Tag Archives: 60s

The Magic of Television — Linda Knight Seccaspina

Standard
The Magic of Television — Linda Knight Seccaspina

The Magic of Television — Linda Knight Seccaspina

I once wrote a story about writing letters as a child to the media and it got me thinking.The first TV program I remember watching as a child was the Mantovani Show, and not only was it boring, but it was in black and white. But then exciting things came to television like Coca Cola and Dick Clark. Here were some of my favourites:

Cartoon Corner and Howdy Doody 

Cartoon Corner, Friendly Giant and Howdy Doody were daily favourites of mine in black and white on CBC. I also remembered having to unplug the TV when a thunderstorm occurred in the afternoon as my Mother said it was “going to blow the house up if one of those bolts wrapped around the venetian blinds”.

Razzle Dazzle

Every night at 5 in 1961 I would watch the CBC- TV show Razzle Dazzle hosted by Suzanne Somers’ husband, Alan Hamel. I had entered a writing contest and was eagerly waiting to hear if I won a pen with my “meatless meat pie” essay. A few weeks later I found out that I had indeed won a Razzle Dazzle pen for my story along with a photo of Howard the Turtle.

Hockey Night in Canada

In 1967 the Toronto Maple Leafs won the Stanley Cup and I was a member of the Dave Keon fan club who scored the winning goal that year for the last game. I was a proud card carrying member, and for 25 cents you got a signed glossy photo of him and a membership card. 

The day after the playoffs I brought in that black and white 8 by 10 photo of him and taped it to the classroom blackboard. My teacher Mrs. Shufelt, who was not a fan of Dave Keon or said team, had an upset look on her face when she saw it. Yes, it was worth the 25 cents I had spent on it. I can still see the frown on her face like it was yesterday.

Hello Boys and Girls, it’s time for Magic Tom!

Every afternoon as a child, I was glued to the TV set awaiting my beloved Magic Tom Auburn on CFCF TV out of Montreal. Tom once described himself as a “man who played with silk hankies” but to me and every child he was a man with something new up his sleeve every single day. Canada’s Man of Magic was never fully appreciated by my Father as he constantly said Magic Tom needed to polish his act up. 

Magic Tom once said that little girls only wanted to be three things in life: a Mommy, a Nurse, and an Airline Stewardess. It was the same thing I heard a few years later in the Cowansville High School Vice Principal’s office when I told him I wanted to be a fashion designer.  I often wondered if they were related.

Tom began his career at age 13 with a bout of scarlet fever, a magic book and a lot of time on his hands just outside Cornwall. It is the unspoken ethic of all magicians to not reveal the secrets, and once in a blue moon Tom did. Sometimes the kids thought he was cheating and expressed their sentiments– but the next time you saw the same trick, maybe you didn’t see that glass of milk sinking under the red cloth– and wondered if you had been right the first time.

Each day I waited until the end of the show to see the empty silver dish suddenly become full of candy for the kids with a simple mere tap of his magician’s wand. No matter how hard I looked I could not find out how Magic Tom did this trick. 

I later found out however that this same trick was performed in WW11 by a small group of French Patriots who were being held prisoner by the Germans. They made a deal with their captors that if they performed this trick they would be let go. There was a happy ending and they were freed. 

Magic Tom and his wife Dolores have long passed and are buried in the Cornwall region at the St. Lawrence Valley Cemetery near Long Sault/Cornwall. I hope people remember Magic Tom as a  kind man who brought magic to the people as he pushed the boundaries of wonder for all of us. 

Some people say there isn’t magic. Some people say there is. I say there always will be— as in a way, we are all magicians, and so was television when I grew up in the 50s and 60s. They provided a wonderful open door to the everyday pleasures when life was just  a simpler world.

Clippings of –The Naughty Boys –The Eastern Passage -60s Music

Standard
Clippings of –The Naughty Boys  –The Eastern Passage -60s Music

CLIPPED FROMThe Ottawa CitizenOttawa, Ontario, Canada02 Dec 1966, Fri

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Dec 1966, Fri

Married to Bob Gauthier —Since November 18, 1972

I met him months after the band broke up.in December 1970. But most of them remained friends after. ( Elaine Gauthier) Thanks to Elaine and Bob Gauthier for sending me these clippings.

