Tag Archives: 1969

January 29, 1969 — Railroad Crash Highway 29

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January 29, 1969 — Railroad Crash Highway 29

Ottawa Citizen 23 January 1969

Ottawa Citizen 22 January 1969 – HIghway 29 between Carleton Place and Almonte

CARLETON PLACE  Attempts to clear the $500,000 wreckage of 34 freight cars piled up at a level crossing near here Tuesday continued this morning under the threat of an explosion from two overturned propane gas tankers.

Provincial police kept guard over the area, about three miles north of here on Highway 29 at the CPR crossing, as about 50 men and two giant cranes hauled twisted box cars from the clogged line.

The highway remained closed to traffic today while other trains were rerouted.

The two tankers were not ruptured in the massive 3.30 p.m. derailment, but police kept hundreds of curious spectators well back from the scene in the event leaking gas might explode.

Both police and railway officials were astonished that there had been no injuries.

One of the first cars to derail left the tracks just before the level crossing and sliced across the highway only a few feet in front of a waiting school bus. Box  cars stacked up.

Other cars ripped up sections of the highway, railway lines and wooden ties as they piled up, and in some cases, landed on top of one another. One freight car landed with its steel wheels on top of a tanker.Two hydro poles were sliced through by other cars. The top section of some pole was left dangling over the line supported only by the high-voltage cables.Complete wheel assemblies of many cars were torn off as they piled into one another and lay strewn along the tracks among sections of line, twisted cars and splintered ties.

Ottawa Citizen 23 January 1969

Train Crash Theory – Wheel is Blamed

A crack which caused the leading wheel of either the fourth or fifth car to come off is believed to be to blame for the $500,000 freight train crash near Carleton Place yesterday.

It is known that at least eight rails between Almonte and the accident scene were broken.

This could have been caused by the faulty wheel running out of line and pounding against the rail as the east bound train headed for Carleton Place, said one railway employee.

The 60-car freight train left Chalk River several hours before. Its speed at the time of the accident was estimated to be about 45 m.p.h.

George G. Sayer, assistant superintendent for the Smiths Falls division of CPR, said work crews were concentrating their efforts to pulling cars away from the tracks and repairing breaks so regular traffic, which had been diverted to other lines, could again travel the main line.

Mr. Sayer said he hoped the two cranes, one brought in from Smiths Falls and the other from Sudbury, could pull the two tankers back on to the tracks and pull them away by sometime this afternoon.

One eye-witness, Bill Ritchie, 32, a Bell Telephone employee from Almonte, was driving north toward the level crossing when he saw the red signal lights begin flashing.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
23 Jan 1969, Thu  •  Page 10

“I saw the train swaying so I stopped about 500 feet from the tracks,” he said. “The next thing I saw were freight cars flying through the air like cardboard boxes in a high wind. It was terrifying.”

He said a couple of cars shot across the highway “while the others piled up on the north side like magazines thrown on the floor.”

“There was a hell of a crash and snow flying in the air. A lot landed on my truck so I jumped out and after a minute or two ran up to the tracks. I thought people would be hurt,” said Mr.Ritchie.

He said that by the time he got there, people from the locomotive, that had shot through the crossing pulling three cars and dragging a fourth without wheels, met him.

“One box car just missed the school bus, which luckily didn’t have any children aboard, and another cut into the hydro poles and the warning flashers,” said Mr. Richie.

“There was a ball of fire in the sky when one hydro pole was cut off,” said Mr. Ritchie, who added that he and a work-mate then flagged down cars until police arrive.

Almonte Gazette January 1969

The remains of five torn and twisted box cars stall lie scattered about at the scene of the spectacular train wreck which occurred at tile half-way crossing between Almonte and Carleton Place on Tuesday. Clean-up crews of the C.P.R. Mechanical Department estimates it will take another week to clear the area of the remaining debris. They are now in the process of burning out the wooden interiors of the boxcars, following which they will be cut up with torches and hauled away.

