Tag Archives: 7th line

Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

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Beckwith Mystery — Anyone Remember a Meteor Coming Down on the 7th Line?

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Adam Millar sent me this yesterday:

Hello, just wondering if you have ever seen historical records of a meteor in the Carleton Place area. My friend’s father told her of the huge hole he filled in his field and in the middle was a large meteorite (about the size of a small soccer ball – approx 60lbs).
Pretty sure she said his father had cursed the depression it left in his field. Farm is located on the highway (15 or 29 or whatever it is these days) and 7th line Beckwith. This would have been a huge fireball and likely very loud by the size of the meteorite. Thanks! -Adam
Well Adam, I found two instances but let’s ask our readers what they can remember and gather some comments. Here are my suggestions…
 May 26, 1957
November 1964

From Jim Mahoney– thanks to Glenda Mahoney

Hi Linda. It came from the east and went straight down the townline road high above the treeline. There were very few houses there so he had an unrestricted view. It was a bright neon green colour with a tail behind it almost like a comet or shooting star. . It was huge. It made no sound. It was glowing as bright as the sun. He could see it coming for what seemed like a long time and watched it until it disappeared towards Perth. It appeared to stay perfectly level. Straight shot down the Townline Road.—Jim also said that he waited for somebody to mention this glowing neon green sphere but nobody did. Nobody talked about it and he was quite surprised that there was no big fuss made about such an amazing thing so he eventually just forgot about it. He had told me about it a few times over the years and when I saw your article I told him about it. Once again my Linda clears up a mystery. Jim is thrilled u printed the story about it. He has always wondered why there was never a big deal made out of it. It is a very satisfying conclusion to his personal mystery.

relatedreading

The Spirit of the 7th Line

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The Spirit of the 7th Line

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Photo Source below: Carleton Saga, by Harry and Olive Walker, page 507. Does anyone have a photograph of the original building? From Bytown.net

A landmark to the Church of Kirk of Beckwith that is no longer with us. The stone church called “The Church of the Cross Keys” was built in 1832, replacing a log church building. It served the first two Canadian generations of the first large settlement of Gaelic-speaking Scottish Highlanders in the district of Upper Canada north of the Rideau River.

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Joann Voyce sent us this newspaper photo–thanks Joann!

The 7th line is a dead end if you look at Google Maps. “They’d be walking to this church. They didn’t have horses back then,” said Reeve Richard Kidd. “They’d have to cross the Jock River and swamp and they had to do that in their bare feet because they would only have one pair of shoes.”

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The photo below is what the dead end of the 7th line looks like today. Kind of hard to imagine church folks walking that kind of mileage and in rough conditions, but they did. It was originally a log building centrally located on the 7th concession and there were separate entrances for men and women, but the building burnt and was replaced in 1832.

 

Below is what “The Church of the Cross Keys” looks like today. An enclosed cairn with a view of the remnants of a foundation of once what was. Scattered stones follow the lines of the foundation but part of the stone made its way to Franktown United Church for its construction.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Jun 1966, Sat,  Page 44

Today I stood there and became overwhelmed at once was and wished I could have spent one hour back in time. I wanted to meet the people that are now just spirits among the building ruins behind the cairn, which is all that remains behind the pioneer landmark that Reverend  Buchanan was never allowed to preach in. This is something every family in Lanark County should make sure their children see and remember the story.

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historicalnotes

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Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

relatedreading

 

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

The Gnarled Beckwith Oak

So Where is that Gnarled Oak in Beckwith?

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

What do you Know about the Prince of Wales Cairn?

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

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Know your ancestors thanks to Donna Mcfarlane

This is the Rev. James Carmichael who preached one of the last sermons at the old church on the Beckwith Township 7th line….mentioned in one of your articles– Have you read The Spirit of the 7th Line?

History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

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History Still Lives on at The McEwen House in Beckwith

 

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1974

 

It took seven long years for the McEwen’s to build this stone house on the 7th line, about a half mile west of Highway 29. Made of local limestone it has a centre door way with Cross and Bible panels, sidelights, and a square fanlight at the top. Directly over the door is proudly marked 1873, the day that the house was finally completed.

Set in a grove of lovely trees the house has a snake fence separating it from the roadway and at the rear there was once barns, a stable, a tack house and a drive shed. The house that remained in the family for decades was one of the finest homes in Beckwith at one point.

 

 

 

The dining room has a ‘dado’ once known as a chair rail, and all the rooms were finished as it was truly a house of distinction with a boxed staircase located in the centre hall. The kitchen has an interesting porthole window facing West and recessed windows are all panelled and have bubble glass panes. Beamed ceilings, golden ash woodwork, and pegged floors grace the  house as well as matching doors throughout with 6 panels and enamelled doorknobs.

That large staircase carried the feet of a family that led upwards to three bedrooms complete with floors made of Balsam Poplar or Balm of Gilead. It was once a popular tree as it also had medicinal properties of balsam poplar that lie in the winter buds. These are black, upright and sticky, and are strongly aromatic and if chewed taste tarry and hot.

It is not surprising that the buds also contain and are covered with waxy resins, terpenes and phenolics with disinfectant properties.  It is among the fastest growing trees in Canada, up to a foot each year, especially when young. The trees are short-lived, normally up to about 100 years, but used as flooring like this home it can give a golden glow to the atmosphere of the home.

The former ell and woodshed was converted in the 70s by Eve and Peter Levers who bought the home from Clarence McEwen. Today the house is still there with a few minor changes.

When I had to turn either red or left on Highway 29; it was a no brainer, and I immediately felt drawn to the left. It was the right move as sure enough, barely half a mile now the road, was the McEwen home. It was set back farther than what I had originally thought and thought of living there the long cold winters in this secluded area. In fact I could still see in my mind “Bossin’ Billy” McEwen Muirhead trudging down the road after another argument with her husband with her coat hem blowing in the wind.

The barns were no longer there, but the property was well maintained and looked loved. That’s all that mattered to me, the history of the McEwen house still lives on– and that’s what counts.

 

 

historicalnotes

 

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Jayne Munro-Ouimet–Hi Linda, Here is another McEwen house in Beckwith.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

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The House of Daughters –Stonecroft House

Update on The Manse in Beckwith

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Home and Garden Before Home and Garden Magazine

The James Black Homestead

The Mysterious Riddell— H B Montgomery House

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

The Manse on the 7th Line of Beckwith

Rescuing the Money Pits —The Other Dunlop Home with the Coffin Door

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

Before and After in Carleton Place –The Doctor is in!

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Was This the Architect of the Findlay Homes on High Street?

The Carleton Place House That Disappeared

The McCarten House of Carleton Place

Old McRostie Had a Farm in Carleton Place

Time Capsule in the ‘Hi Diddle Day’ House?

The Louis on Sarah Street for $43,500 — Before and After– Architecture in Carleton Place

Memories of Mississippi Manor

Day in the Life of a 70’s Pattie Drive Home – The Stay at Home Mom Era

Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

Dim All The Lights — The Troubled Times of the Abner Nichols Home on Bridge Street

The Brick Houses of Carleton Place

So What Happened to The Findlay House Stone?

The Stanzel Homes of Carleton Place

The Appleton Chinchilla House

 

 

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