Those Naughty Boys

Profile:

More than any other SJA act, Those Naughty Boys were the epitome of the garage band. In 1965, Bobby Gauthier got expelled from high school for letting his hair grow past his collar. Shortly after this, he got a bunch of teenagers with little or no prior musical knowledge together and formed a group. After only a few practices, they booked some time at H.H. Bloom Studios and cut their first demo. With the help of former Esquires roadie Don Nicholson as manager, they landed a recording contract with Montreal-based Fantastic Records, much to the surprise of some of their rivals. Their first single, “Baby,” was issued during the winter of 1966, thus establishing them on the scene. They gigged constantly throughout much of the year and regularly toured remote parts of north-eastern Ontario and western Quebec. During such a tour, their van cart-wheeled off the highway, while en route to a date in Maniwaki. They survived uninjured and told the tale the following week when they were interviewed on CJOH-TV’s Saturday Date. Being enterprising young men, they invested their earnings in their own Club 400, in Cornwall, Ontario, booking all the major touring acts from Ottawa and Montreal into it. By the time their Sir John A. single came out, the group was on the verge of splitting up. Gauthier had strained his vocal cords and couldn’t sing. As the band was booked solid for the next three months, they hired former Eyes Of Dawn frontman, Wayne McQuaid to take over the lead vocals. But the constant touring had taken its toll and dissension was rife. Gauthier had turned down several offers from a little known group called The In-Sect, but once The Naughty Boys’ commitments had been fulfilled, in April, he accepted and renamed them The Eastern Passage.

Thanks to Elaine and Bob Gauthier for sending me these clippings.

More than any other SJA act, Those Naughty Boys were the epitome of the garage band. In 1965, Bobby Gauthier got expelled from high school for letting his hair grow past his collar. Shortly after this, he got a bunch of teenagers with little or no prior musical knowledge together and formed a group. After only a few practices, they booked some time at H.H. Bloom Studios and cut their first demo. With the help of former Esquires roadie Don Nicholson as manager, they landed a recording contract with Montréal-based Fantastic Records, much to the surprise of some of their rivals.

Their first single, “Baby,” was issued during the winter of 1966, thus establishing them on the scene. They gigged constantly throughout much of the year and regularly toured remote parts of north-eastern Ontario and western Québec. During such a tour, their van cart-wheeled off the highway, while en route to a date in Maniwaki. They survived uninjured and told the tale the following week when they were interviewed on CJOH-TV’s Saturday Date. Being enterprising young men, they invested their earnings in their own Club 400, in Cornwall, Ontario, booking all the major touring acts from Ottawa and Montréal into it. By the time their Sir John A. single came out, the group was on the verge of splitting up. Gauthier had strained his vocal cords and couldn’t sing. As the band was booked solid for the next three months, they hired former Eyes Of Dawn frontman, Wayne McQuaid to take over the lead vocals. But the constant touring had taken its toll and dissension was rife. Gauthier had turned down several offers from a little known group called The In-Sect, but once The Naughty Boys’ commitments had been fulfilled, in April, he accepted and renamed them The Eastern Passage. CLICK HERE

Bob GauthierLost Ottawa
December 15, 2013  ·  Lost Ottawa
On the roof of Freiman’s Dept Store 1967 looking down on Rideau St.

The photo on the roof on Rideau St was on the roof of Freimans Dept Store.  We snuck up a fire escape and the photographer that helped us trespass was an RCMP Officer who my sister was dating at the time!-I am the one that is holding on for dear life at the front with my fingers- I was about 16.

Cheers,

Bob Gauthier

Skip Layton–Don Billows, who owned ‘The Oak Door’ on Bank St., managed this band.

