Tag Archives: 1930s

Taxi Rides –Beer Rides 1930’s and Local Taxi Driver “Kid (Norman) Bryce”

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Taxi Rides –Beer Rides 1930’s and Local Taxi Driver “Kid (Norman) Bryce”
Mademoiselle Decourcelle. The world’s first woman taxi driver, dressed in uniform, circa 1909

July 1939

As soon as hotels in Perth and Smiths Falls secure licence to sell beer and wine local taxi drivers will inaugurate a cheap nightly service from Almonte to those places it is understood. Word that no licences would be granted in Almonte or Carleton Place because of local option came as disappointment to thirsty people who had looked forward to beer by the glass in these towns.

Drivers of cars on the other hand, stand to benefit under the government’s ruling and will run a regular service to neighbouring towns as soon as the hotels open their beverage rooms. Whether the Premier will find some way of preventing these Almonte and Carleton Place commuters from patronizing hotels in other places remains to be seen. No representations have been made to him on that score up to the present time though it is possible something may be done about the situation in the near future. Local bootleggers, it is said, were overjoyed at the news that they were not going to have legitimate competition.

Almonte Taxi’s

memories of Almonte– Johnson’s Taxi– 1950s–Sandy France said “Don Johnson was the taxi driver in the early 50’s. Think he may have been an ex serviceman”

Linda Beaupre asks:Hello Linda, new member here. My mother’s family had cousins or uncles in the Almonte area the used to run a taxi service out of their home . I was wondering if you had any info on them , last name was Majaury and it was in the 60s?Anyone? Thank you!!

Don RaycroftYes, we used them when it was really cold to go to school. If you didn’t call them they would pick you up on the way if they thought it was too cold to be walking. Nice people.

Mary HurdisMargret and Jimmy Majaury had a taxi service.She loved chocolate and beer! He was related to my husband, his mother was Margaret Majaury. Try texting Elizabeth Dennie her mother was a sister of James if not I have a Majaury book

Laurie LadouceurThey lived at 49 Carleton street on the Island. My family is related. We purchased the house from them. We lived there for awhile

Taxi service in Carleton Place– Kid Bryce ( Norman)

January 1934
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Mar 1941, Sat  •  Page 32

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
30 Sep 1930, Tue  •  Page 13

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
01 Sep 1947, Mon  •  Page 15

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Jan 1994, Mon  •  Page 34

Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business. It was well known all around town that Mr. Stanzel had a pet skunk and and a pet raccoon as well. No word if they came for rides in his taxi!

Murray’s Taxi —- Frank Blakeley and other Rides

Walton’s Taxi and Did a Plane Really Land on Bridge Street? College and Bridge Street

Looking for Memories of Kennedy’s Taxi

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place –Part 1–Bud’s Taxi

Personal Memories of Downtown Local Business etc.

Did you Know? Bet You Didn’t!

. Mr. Graham who once lived here served in the War, worked for CPR and offered a Taxi Service to the town and lived in the little yellow house–…(Nichols) on Bridge Street

Ray Paquette’s Carleton Place Moment..-In the right corner of the advertisement for Howard McNeely’s Barber Shop, it mentions E. McNeely, Assistant. I wonder if that is Earl McNeely who later or perhaps prior to worked barbering with Howard Little and lived on Munro Street west of Rochester? As well, how many people remember Ned Root’s Shoe Repair beside the driveway for Stanzel’s Taxi?

BEFORE AND AFTER-100-102 BRIDGE STREET CARLETON PLACE–THE FRAME BUILDING WAS MRS. ROGER’S BOARDING HOUSE BEFORE SHE MOVED TO VICTORIA STREET AND THERE WAS A SMALL ADDITION AT THE REAR OF THIS BUILDING. THE BUILDING WAS BRICK AND CLAPBOARD AS THAT WERE USED TO CONSTRUCT MANY OF THE BRIDGE STREET BUILDINGS.
Asa Roe and his family occupied the house for a few year and then Richard Dowdall bought the property. Early in 1936 George Doucett moved his insurance office into one side and Dr. J.A. McEwen had his medical office on the other.
It was thus occupied until the early 1950s when Mr. Dowdall purchased the brick building at Bridge and Emily and moved his business. Walter Stanzel later lived here and operated his taxi business and when Dr. McEwen moved a couple blocks down Bridge Street both sides became dwellings. Penny Trafford mentioned that Mr. Stanzel had a pet skunk and I think a pet raccoon as well.
I remember taking clothing to the tailor that was on the right hand side of this building in the 80s? Last year I heard a story about a local woman who made teddy bears– and is this the same spot she was making them in? Still trying to find out the source of that information. Searching for Information– Teddy Bears Made in Carleton Place?
Ray Paquette added: My parents lived in the right side of the house before moving to an apartment in the Senior Citizen’s site at 126 Sussex Street. The Watty Stanzel ran a taxi service out of the left side for many years and I seem to recall Mrs. Cecil McCann and Ms Eileen Costello living in that side in later years.
Ray PaquetteI’m having a senior moment. Will somebody reminding me who ran Moore’s Taxi please?
Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Ernie Moore – I think.
Ray PaquetteWas that the same Ernie Moore who ran the store on Moore Street?

