the main hall. Each floor also had six pails full of water (before the invention of the fire extinguisher).

The main corridor housed the anaesthetic room, operating room, sterilizing room, doctor’s wash-up room and doctor’s dressing room. Three of the rooms were built with floor tiles that extended eight inches up the walls. This allowed the rooms to be washed out by hose with the waste carried away to drains.

The basement housed the nurse’s dining room and rooms for the cook, housemaids and caretaker. A dumb waiter ran from the kitchen to the top of the building.

Extensive renovations were carried out in 1958 which brought the number of beds to 94. In 1968 further renovations were undertaken to bring the patient capacity to 100 beds.

With budget cost-cutting on their minds, in 1975 the Ontario Government looked into whether operating two hospitals was necessary. After much dispute the Sisters of Providence agreed to sell the St. Francis Hospital to the Ontario Government on July 16, 1975. The two hospitals were amalgamated to become the Smith’s Falls Community Hospital. The former St. Francis Hospital became the North Unit which focused on active treatment care while the Chambers Hospital became the South Unit which focused on chronic care and rehabilitation.

On March 31, 1995 the hospital was again amalgamated, this time with the Great War Memorial Hospital of Perth District (GWM Site). The merger formed a new corporation called the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. The merger has facilitated the rationalization of inpatient and outpatient services across the two hospital sites, which are separated by a distance of 20 km.

Sources: Canadian Builder March 1913, vol 3 Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital

One lingering question is when the demolition of the original homestead occurred, which sat between the powerhouse and the 1958 addition – it is plainly visible from the scar on the two buildings and foundation ruins where it used to sit.

Regardless, the final change for the South Unit came in 1995, when the Smiths Falls Community Hospital merged with The Great War Memorial Hospital in Perth, located 23km to the west of town. After the amalgamation, it was decided that only one hospital needed to remain operational; and that was the North Unit. The South Unit was shuttered and left to rot away, despite attempts to sell it as office space.

Related reading:—

Photographer Finds Money in a Local Abandoned Home

The Abandoned Farm House in Carleton Place — Disappearing Farms

The Church that Died

Inside the Old Honey Pot — The Henderson Apiaries Carleton Place

Burning Down the House — Literally in Lanark County

Investigating the Basement of the Carleton Place Canadian – If These Walls Could Talk

Channeling John Gillies

The Kick and Push Town of Folger — Now a Ghost Town

Standard

25870524.jpg

Found online by Clay 70

Folger was founded along the Kingston and Pembroke Railway —the Kick and Push Railway Trail. This railway was founded by the Kingston and Pembroke Iron Mining Company and came to Folger around the 1880’s. Wilbur and Robertsville to the south were founded on iron mining. Folger happened to have some of the best farming soil in the Lanark Highlands with 45 feet deep in clay and iron and so it was a logical place to start a village as well. Folger was another location named for promoters of the K & P. The Folgers were prominent Kingston businessmen who were engaged in shipping, banking, railroading and mining. B.W. Folger was for many years General Manager of the K & P.

This was a community which depended heavily on the railroad to support its lumber and mining interests. One local man recalls that “there was a dead end siding out there called Mopeville. Cars were known to run right off the end of the track at times, and they had a heck of a time getting them back on.”

The coming of the K & P enabled area men to go hunting further afield than before, for the northern part of the line was especially good for that purpose.

Today, only one elderly couple still live here. I got all the info. about the ghost settlement from them (Norman and Lillian Sweeney). The Sweeney’s settled here in 1960, 3 yrs prior to the railway lines being lifted, which forced Folger into ghosttownhood.

The village was founded in the 1880’s as a farming community. It grew to include a train station, a store, a sawmill, a post office, a school and homes. The mining company surveyed 70 lots from Lavant Station northward to Folger.

When the Sweeney’s moved here in 1960 the town was still in good stead. There were 6 families and the farms were still prospering. Hydro power had come in 1951. However, with the end of the trains running north of Snow Rd. in 1963 and with the lifting of the railway tracks in 1970 the hamlet went bust. It was once bragged that the village grew the highest corn stocks in all of Lanark County. There were also 50 or more head of cattle which grazed the open hilly fields. In 1960 the taxes were incredibly cheap. Would you believe for 200 acres the annual bill was only $9? Also read–

Clippings of the K & P Railroad Kick and Push –Buchanan Scrapbooks

 

97329942.jpgK&P Hiking Trail at the South Levant Road, former site of the K&P Levant train …

 

The Sweeney’s built their present home in 1975, which replaced their previous structure built in 1887. Here they raised their 9 kids. The kids went to school in Calabogie and elsewhere. A school bus did eventually come to Folger to pick up the kids way back in the bush in 1968. This didn’t last long, though apparently another bus came to pick up school kids in the 1990’s.

You would think playing sports would have been an impossibility considering the distances to larger communities. However, three of the Sweeney boys became pitchers for the Lavant baseball team. The local kids also used to dam up the Clyde River in the winter. It ran right through the village and so it offered the only spot to play hockey.

The road into Folger is amazingly well-plowed in the winter and has been for many years. The only snow issue occured during a huge storm in 1971.

For some extra income Lillian used to send homemade cans of cream to Toronto. Then when Coleman’s came to Carleton Place a truck was sent twice a week to pick up her cream cans. Norman worked the farm and also had stints with the army and Ontario Hydro. Norman served in WW2 in the Italian campaign against the Germans.

By the 1980’s the village was a full-fledged ghost town. Much of the former open fields had been slowly reclaimed by the forest. Today, in the Sweeney’s retirement they have the comfort of satellite tv and a phone line, which they finally got in 2007. Their Hummingbird feeders are often frequented by many of their tiny, feathered friends.

To get to Folger take the Kick and Push Trail northward from Lavant Station. When you see an abandoned brown home on the right (built circa 1930), across the creek, you are in downtown Folger. 

 

 

The Kick and Push Railway

HISTORY:

The Kingston and Pembroke Railway (K & P) was a Canadian railway that operated in eastern Ontario. The railway was seen as a business opportunity by business people in Kingston, Pembroke, Montreal and New York. It would support the lumber (especially pine lumber which was in high demand across Canada and the United States) and mining industries, as well as the agricultural economy in eastern Ontario.

Incorporated in 1871, the K&P was intended to run from Kingston to Pembroke. By 1884, approximately 180 km of mainline and sidings had been laid, reaching Renfrew where it ceased after 12 years of construction. The K & P never did reach Pembroke. On January 1, 1913, the K & P Railroad officially became part of the CPR. The line was gradually abandoned beginning in the 1950s, with the last operating section from Kingston to Tichborne closing in 1986. The K & P is affectionately remembered as the Kick and Push railroad.

Folger Ghost Town

Folger Ghost Town is a house in Ontario. Folger Ghost Town is situated northwest of Lavant Station, south of Burnt Meadow.