Those Naughty Boys – Tell Me Why b/w Somebody Told My Girl

Format: 45
Label: Sir John A RG 1020
Year: 1967
Origin: Ottawa, Ontario
Genre: garage
Keyword: 
Value of Original Title: $400.00
Make Inquiry/purchase: email ryder@robertwilliston.com
Release Type: Singles
Websites:  No
Playlist: OntarioThe GarageRock Room1960’sSir John A Records

CLICK here

Frpm Jim Hurcumb’s Book-Rockin’ On The Rideau: Ottawa’s Golden Age of Rock and Roll BUY HERE CLICK

Thanks to Elaine and Bob Gauthier for sending me these clippings.

Photos- Thanks to Elaine and Bob Gauthier for sending me these clippings.

Thanks to Elaine and Bob Gauthier for sending me these clippings.

The Canadian Beatles aka The Beavers- Mike Duffy was their Road Manager –Bands of the 60s

Saturday Date with “Thee Deuce” in Almonte

Dance Hall Days with The Coachmen
The Coachmen Return!!! Born to be Wild Circa 1985

The Day I Tried to Long Tall Sally Paul McCartney

Kindle Fire Minutes of “Dancin the Feelin“ with James Brown

Music in the 60s- Memories of Herman’s Hermits

Back to The Future — Twisting Your Dignity Away

Vintage Music stories

Musical Notes About the Rosetta Violin

The Heirlooms- Ferguson Violin

Dueling Shoes and Fiddles and Step Dancing Contest July 15 1974

Notes of Lanark County Dances and Fiddlers

Good Old Lanark County Music–From the 70s to now

Fiddling in Lanark County by David Ennis

Lanark County Dance Halls 1950s, 60s & 70s

Fiddler’s Hill— Where the Green Grass Doesn’t Grow in Lanark

A Musical Thief– Hector G. Dallimore and Isobel Brown

Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

Standard
Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

1. Easter Bunny Cake recipe (1950)

1953 Easter egg cake recipe

A feather in your Easter bonnet — this luscious Easter bunny cake… Best cake you’ve baked in a month of Easter Sundays… and you… yes, you… can take all the glory!

Ingredients

1/2 cup Dexo (shortening)
2-1/4 cups sifted cake flour
3 teaspoons double-action baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1% cups sugar
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs, unbeaten

Directions

Measure shortening into bowl. Sift dry ingredients onto shortening. Add vanilla to milk. Add 2/3 of the milk.

Blend and beat 1 minute (count at least 150 strokes per minute). Add remaining 1/3 milk. Add eggs. Beat 2 minutes. Bake in two greased and floured deep 8-inch layer pans in moderate oven, 375° F for 25 to 30 minutes.

When cool, frost with butter frosting. Color coconut green, using vegetable coloring. Place on top of cake.

Arrange Easter candy bunny on coconut. Decorate with colored jelly beans.

Vintage Easter bunny cake recipe from 1950

Bake Swan’s Down Yellow Cake Mix in two 8-inch layers, following directions on package. Make Easy Chocolate Frosting, using the recipe on the back of the blue and yellow package of Baker’s Unsweetened Chocolate.

1. Cut each cake layer in two, about 1/4-inch off-center. This will make two large and two smaller pieces.

2. Place these four pieces together with frosting between them, the smaller pieces on the outside. Stand them upright, cut sides down, on a cake plate.

3. Trim the outside pieces at the top outer edges to help round off sides of cake for egg shape.

4. Then trim off lower ends of outside pieces, slicing diagonally, to give cake an oval shape at base.

Cover the whole mound with remaining frosting, filling in to make an egg shape. Decorate with white and tinted frosting and jelly beans. Make a nest of green-tinted Baker’s Coconut around egg. To serve, cut across the egg, making four-layer slices of cake.

When I go to a family reunion, or maybe church homecoming, THIS is the type of Coconut Cake I want to see on the dessert table.  One look, and you can tell it was made by a dear, older Mother or Grandmother, that’s been baking for years.  Sure, she wants it to look good, but she’s more concerned about how it tastes.

There might have been a day, years ago, when she could make her cake look like something in a bakery window.  Now, the years have taken a toll on her body.  Her hands shake a bit these days, as she adjusts layers and spreads the icing.  Her legs just don’t have the strength to stand at her table, and work and fuss with it like she once did. She has to take frequent breaks lately, just to rest awhile, so she can work on it a little bit more.