Nancy HudsonLinda I think the taxi driver’s name was John Moore, Ernie had the store on Moore St.
Ray PaquetteNancy Hudson I remember Watty Stanzel, Arnie McNeely, Ronnie Wing and Wib Giles but John Moore, I have no recollection of. Where did he live?
Nancy HudsonRay Paquette John Moore lived at the corner of Town Line west and Moffatt St. My Aunt and Uncle, Les and Olive Nield lived next door to him on Moffatt St

Ray PaquetteLinda Gallipeau-Johnston Ted has taken on the affectation of 2 “d’s” in his name. He is now known as Tedd. Go figure?!?!?
Doug B. McCartenRay Paquette great to see Brian and Tedd are well and enjoying life as retirees! Ask Brian if he remembers the two young ladies who were traveling through town selling magazine subscriptions? We all went back to Brian’s house to discuss our choices….. lol! I actually got a subscription for Car & Driver….. I think Brian took one of the ladies to his room to get money or something BAHAHAHA what a nice visit we had with them…….
Ray PaquetteDoug B. McCarten I sent your comment regarding the magazine sales staff to Brian who commented “…You can tell Doug that , although that little experience had slipped my mind, yes I do remember now that he mentioned it. I thought that there might have been a third guy involved but I might be wrong. I ended up getting a subscription for a year to a magazine I cared little for.Those girls were VERY good at their job.”

Ray PaquetteThere are a lot of commercial locations of earlier times that are not included on this “place mat”. Bellamy’s Restaurant, Sinclair Bros. Men’s Wear and Patterson’s Furniture to mention a few others not already noted above. I could go on but would bore most readers…
Joan StoddartRemember the rest rooms beside the Queen’s

It’s Okay to Date a Student — Ella Deweiller and Charles Bauer– 1930s — Now You Know the Rest of the Story…..

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It’s Okay to Date a Student — Ella Deweiller and Charles Bauer– 1930s — Now You Know the Rest of the Story…..
1930

In my search for something else I came across a teacher dating her student in the 1930s. Schools in the big cities were better off than rural schools during the Great Depression, but they still had problems. Schools had less money, which meant fewer teachers, and teachers were paid less. New supplies and books could not be bought for students, and classes like PE, art, and music were taken out of schools. In most cases a student was barely a few years older than her students in a rural school like New Boston that had a poplulation of 736 in 1930.

There were rules for teachers and in the 1920s you were not supposed to marry or fraternise with your students. I assume they had lightened up, but here was Miss Ella Deweiller dating a high school senior, Charles Bauer, (name wrong in newspaper) who was younger than her.

She was fired of course and it took until 1936 to get her back pay back. In 1932 Ella married Charles Bauer on Christmas Day, and in the 1940 Census they were still together with two children. It looks like he went to first year college and then took a job as a salesclerk as a baby was probably on the way.

Now you know the rest of the story….

Nov 20, 1936
CLIPPED FROM
The Daily Times
Davenport, Iowa
27 Dec 1932, Tue  •  Page 8

CLIPPED FROM
The Star Press
Muncie, Indiana
16 Aug 1936, Sun  •  Page 14
New Boston High School Building 1922 – 1956

Name:Charles Bauer
Gender:Male
Residence Date:Abt 1932
Residence Place:New Boston
Graduation Date:1930
School:New Boston High School
Marriage Date:25 Dec 1932
Father:Fred Bauer
Mother:Bauer
Spouse:Ella Detweiler
Name:Miss Ella Detweiler[Miss Ella Bauer]
Gender:Female
Residence Date:Abt 1932
Residence Place:Eureka
Occupation:Taught
Employer:New Boston High School
School:Sterling High School
Marriage Date:25 Dec 1932
Father:E. R. Detweiler
Mother:Detweiler
Spouse:Charles Bauer
Siblings:Howard DetweilerAline Detwiler

DetailSource 1940 Census

Name:Charles M Bauer[Charles M Baner]
Age:29
Estimated Birth Year:abt 1911
Gender:Male
Race:White
Birthplace:Illinois
Marital Status:Married
Relation to Head of House:Head
Home in 1940:Proviso, Cook, Illinois
Map of Home in 1940:Proviso, Cook, Illinois
Street:Hannah Avenue
House Number:425 Rear
Farm:No
Inferred Residence in 1935:Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Residence in 1935:Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Resident on farm in 1935:No
Sheet Number:14A
Number of Household in Order of Visitation:292
Occupation:Clerk Sales
House Owned or Rented:Rented
Value of Home or Monthly Rental if Rented:25
Attended School or College:No
Highest Grade Completed:College, 1st year
Hours Worked Week Prior to Census:40
Class of Worker:Wage or salary worker in private work
Weeks Worked in 1939:52
Income:1500
Income Other Sources:No
Neighbours:View others on page
Household MembersAgeRelationshipCharles M Bauer29HeadElla D Bauer32WifeBarbara Bauer6DaughterRichard Bauer3Son

Photo of their daughter Barbara who they listed her last name is Baner and not Bauer

U.S., School Yearbooks, 1900-1999
Detail
Related
Source
Name
Barbara Baner/Bauer
Estimated Age
Abt 16
Birth Year
1934
Yearbook Date
1950
School
Eureka High School
School Location
Eureka, Illinois, USA

Did You Know This? “The Rest of the Story”

Private Norman Turner and Leslie Owrid — The Rest of the Story

The Carleton Place Affiliation to the Titanic — The Rest of the Story

Lily Roberts of Drummond The Rest of the Story

Digging Up the Other Stories… the Rest of the Story

The Faces On the Almonte Steps–the Rest of the Story

Marjorie and Charlie Rintoul–The Rest of the Story– Thanks to Norma Ford

Did You Know This? “The Rest of the Story”

For the Love of Laura Secord — The Rest of the Story

The Story of John Montreuil’s Hoosier Cabinet

Hair Attention — Noreen Tyers

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Hair Attention — Noreen Tyers

This was called Hair Attention if you were going to something special.

When we were young girls, a special occasion came up attention was given to your hair. Usually Saturdays were bath and hair washing day, and when you lived with no hot water, it was a challenge to my Mom to get us “cleaned up and presentable” as she would say. She would boil the kettle on the old coal stove and then wash our hair in the kitchen sink, yes the water was cooled. I can tell you complaining was not permitted.

Now hair brushing was done every evening before bed, one hundred strokes and for goodness sake, do not forget where you were at or you started over at one again. There were times when I did wonder if I had any hair left on my head. My Mom had two other sayings and there was no sense complaining as they when they were repeated time to time, you just knew to keep your mouth buttoned up. Her two favourite sayings were, “You Know Cleanliness is next to Godliness” the other one was, “You can’t make a Silk Purse out of a Sow’s Ear.” In other words, just grin and bear it, and accept the Words of Wisdom.

If it was a particular, special occasion, she would decide to put ringlets in your hair, oh dear I did not like ringlets, I was no prissy, princess, and that was for sure. This was a chore, she would patiently divide your hair, it had to be even, the right amounts of ringlets. I do think there were times in order to save time the ringlets would be larger, you know you would get fewer ringlets but they would be fatter. In some ways that was better as it took less time and suffering, it was a chore.Do not think that is the end of the hair treatment, Oh No, there was another step to this mission. First of all my Mom would have cut some strips of material maybe a House Dress that was worn thin in spots, and into lengths it would be cut. We would then wrap some hair around her finger and make a ringlet, a bobby pin was inserted to hold. Then we would wrap the ringlet with the strip of material. This would happen with every ringlet.

Now for a young child the whole deal was an evening job, and if both Grace and I had to be done, by the end of the second child the nerves could be frayed, the feet tired and the finger was exhausted of being in that ringlet position. Oh I hope I am first tonight, as it pulls a bit if Mom was tired. For some reason after each ringlet was made, it was patted and pressed up against your head. You know there you go, ringlets made, rags in and patted it up against the head. Your head was exhausted, and then another statement would come out “PRIDE PINCHES’‘. You have to know it was not my pride it was my mother’s pride, and she waited for the compliments on how the daughter’s hairs, looked, just look at the shine. If you only knew what it took, the curls, the brushing. Personally speaking, I did not care. Have you ever tried to rest your head on the pillow with a bunch of lumpy rags attached? UNCOMFORTABLE! Just to let you know with the rags in your hair, it was lumpy sleeping and a good night’s rest you did not get.

Lines From the ✒ of NoreenAugust 14/2021

The Handmade Tablecloth — Noreen Tyers

Cutting a Christmas Tree at the House of Old at R. R. # 4 — Noreen Tyers

Making the Fudge for that Special School Affair 1940s Noreen Tyers

The Teeter Totter Incident Noreen Tyers

Childhood Movie Nights at Reliance Motor Court in Eastview — Noreen Tyers

Hats, Ogilvy’s and Gaudy Teenage Years — Noreen Tyers

Sending Thoughts of Winter to You, from my Wee Dog Ruffy Noreen Tyers

A Trip in the Carrying Case– Noreen Tyers

Just Me Growing Up in the Early 1940’s Noreen Tyers

Grandma and the Cute Little Mice– From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Another Broken Bed Incident — Stories from Richards Castle — Noreen Tyers

Lets Play Elevator- Charles Ogilvy Store — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Barbra Ann Scott Doll –Noreen Tyers

Greetings From Ruffy on Groundhog Day Noreen Tyers

That Smell Of The Lanark County SAP Being Processed — Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages — Noreen Tyers

The old Sheepskin Slippers Noreen Tyers

What’s In a Name? Lanark County 101– Or What’s What in 1934

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What’s In a Name? Lanark County 101– Or What’s What in 1934

Lanark was a provincial riding in Ontario, Canada, that was created for the 1934 election. In 1987 there was a minor redistribution and the riding was renamed to Lanark-Renfrew. It was abolished prior to the 1999 election. It was merged into the riding of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke.

In 1933, in an austerity measure to mark the depression times, the province passed an update to the Representation Act that reduced the number of seats in the legislature from 112 to 90. The riding of Lanark was created from parts of Lanark North and Lanark South and consisted of the townships of Beckwith, Bathurst, Burgess North, Dalhousie, Darling, Drummond, Elmsley North, Lanark, Lavant, Montague, Pakenham, Ramsay, Sherbrooke North and Sherbrooke South. It also included the towns of Almonte, Carleton Place, Perth, and Smith’s Falls and the village of Lanark

1934-

W H A T ’S in a Name? Sometimes very little. Scores of townships in On- ” tario are called after old-time members of the Provincial Legislature big frogs in the little political puddles of their day—whose names mean nothing to this generation. Sir John Graves Simcoe, first Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, gave his own name to one of our counties. Lady Simcoe claimed a share in the work; and to this day three of the townships in that county bear the names of her pet spaniel puppies, Tiny, Tay and Flos. •

 But often in the place names of a community there are suggestions of its ” early history and the origin of its pioneers. The Highlanders who settled Glengarry county have left proof of their love for the old land in the names we find there—Lochiel, Dunvegan, Lochinvar, Dalkeith, Athol, Glen Roy and a dozen others. The Highland emigrant never forgot. 

Lowlanders who came to our own country in 1811-1822 for- or fail to renew in Canada the names of shires and streams and towns which they had known a t home. Lanark, county, township and village,—the Tay, the Clyde, Kilmarnock, Clyde Forks, Glen Tay, the Scotch Line, all remind us of the districts in Scotland from which thousands of our first settlers came. But now our townships, for the most part, preserve the names of the great or near-great men then concerned, in their colonial government or their friends. 

BURGESS, probably from the Bishop of Salisbury, school-mate and friend of Prime Minister Addington (Did you know that North Burgess is now part of Tay Valley?) read- McLaren’s Phosphate Mine — BurgessWood Housing– Anglo Canadian Phosphate Company

ELMSLEY, after Hon. John Elmsley, second Chief Justice of Upper Canada;  Read-A Town Called Barbodies–Port Elmsley 101

BECKWITH and MONTAGUE after Commander J. Beckwith and Admiral Sir George Montague who were friends and guests of Earl Dalhousie Quebec during his term as Governor; – Read-The Beckwith McGregors or readThe Barren Lands of Montague?

DARLING, after Col. H. C. Darling, Military Secretary to Lord Dalhousie for whom he made an inspection and report regarding the Perth and Rideau settlements in 1822. By the way, many years ago I was told by one of the ‘oldest inhabitants’ that this township was named in honour of Grace Darling, the heroic lighthouse girl who, alone in her frail skiff, rescued nine sailors from the wrecked schooner, “Forfarshire” in the storm swept North Sea. Every school reader fifty years ago contained the story of that braV’e deed. One would like to : believe that the township owed its name to her; but she was only eight years old when the survey and naming were completed, and the more commonplace explanation must be accepted.  Read-People are Afraid to Work– Jennie Majaury- Darling Township

DRUMMOND—Sir Gordon Drummond was born a t Quebec .where his father was paymaster of the military forces. Sir Gordon entered the army and served with distinction in Holland, Minorca, Egypt and Gibraltar before coming back to Canada in 1813 to take a gallant part in the war against the United States Read-Drummond Centre United Church — and The Ireton Brothers 38 Year Reunion–Names Names Names

SHERBROOKE—Sir John Cope Sherbrooke followed Drummond as Governor. Perhaps in Quebec he might have worked out some peaceful solution of the troubles and conflicts, even then becoming acute, between the French Canadians, and the British minority there. But the shuffling policy of the British Colonies office convinced him that the task was hard, and his failing health hastened his resignation.  Read-What’s Happening at Christie Lake June 23, 1899

LAVANT—Sherbrooke was succeeded as Governor by the Duke of Richmond. Richmond Village, the Goodwood river (commonly known as the “Jock”) and the townships of Fitzroy, March and Torbolton in Carleton county get their names from the Duke’s family or estates, and our township of Lavant recalls a village near the Goodwood racetrack on the Duke’s estate in Sussex, England. Read-The Lavant Station Fire 1939

Driving between Ottawa and Franktown one passes a cairn on the roadside in memory of the tragic death there of Charles Lennox, fourth Duke of Richmond. 

The story has been often published with varying details. But the account written by his son, Lord William Pitt Lennox, has not, I think, been reproduced in recent years. It may be of interest to read his own words:

That a far cry from the glitter and glamour of his vice-regal courts at Dublin and Quebec, from his sumptuous entertainments at Goodwood, from the gorgeous ball at Brussels where the Richmonds entertained Wellington and his officers on the eve of Quatre Bras and Waterloo, to this poor crazed Charles Lennox, running madly through a Canadian swamp, and dying at last on a pallet of straw in a back-woods cow byre. “He was born in a barn, and he has died in a barn” said the gossips, when the news reached England. Which was true. Read-The Haunted Canoe from the Jock River

Immigration/ settlers stories

Ramsay W.I. Tweedsmuir History Book 1—SOME EARLY RAMSAY HISTORY

Plans For the Lanark County Townships, 1827, with Names Names Names

How Did Settlers Make Their Lime?

Mothell Parish familes that are in the 1816-1822 1816 – 1824 Beckwith Settlers Names

The Old Settlers Weren’t so Old After All

Dear Lanark Era –Lanark Society Settlers Letter

Ramsay Settlers 101

Beckwith –Settlers — Sir Robert the Bruce— and Migrating Turtles

Come to Canada– the Weather is Fine — Immigration Links

Lanark Settlement Emigrants Leave Scotland

Sheppard’s Falls — Shipman’s Falls — Shipman’s Mills –Waterford — Ramsayville Victoriaville and Almonte — Senator Haydon

ROCKIN’ Cholera On the Trek to the New World — Part 4

Rock the Boat! Lanark County or Bust! Part 1

It Wasn’t the Sloop John B — Do’s and Don’t in an Immigrant Ship -Part 2

Riders on the Storm– Journey to Lanark County — Part 3

The Local Road Camps of the 1930s

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The Local Road Camps of the 1930s

The big road camp built by the Provincial Government in Darling Township in 1934 was partially destroyed by fire last Saturday morning. Provincial’ police believe that it was the work of incendiaries and have been carrying on an investigation into the circumstances. Just before going to press today (Thursday) afternoon The Gazette got in touch with provincial police at their district headquarters in Perth and found that no warrants had been issued up to the present time.

Relief Camp Road Construction – Rockliffe 1930s

While not committing themselves to any extent the provincial officers admitted that it looked like the work of “fire bugs.” This camp which had about a dozen units, including warehouses, dormitories, cook houses etc. was constructed during the time, townships like Lavant, Darling and part of Pakenham were under jurisdiction of the Northern Development Department. About half of the buildings were destroyed.

It is understood the watchman, Murray McLean of Perth, was in Calabogie a t the time. The camp has not been occupied since last fall when road work in Darling was discontinued. It is locatell about nine miles from Calabogie. Ray Kilgour of Eganville, was watchman in the interests of contractors who had supplied equipment such as bedding, etc. It was his time off, according to reports. That the camp may have been burned by people who were angry because they did not get work on the roads is a theory that the police are running down. One bright feature about the sad occurrence is that the $900 “root house” constructed by Premier Hepburn’s Government escaped the flames and will remain a monument to those great architects who constructed it. 1936 May Almonte Gazette

Thousands of jobless men were shunted off to federal relief camps in the Canadian wilderness in the 1930s. The camps became a focal point for a generations anger and a lasting legacy of a government’s ineffectiveness during the era.

By 1932, there were an estimated 70,000 unemployed transients. Many of the men congregated in cities and frustration was growing among their ranks.

As the number of jobless transients grew, the federal government feared they could threaten public order. Bennett’s military chief, General Andy McNaughton, warned that the unemployed could launch a Communist revolt. suggested that the men be sent to rural relief camps where they could neither vote nor organize. The camps were voluntary, but those who resisted could be arrested for vagrancy. he men cleared bush, built roads, planted trees, erected public buildings in return for room, board, medical care and 20 cents a day. They were paid one-tenth of what an employed labourer would make doing the same work.

In April 1935, the men’s unhappiness boiled over. Fifteen hundred men from the British Columbia relief camps went on strike and congregated in Vancouver. The move launched months of cross-country protests, which culminated in a riot in the streets of Regina.

A year later, with a change of government, the unpopular relief camps were shut down. Some of the men found temporary work but most returned to their wasted lives in the cities.

In all, 170,248 men had stayed in the camps.

During the Great Depression and WWII, the Office of War Information and the Farm Security Administration encouraged people to “put up” foodstuffs and use their existing root cellars or even make new ones. They were encouraged to waste nothing and that meant keeping food as fresh as possible for as long as possible.

MEN PLACED ON FARMS Another week’s operation tacked 500 more placements on the Ontario Governments score in its farm-labor drive; and Hon. David Croll,/minister of Labor and Public welfare, announced Wednesday that the total through all agencies can now be Estimated conservatively a t 2(500 m |n. Placement score during. the second half of last week was  through offices of the Employment Service of Canada, 28 through district representatives of the Ontario^ Department of Agriculture, and an estimated 50 more through relief officials. Almonte Gazette 1936

May 30 1936

Provincial police from their district headquarters a t Perth, are carrying on two investigations in the Township of Darling at the present time. One of these has to do with the fire that destroyed the Provincial Government road camp on the morning of Saturday, May 9th and the other concerns the stripping and theft of heavy copper wire from the steel towers of the Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario. Two arrests have already been made. The watchman in charge and Ray Kiigour of Eganville, are in jail at Perth, following their arrest last Thursday, May 21st. 4 McLean was watching the camp in the interests of the Government while Kilgour was there in the interests of the contractors who had supplied blankets and other equipment. According, to a police theory the Company that supplied blankets did not ask for the return of extras included in the order and these were disposed of to farmers and other residents of the district. The Company then made a demand for the return of all its equipment and the fire ensued. It is understood the caretakers of the camp deny all connection with the mysterious fire that destroyed half of the buildings.

related reading

Ramsay 1927 — The Depression

Hobos, Apple Pie, and the Depression–Tales from 569 South Street

almonte gazette 1930

Getting Rid of the Demon Rum- “Flies Flew Drunkenly Away”

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Getting Rid of the Demon Rum- “Flies Flew Drunkenly Away”

1939

I haven’t touched a drop of liquor in 48 years, and I’m not going to start now,” he said. But at one time, he admitted, he drank so much whisky he perspired grain alcohol. “When I was a young man out west. I used to be the first person in the bars in the morning and the last on to leave at night.” It got so bad that flies, landing briefly on his person, flew drunkenly away’ after the contact.

His companions were even afraid to light matches near him. “I came to Lanark about 49 years ago with so much alcohol in my system I never thought I’d get it out. But I took the cure from Dr. Frank A. Munroe, and within five weeks I couldn’t even take a shot of scotch, drowned in water. Financed by his mother, he bought the recipe for the cure from Dr. Munroe and started up in business here. Since then, thousands of people have paraded their delirium treatments through his front parlour.

Patients have floated in on an alcoholic cloud, and walked out with their feet treading the narrow path of sobriety. “In 95 per cent, of the cases. I’ve made complete cures,” he said. “A few of the men have slipped, but not many.” Some of his patients vibrated like tuning forks when they started to take the cure. They shook so much. Mr. McKay had to back them up against a wall and tie them with towels to give them a drink. It was hard work, because most of them were trying to lick an army of pink demons and purple dinosaurs at the same time.

“I’ve seen some bad cases.” he admitted, “but the women were the worst. They were terrible.” He shook his head sadly, but didn’t elaborate. While he said drinking is on the increase, his business has fallen off terrifically. Instead of financing a cure, people are spending their money on drink. Twenty years ago he had as many as five or six new patients a day. but now all the drunks do is weave past his door.

In 48 years residence Mr. McKay has found time to do more than just fight Demon Rum. He is also busy in the community. You can’t advertise your own business too much, in the opinion of Mr. McKay. He has personally presented his “Drunkenness Is a Curable Disease” cards to many local town councils of which he said had no interest at all in a cure.

Also read

Drunk and Disorderly in Lanark County

Her Father Was a Local Drunkard

They Tried to Make Me go to Rehab

Did you Know that Temperance Drinks Are all the Rage Now?

Middleville 1938 and Things

Slinky Pyjamas 1936 Lovebird Colours

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Slinky Pyjamas 1936 Lovebird Colours
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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
12 Aug 1936, Wed  •  Page 19
Daily News from New York, New York on May 14, 1936 · 199
1936
Daily News from New York, New York on May 20, 1936 · 137
1936
1936
1936 Illustration of ladies’ nightwear from page 52 of J E York autumn/winter catalogue of 1935 – 1936, featuring beautiful and elegant nightgowns in paste…
1936

1960’s Fashion Shows– Once a Huge Extravaganza!

The Alice Walker Fashion Show 1974 Carleton Place

You Better Work it Girl! Cover Girls of Carleton Place 1965

Miss Civitan Club 1976? Who Are These Women?

Mary Cook’s Deportment Classes for Young Ladies in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Mod Fashion Show 1960’s

And Then There was Cook’s– and Most of All Mary Cook

Fashion Faux Pas in the Cemetery

Style Watch and Fashion Notes 1881

  1. Saved by Her Corset
  2. It’s Electrifying! Dr Scott’s Electric Corset
  3. Death by Corset?
  4. Bring Out Your Dead and Other Notions!
  5. Saddle Shoes –Did You Walk a Mile in Those Shoes?

Shopping Online in China — I Bought This and Look What I Got!

The Poker Face of Corsets and Waist Training -1800s Fashion Comes Back in Style

The Stack Perm or the Disco Wedge ? 1970s Hair Fashion

Should Girls Speak to Strange Men in Uniform? 1917

Why Were These Folks Facing Backwards?

The Best Little Chin Hair Post on the Prairie

Lois Lyman–A Hair of a Blunder!

To Die Dying Your Hair

Sometimes You Win and Sometimes You Lose –The Great Peters

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Sometimes You Win and Sometimes You Lose –The Great Peters

CLIPPED FROM–The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Aug 1938, Mon  •  Page 15

I was looking for some information for someone on Friday when I came across this photo of The Great Peters who did a dazzling feat at the Ottawa Ex in August of 1938. I asked myself if he made it through life trying to hang himself daily, and somehow I just knew that he had screwed up somewhere.

None of them had expected to see a man actually die that night in St. Louis in October of 1943 at Tom Pack’s Police Circus tours. In spite of the announcement before The Great Peters act none of those almost 6,000 folks ever thought he might become the victim of the leap which he had performed hundreds of times.

Booked as “the man who hangs himself and lives to tell it,” Aloysius Peters, 45, was killed at the Arena, the victim of a leap from a defective rope. Peters climbed to the 75-foot trapeze bar for his act and, adjusting a noose around his neck, plummeted into space before 5,627 horrified spectators.

A Framed Vintage Circus Poster

A veteran performer, who said his family had been in circus work for more than 500 years, was listed as No. 13 that night on the Firemen’s Wild West Rodeo and Thrill Circus. It was his death number as he climbed to the 75 – foot trapeze bar for his act and adjusted a noose around his neck before he plummeted into space.

Always before he had grabbed the rope a second or so before he hit the end of the jump, thus taking the jerk with his arms. That night he apparently reached for the rope to break the fall a split second too late and was hanged.

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch
St. Louis, Missouri
24 Oct 1943, Sun  •  Page 3

The “rope” he used was not resilient enough, his wife said, and put his timing off. Made of strands of rubber covered with canvas, the rope was a new one which he purchased two weeks previous in Cleveland and the wartime rubber was not the same quality he previously had purchased from London. When he jumped that night the rope tightened under the impact of his weight, then jerked him 20 feet into the air to dangle like a sack until attendants brought his body down.

The performer was rushed to Deaconess Hospital but was pronounced dead before arrival. The police report said death was caused by a broken neck. Billed as “The Great Peters” the showman received, from $650 to $1,000 a week from his act, according to Jack Van Pelt, publicity director of the show. Fire Chief Egan Richter said that a check for approximately $800, a full week’s salary, would be sent to the widow.

Peters was adding a new thrill to his performance that night and was jumping 30 feet farther than before. Because of the longer distance, it is believed he failed to estimate the exact moment to grab the rope to keep the noose from his neck. For the first time his wife, the former Catherine Cowdery, failed to watch his performance. As an expectant mother, she had assisted with the act until two weeks ago. She remembered he worked with the rope all day on the kitchen floor, testing it again and again. He didn’t say anything about it not being up to standard or she would have insisted he use the old rope to make the usual jump.

The crowd had been warned by the announcer when Peters began his act that he required absolute quiet in order to concentrate fully. The arena was brilliantly lit as the figure in white-spangled tights started the headfirst dive which ended his life. Spectators were quiet until he reached the end of the rope, then they roared their approval, not realizing he had been fatally injured.

Members of the family described the rope as “one-half inch rubber rope”, and said it did not contain any steel cable or other metal. Perry held the ladder for Peters as he climbed to the 75-foot high platform for the finale of his act. “I have seen him jump many times, Perry said, “but he went so fast this time that I knew something was wrong. That new rope just didn’t have enough ‘give’ to it.”

Mrs. Peters was expecting the birth of her child the next day the newspapers said. She was taken to a hospital the night following the tragedy, but was resting at the home of an aunt and uncle the next day. When asked if she would permit her expected child to become a circus performer, Mrs. Peters replied, “No sir. After all the circus is not in my blood, and even though my child will have a heritage of several centuries on the paternal side, I will discourage any signs of showmanship. I don’t want my child to be a performer.”

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The St. Louis Star and Times
St. Louis, Missouri
17 Nov 1943, Wed  •  Page 5

Peters, who was born in Germany, came to the United States in 1931 and appeared with Tom Mix, the Ringling Brothers circus and Gene Autry. “My husband had been doing this act for almost 13 years,” Mrs. Peters said. “In Canada a few weeks ago he did a 165-foot jump, much longer than last night’s jump, and nothing happened. His family has been in the circus business since the year 1800. He always told me that everyone had a time to die and, no matter when it was, when his turn came, he would be ready to go. Every time one of his old circus friends met with a fatal accident he cautioned me to be ready if such a thing ever happened to him”.

“But I wasn’t ready,” she kept repeating. Mrs. Peters met her husband when he appeared with the Police Circus and they were married almost three years ago.

The huge crowd sat in hushed silence following the accident, at first unaware of the tragedy. When Peter’s body snapped into the air following the impact at the end of the jump the announcer told the crowd, “He’s dazed momentarily.” When the body continued to hang limp in mid-air, A. P. Seldon, one of the circus performers who is booked as “the man who swings and sways in the air,” climbed the ladder to remove the body. Fire Chief Egan-Richter directed the removal. It took over an hour to remove the body in a packed arena. Many customers walked out and some performers refused to perform after the incident.

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Veteran circus performers stood by and wept unashamedly, but all went on with the show when their spots came. Tears streaming down her makeup, Genevieve Canistrellis declared the entire company considered Peters “a great performer.” Billy Pape said he had a premonition as he went on for his act that something might happen to Peters. Brightly dressed clowns, too, were crying backstage.

To make matters worse a dummy clown was shot out of a cannon later on in the evening, but none of the paying customers realized it when the dummy’s head hit the ceiling and was stuck between two girders.

Ernie Young, arena director, who said he had booked Peters for 10 years, asserted he was one of the top performers. Peters’ death wasn’t the only excitement provided the opening-night crowd. A wild Brahma bull bucked his rider off and leaped over the 5-foot-high side rail, scattering those in box seats into the ring or to standing positions on their, chairs. The animal charged through the aisle in back of the boxes, running halfway around the Arena before he was captured. The bull’s rider, Russell Bryan, 28, of 457A Eichelberger St., was taken to City Hospital where he was pronounced suffering from a possible fracture of the left forearm.

Cause of death? Aloysius Peters, known to fans as “the Great Peter” and “The Man Who Hangs Himself and Lives,” lost his life at Louis, Mo., Firemen’s Annual Benefit Show when the new rope used did not have sufficient elasticity to break his fall. Reality? Production of rubber, and plastics leaped during the war, nearly quadrupling so it went down in quality. That rope really was not appropriate fare for a death defying circus act of that magnitude.

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St. Louis Globe-Democrat
St. Louis, Missouri
24 Oct 1943, Sun  •  Page 43
Their home at 1815 Bacon St is now vacant land in St. Louis, MO 63106. This vacant land is a 3,151 square foot lot

What is this show which, like a Roman carnival, horrifies the spectators with the drama of sudden death? It is billed as a Wild West rodeo and thrill show. It is a professional carnival enterprise, in this Instance bolstering its profits by sharing receipts with the firemen’s benefit fund. As worthy as is this fund, can the firemen of St. Louis afford to be longer associated with this kind of entertainment which so recklessly allows performers to expose themselves to danger, and the public to possible scenes of horror?

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The St. Louis Star and Times
St. Louis, Missouri
05 Nov 1943, Fri  •  Page 20
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CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1938, Wed  •  Page 19

n’ Mamas (USA)  and The Sherbrooke Record

relatedreading

When the Circus Shut the Town Down

The Boy that Ran Away to the Circus and Other Stories

When the Circus came to Carleton Place

The Continuing Curse of William Street in Carleton Place

What Happened the Day the Circus Left Carleton Place

Just Beat It! Carnival Riot in Carleton Place at Riverside Park

The Horses of Carleton Place– Wonder if they ever had a Merlin?

My Greatest Summer Show on Earth!

Stories my Grandfather Told Me– The Circus

Carleton Place Memories 1930s and 1940s

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Carleton Place Memories 1930s and 1940s

17310997_1387371974653026_5719382261551101259_o.jpg17240604_1387371977986359_7480365774636335226_o.jpgCarleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

This poem was written in 1996 by Harold R. Drummond and recalls his youth in Carleton Place in the 1930’s and ’40’s.

 

 

relatedreading

Almonte Poetry —- Agnes Whitelaw Boyce Almonte

A Poem about Innisville–By Mrs. Edith Bolton

Alice Katherine Gould– Smiths Falls — Gould Family

A Beckwith Poem — Beckwith in the Bushes — J.W.S. Lowry 1918

Annie Patterson — Descendant of John Gemmill

Did you Know Mother Goose Came from Blakeney and Union Hall ?

Genealogist Christmas Poem

The Old Saw Mill Poem – Lanark County

Was the Rhyme Ring Around the Rosie Connected to the Plague?

Postage Stamp Flirtation 1903

Come on and Feel the Noise –Last Night’s Mini Poetry Slam

Slot Machines in Smiths Falls– Not Good For the Public

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Slot Machines in Smiths Falls– Not Good For the Public

 

557d820aa6e710721664f3668471f2d3.jpg

 

 

 - . To Place $100 Tax On Slot Machines In Smiths...
 - a . !2la?TWrb1let f " Raps licensing Of Slot...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 28 Aug 1935, Wed,
  3. Page 13

 

historicalnotes

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  1. Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 10 Jan 1935, Thu,
    3. Page 20
  2. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

    relatedreading

     

    The End of Easy Money in Lanark County

  3. The Not So “Silent Bell” of Lanark County

  4. The Schwerdtfegerisms of Tobacco and Gambling

    A Warning to Those Gambling Ladies of Carleton Place!

    Gambling in Carleton Place — Viva Old Las Carleton Place