A broken wheel apparently spread the track at about eight foot intervals for the entire distance and trains have been on a go-slow order along that stretch since rail traffic was resumed the day following the accident. A telegraph pole beside the crossing which had the bottom portion sheared off leaving the top dangling on its wares has yet to be replaced. Traffic on Highway 29 was disrupted for several days while heavy cranes removed most of the 30 cars which left the rails during the pileup and had to be rerouted along the 8th line and the Appleton road. Marks are clearly visible where derailed box cars rolled across the highway adjacent to the crossing gouging deep ruts in the asphalt. Some are even evident several feet back of the white line on the south side of the track where vehicle traffic is required to stop. Occupants of a car and a Bell Telephone truck who witnessed the derailment from that location were fortunate they had stopped well short of the crossing

Related reading

Did You Know About These Local Train Wrecks?

James Fanning– Robert Nolan– Train Accident

When Trains Crash —Ashton Train Accident 1950

Clippings of The Old Perth Train Station

The Glen Tay Train Wrecks of Lanark County

Memories of 1969 Carol McDonald —Janine McDonald Azzouz

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Memories of 1969 Carol McDonald —Janine McDonald Azzouz

Hi Linda, my mom, Carol McDonald, found this flyer while going through paperwork today. Just wanted to add it to your history collection!--Janine McDonald Azzouz

I was inspired by your house comparison photos lately and looked up the photos of my grandparents’ house. This house is located at 190 Morphy St. It was built by my Grandpa – Desmond Moore in 1949. His father James Moore helped to clear the land and dig the basement. Desmond and Jean Moore raised their four girls in this little house – even having my great grandmother (Granny Shane) move in with them for many years! In the photo you can see Des Moore and two of his daughters – Carol McDonald and Donna Marjerrison. They owned the house until 2013 after my Grandma passed away. The “recent” photo is from 2013 when my grandma still tended to the flowers at the front of the house.

-Janine McDonald Azzouz

Train Wreck January 21, 1969– Almonte Gazette

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Train Wreck January 21, 1969– Almonte Gazette
Almonte Gazette

The remains of five twisted box cars stall lie scattered about at the scene of the spectacular train wreck which occurred at tile half-way crossing between Almonte and Garleton Place on Tuesday. Clean-up crews of the C.P.R. Mechanical Department estimate it will take another week to clear the area of the remaining debris.

They are now in the process of burning out the wooden interiors of the boxcars, following which they will be cut up with torches and hauled away. Meanwhile, another crew is busy replacing, all the rails on the east side of the track from the halfway crossing all the way back to Almonte. A broken wheel apparently spread the track at about eight foot intervals for the entire distance and trains have been on a go-slow order along that stretch since rail traffic was resumed the day following the accident.

A telegraph pole beside the crossing which had the bottom portion sheared off leaving the top dangling on its wares has yet to be replaced. Traffic on Highway 29 was disrupted for several days while heavy cranes removed most of the 30 cars which left the rails during the pileup and had to be rerouted along the 8th line and the Appleton road. Marks are clearly visible where derailed box cars rolled across the highway adjacent to the crossing gouging deep ruts in the asphalt. Some are even evident several feet back of the white line on the south side of the track where vehicle traffic is required to stop. Occupants of a car and a Bell Telephone truck who witnessed the derailment from that location were fortunate they had stopped well short of the crossing.

Ottawa Citizen 22 January 1969


CARLETON PLACE  Attempts to clear the $500,000 wreckage of 34 freight cars piled up at a level crossing near here Tuesday continued this morning under the threat of an explosion from two overturned propane gas tankers.


Provincial police kept guard over the area, about three miles north of here on Highway 29 at the CPR crossing, as about 50 men and two giant cranes hauled twisted box cars from the clogged line.
The highway remained closed to traffic today while other trains were rerouted.

The two tankers were not ruptured in the massive 3.30 p.m. derailment, but police kept hundreds of curious spectators well back from the scene in the event leaking gas might explode. Both police and railway officials were astonished that there had been no injuries. One of the first cars to derail left the tracks just before the level crossing and sliced across the highway only a few feet in front of a waiting school bus.

Other cars ripped up sections of the highway, railway lines and wooden ties as they piled up, and in some cases, landed on top of one another. One freight car landed with its steel wheels on top of a tanker.
Two hydro poles were sliced through by other cars. The top section of one pole was left dangling over the line supported only by the high-voltage cables. Complete wheel assemblies of many cars were torn off as they piled into one another and lay strewn along the tracks among sections of line, twisted cars and splintered ties.

A crack which caused the leading wheel of either the fourth or fifth car to come off is believed to be to blame for the $500,000 freight train crash near Carleton Place yesterday. It is known that at least eight rails between Almonte and the accident scene were broken.

Photo from the Carleton Place Canadian from the Wanda Lee Morrison and the late Joan Kehoe collection.



This could have been caused by the faulty wheel running out of line and pounding against the rail as the east bound train headed for Carleton Place, said one railway employee. The 60-car freight train left Chalk River several hours before. Its speed at the time of the accident was estimated to be about 45 m.p.h. George G. Sayer, assistant superintendent for the Smiths Falls division of CPR, said work crews were concentrating their efforts to pulling cars away from the tracks and repairing breaks so regular traffic, which had been diverted to other lines, could again travel the main line.


Mr. Sayer said he hoped the two cranes, one brought in from Smiths Falls and the other from Sudbury, could pull the two tankers back on to the tracks and pull them away by sometime this afternoon.

“The line should be open again by about 5 p.m. today,” he said, adding that the general freight being carried by the train could then be hauled away and the other cars righted and moved later this week.


Mr. Sayer said there was, as far as he could tell, little damage to the cargo. One eye-witness, Bill Ritchie, 32, a Bell Telephone employee from Almonte, was driving north toward the level crossing when he saw the red signal lights begin flashing.


“I saw the train swaying so I stopped about 500 feet from the tracks,” he said. “The next thing I saw were freight cars flying through the air like cardboard boxes in a high wind. It was terrifying.”
He said a couple of cars shot across the highway “while the others piled up on the north side like magazines thrown on the floor.”


“There was a hell of a crash and snow flying in the air. A lot landed on my truck so I jumped out and after a minute or two ran up to the tracks. I thought people would be hurt,” said Mr.Ritchie.
He said that by the time he got there, people from the locomotive, that had shot through the crossing pulling three cars and dragging a fourth without wheels, met him.


“One box car just missed the school bus, which luckily didn’t have any children aboard, and another cut into the hydro poles and the warning flashers,” said Mr. Richie.
“There was a ball of fire in the sky when one hydro pole was cut off,” said Mr. Ritchie, who added that he and a work-mate then flagged down cars until police arrived.

ADHS 1969 Honours List

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ADHS 1969 Honours List
adhs 1969

Students from the Almonte District High School received their first term reports on Wednesday, January 22nd. These reports were an evaluation of the students’ progress based on first term classroom work from September to December, and the December examinations.

Mr. Sweeney reported to the Gazette that excellent results were achieved in almost all areas. Fifty-five students achieved mi average of 75 per cent or better when the averages of all subjects were considered. These students have been placed on the Honour Roll and their names are listed below.

Mr. Sweeney also reported that an average of 89 per cent of the subjects taken were passed by the student body. He said that Almonte District High School students have fine potential to produce out- – standing results in June, with a large number of the graduating students in all programmes achieving Honours standing.

Honours List —The following students achieved an overall average of 74.5 per cent or better: 9A — Lynn Fulton, Dana Mitchell. 9b — Charlene Payne, Marlene Sauermann, Sherry Blakeley. 9C — Lee Fulton, Karen Mills, John Argue. 9D — Barbara Boal, Joan Lalonde, Ronald Cameron. 9E—Tommy Payne. 10A — Brenda Acres, Maureen Dunn, Nancy Giles, Paul Smolkin, Lee Stewart.

10B — Jean Donaldson, Bev. Sadler, Richard Bekolay. 1OC — Ian Pragnell, Phillip Shaw. I0E — Tony Larose. lOF— Richard Wooldridge. 11 A—-Anne Barr, Susan Bradley, Diane McDonald, Robyn Reid, Vivienne Stewart, William Casey, Michael Fulton, Julian Noad. —Christine Beckett, Brenda Mordy. 11C—Debbie Reid. 11E—Lee Cox. 12A — Marilyn’ Davis, Joanne Wylie, John Bekolay, Gary Giles. 12B—Beverley Holmes. 12D—Linda Findlay. 13A — Brian Chaffee, David Caldwell, Philip Low, Michael McCormick. 13B — Janet Bradley, Kathy Camelon, Karen Donahoe. Catherine Dunn, Linda Gale, Beth James, Carol Ann Sadler, Lea Ann Weiler, Cheri Warwick.

Colliding Into the IGA — Carleton Place

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Colliding Into the IGA — Carleton Place

 

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In January of 1969 two cars were badly damaged and part of the IGA storefront was damaged. The IGA store suffered considerable damage as one of the vehicles ploughed into the storefront but thankfully was stopped by a steel window post.

The car of D. L. Linton was parked on the west side of Bridge Street just north of Albert. He was pulling away from the curb when his car was struck almost centre by another car also proceeding south and driven by Gerald Stearns.

Force of the collision carried the McLinton car sideways and it went into the centre window of the IGA store. Both vehicles were very badly damaged. Mr. McLinton was taken to the  hospital by the Alan R. Barker ambulance and treated for minor injuries.

Beside the large plate glass window in the IGA, damage included destruction of a section of concrete shelf inside the window, part of a concrete slab shelving and exterior brickwork from ground level to the window.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

The Old Grocery Counter –Calvin Moore

Did You Know Who was Cooking in Back of Lancaster’s Grocery Store? Dr. Howard I Presume! – Part 3

Memories and Thoughts of the Grocery Store

Dishing up the Memories of The Devlins

Glory Days of Carleton Place–Mike Kean

Memories of Ruth Ferguson

Where’s the Beef in Carleton Place?

Name That Carleton Place Butcher? FOUND!!!

Memories of Argue’s Food Market?

The Days of the Loosey Cigarette, Slinky and Mailing a Letter

In Memory of Mickey Pickup– Carleton Place Dominion Store

The Writing on the Wall Disappeared but the Memories Don’t

Number Two’s Try Harder?

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I can’t post some newspaper articles on Facebook as you would never be able to read them. So here is one I thought everyone would enjoy.

Rod Snedden, age 21, of 118 High Street, Carleton Place said he was driving around Carleton Place with his fiance Anne Wylie when they heard the winning tickets from the Ottawa Exhibition attendance draw on the radio. That day in 1969 he finally heard the winning numbers and wasted no time speeding to Ottawa and the Exhibition grounds before the 11.p.m cutoff time.

The engaged couple had visited the annual fair for a couple of hours the first Saturday it was open. Mr. Snedden was a junior technician with an Ottawa engineering firm and had never won anything before.

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 Sep 1969, Tue,  Page 3

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading

 

 

The Publicity Club Coupon Contest of Smiths Falls 1931

Carleton Place 1940’s —- The Popularity Contest

Win a House in Carleton Place!

 

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Just Beat it! The Carnival Riot of 1969–Newspaper Articles

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Just Beat it! The Carnival Riot of 1969–Newspaper Articles

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If you read the article I wrote last year with information from Duncan Rogers Carleton Place was abuzz with hoses and fireman and fighting teenagers and carnival workers. Click here–Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place

Today  I found the newspaper articles

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal14 Jul 1969, MonPage 1

 

 

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Those Dirty Hippies!

Woodstock in Carleton Place Letters — Go Back to Your Holes!

Woodstock in Carleton Place– Let the Tambourines Play and — And About That Junk Pile!