As a young child, she learned how to make this cake standing beside her own mother.  She’s never used a recipe, but now, her mind continues to wonder if she’s somehow forgotten a key ingredient.

All through the years, she’s heard people talk about how great her cakes are.  She just smiles, often looking downward as if embarrassed, but her heart is made happy as she tenderly says, “Thank You.”

Out the corner of their eye, everybody seems to watch when they realize her cake is being brought in. Some even strain their neck a bit, to see exactly where it gets placed among the others on the long table. You know hers will be the first empty cake plate on that table, and you have already schemed up a plan to get a slice.  Heaven forbid if someone should take the last piece before you get yours.

My mother made a great Coconut Cake, one that was similar to this one. Her icing was more of a clear type and you could clearly see the layers beneath that frosting and the layer of coconut spread on top. In the earlier years, she always used a fresh coconut, grating it by hand. She would always hand me the small leftover pieces that she didn’t grate, and that was like pure candy in my book.

Cake Ingredients: Sungold Coconut Cake

  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 1 cup Butter, at room temperature
  • 4 Eggs, separated
  • 1 cup Evaporated Milk
  • 3 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 3 teaspoons Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • Pinch of Salt

Coconut Cream Icing

  • 3 cups Coconut
  • 3 cups Confectioners’ Sugar
  • 8 Tablespoons Heavy Cream, approximately.
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350ºF.

  1. Place flour, baking powder, and pinch of salt, in a sifter.
  2. Sift three times. Set aside.
  3. Place butter in a large mixing bowl.
  4. Add Sugar.
  5. Beat butter and sugar to a smooth cream consistency.
  6. Separate the egg yolks from the whites, set whites aside.
  7. Beat the egg yolks well.
  8. Add egg yolks to the butter and sugar mixture and beat until very light.
  9. Add the sifted flour, alternating with the milk, to the first mixture, mix to combine.
  10. Beat the egg whites to a stiff froth.
  11. Add the vanilla extract to the batter mixture.
  12. Gently fold in the egg whites to the batter.
  13. Butter and flour two 9 inch cake layer pans.
  14. Divide the batter between the two pans.
  15. Bake at 350ºF for 20-25 minutes, or until done.
  16. Insert a wooden toothpick or skewer in the center of the baked layer. If it pulls out clean, cake is done.
  17. Remove from oven, place on a wire rack, let cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan.
  18. Let layers cool completely.
  19. Prepare layers as desired before frosting.

To Make The Icing and Assemble The Cake

  1. Place sugar in a medium size mixing bowl.
  2. Add the cream, a little at a time, beating steadily.
  3. Add Vanilla.
  4. When icing is of the right consistency, spread over the top of the layer.
  5. Sprinkle a good layer of coconut on top of layer.
  6. Repeat with the next layer.
  7. Ice the final layer and sides of the cake.
  8. Cover the entire cake with remaining coconut.
  9. Serve and Enjoy!

ow to make an Easter Bunny cake:

This is a cake that my mom used to make for us on Easter Saturday from a pattern she found in a magazine back in the early 70’s. It’s simple and clever: one round cake serves as the bunny face and two simple slices in a second cake create the ears and a bow tie. You then frost, cover the imperfections with coconut (that’s what I do), and decorate with goodies.

Bunny cake diagram

This is the diagram from the old magazine clipping.

Bunny cake diagram


Mom used to frost the cake with boiled icing which looks lovely and bunny-like. I haven’t yet learned to make boiled frosting so use a simple white frosting instead. You’ll need a good 4 cups of icing to ice the cake.

Make your bunny cake with this molasses devil’s food cake

Easy creamy icing

1/4 cup soft butter

3 Tbsp milk

1 tsp vanilla

3-4 cups of icing sugar

Cream the butter with the milk and vanilla. Add the icing sugar one cup at a time until you get a spreadable consistency.

**You’ll need to double the recipe to fully frost a layer cake.

Related reading

‘Pet De Soeurs’ or Nun’s Pastries

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

Gluten Free–

Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Pastry Chef Ben White

“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies