Tag Archives: 1900s

Millinery 1909 — The Merry Widow The Mushroom

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Millinery 1909 — The Merry Widow The Mushroom
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
05 Oct 1904, Wed  •  Page 1
Marion Umpherson Prentice in front of her shop.

It is easy for one to sit behind the plate glass and make mind bets on the success of the millinery openings. Some deductions are obvious. The ladies and bachelors seem to get the greatest pleasure from the occasion. In fact the particular position which’ each person occupies in the social structure of the town is portrayed in their attitude on those exciting epochs .

Merry Widow Hat

When the fashion bonded public for the first time this Spring we wonder whether the Merry Widow or the Charlotte Corday, or some new favourite is to occupy the highest places for the present. The fluttering excitement of the maiden, the self poise of the matron, veteran of many campaigns, the cynical smile of the bachelor, society’s excess baggage and the thinly-veiled uneasiness of the heads of families—all pass in review before us. Judging from appearance hats are going to be very amicably worn.

Charlotte Corday Hat

The extreme horizon of the Happy World has been more or less contracted—so much so in fact that it will scarcely be necessary for ordinary men to carry a package of court plaster tor the purpose of repairing their damaged features in future. There is a new , favourite: “ The Mushroom.” It does not resemble the common or garden vegetable much, except in the name. It may be that the title was derived from the fact that with one of them in the house there isn’t “mushroom” for anything else.

The Mushroom Hat

Some people like to try on hats, some people don’t. It depends a good deal on how they look, but the ones who do not feel quite satisfied have the satisfaction of knowing; that they didn’t have their hair fixed right. Let it be understood that while the fans of the immediate future seem to a tenderfoot, to have shrunk slightly, there is still sufficient to them to prevent the summer’s sun making freckles on the end of the nose.

March 1909 Lanark Era

  • The fashion designer Lucile had designed the original widow hat for an operetta in 1907, but it influenced hat fashions for many more years.  
  • The Merry Widow hat was always black and encased in filmy chiffon or organdie and festooned in feathers.

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Jul 1912, Mon  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Sat, Sep 24, 1904 · Page 4
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Apr 1949, Thu  •  Page 7
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
02 Nov 1935, Sat  •  Page 18
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Oct 1899, Sat  •  Page 6
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
13 Aug 1901, Tue  •  Page 2

Hats, Ogilvy’s and Gaudy Teenage Years — Noreen Tyers

Local Women Wearing Hats– Photos Chica Boom Chica Boom

Mad For Hats!! Doris Blackburn’s Hat

Effie McCallum —– Missing Milliner

Mrs. James Prentice Hatmaker Milliner of Lanark

Mad For Hats!! Doris Blackburn’s Hat

Wearing Vintage Hats – Blowing the Lid off Katherine Newton

Bertha Schwerdtfeger — Mother of the Carleton Place Schwerdtfeger Sisters

Mad as a Hatter — Wearing Vintage Hats

Electrical Plugs — Hats– and Impressive Men – Putting on the Ritz in Almonte

Pour some Feathers on Me

Weird Wendell’s Paperback Writers

Scams, Schemes and Travelling Salesmen of the 1900s

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Scams, Schemes and Travelling Salesmen of the 1900s
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Aug 1912, Wed  •  Page 4

Gypsies, Preachers and Big White Bears: One Hundred Years on Country Roads
By Claudia Smith

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
21 Feb 1900, Wed  •  Page 1

The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
Wed, Apr 09, 1913 · Page 4

Here’s a classfied ad beyond belief…

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
30 Aug 1911, Wed  •  Page 1

Would You Smoke a Hornet’s Nest?

Medicine for Weak Women — Hokum Era

The Remedy Women of Lanark County

Was Lipstick Banned and the $64,000 Question

What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

When the Spanish Fly Kicks In !

If Quackery Poison Gets You!! Blue Poison Ointment

Constipation Guaranteed to be Cured in Almonte

It’s Electrifying! Dr Scott’s Electric Corset

We’re Off to See the Wizard — The Poisoner’s Handbook?

Know Your Travelling Salesman 1900s — McKesson & Robbins — Cannabis and Scandals

Rawleigh Memories — Door to Door Salesmen

Views Of Ottawa (Aylmer) Basil Reid 1890-1900 Simpson Book Collection – Photos Photos Photos

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Views Of Ottawa (Aylmer) Basil Reid 1890-1900 Simpson Book Collection – Photos Photos Photos

From the Simpson Book Collection-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

Ottawa, Canada: Self Published, 1890-1900. 1st Ed. Booklet — Paperback. Oblong. 30 Pgs.. Nr Fine. Views of Ottawa by Basil Reid, Bank Street Ottawa, Canada, 1890-1900. 1st Edition. Paperback. . 30 Pgs. 30 black and white photos of landmark buildings, parks, falls, monuments, parks, etc. in Ottawa. There is no date, include horse & buggies, streetcars, women in ankle length dresses. Britannia Boating Club House c 1900 on the pier is shown in the book as Britannia Canoe Club House

Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

Remember Lover’s Lane? Lover’s Walk? Les Chats Sauvage? Simpson Books

You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books

Down on Main Street– 1911-Photos- For the Discriminating and the Particular — Simpson Books

The General Hospital 1867-1929 Photos — Simpson Books

Renfrew Fair 1953-1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

Did You Know? Union School #9 and Goulburn #16

When One Boat Filled the Rideau Lock–Rideau King

Women’s Institute Burritts Rapids 1902-1988

Looking for Photos of ‘The Castle’ in Ashton

A Romantic Story of the Founding Of Burritt’s Rapids

The First Half Century of Ottawa Pictorial McLeod Stewart – Simpson Book Collection

1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

Ottawa, The Capital of the Dominion of Canada 1923 Simpson Book Collection

1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

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1906 INDUSTRIAL AND PICTURESQUE OTTAWA CANADA – PHOTOS— Simpson Book Collection

From the Simpson Book Collection-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

There is no date however based on some of the content it appears to have been published sometime between 1905 – 1910.
It measures approximately 6 1/2″ x 11″ with 64 pages
It was published by THE CITY OF OTTAWA PUBLICITY DEPARTMENT
Information and Photographs include:

  • Panoramic view of Parliament Hill and Rideau Locks
  • Post Office 
  • Scenes of Government Driveway
  • Ottawa Palatial Houses
  • Monuments
  • His Excellency, Earl Grey
  • Ottawa University
  • Churches
  • Byrson, Graham
  • Gilmour & Hughson Mill
  • International Portland Cement Co
  • Packing Houses of the George Matthews Co. Ltd
  • Martin-Orme Piano Co
  • Britannia Was Canoe Crew, Champion of Canada
  • Hotel and Victoria 
  • and much more

ADVERTISEMENTS include:

  • The Bank of Ottawa
  • Ottawa Business College
  • The Willis Business College 
  • Canadian Pacific Railway
  • Ottawa Machinery
  • Ottawa Ladies College
  • Bank of Montreal
  • Richelieu and Ontario Navigation Company
  • John M. Garland , Son & Co
  • The Russell House Hotel
  • Ottawa Electric Railway
  • Pittaway’s Photo Studio
  • Hull Electric Railway
  • The Ottawa Stair Works 
  • and many more
E.B. Eddy’s– still running today-Jim Sharp

Simpson Book Collection

Bustling About Burritt’s Rapids– Public School Photos

Remember Lover’s Lane? Lover’s Walk? Les Chats Sauvage? Simpson Books

You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books

The Oldest Building on Ottawa and Opeongo Line

Down on Main Street– 1911-Photos- For the Discriminating and the Particular — Simpson Books

The General Hospital 1867-1929 Photos — Simpson Books

Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

Renfrew Fair 1953-1953-Ed and Shirley (Catherine) Simpson

Did You Know? Union School #9 and Goulburn #16

When One Boat Filled the Rideau Lock–Rideau King

Women’s Institute Burritts Rapids 1902-1988

You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books

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You Have to Open Up a Business Here!!! 1912 Ottawa Marketing — Simpson Books
This was a booklet that was put out in January- June 1912 by the Publicity and Industrial Bureau advertising for new business. 48 pages with giant fold out map. Thanks to Ed and Shirley Simpson I am slowly going though boxes of books from the late Ed Simpson to document and after will be donated to a proper spot-Ed and Shirley’s Simpson –Historic Books — the List

Herbert Barker was in charge , a commisioner for the City Hall

This ad was in the newspapers every week

CLIPPED FROMNational PostToronto, Ontario, Canada29 Jul 1911, Sat  •  Page 10

Children are permitted in Apartments!!! Wow!!!

The Ice Pick Cometh — Ottawa Artificial Ice Co.

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

Ottawa to Perth in One Day!! James Copeland

Several Shades of Christina Gray –Home for Friendless Women in Ottawa

The Souvenir Spoon Man of Carleton Place — Samuel Breadner — Father of Lloyd Samuel Breadner

Know Your ” Pop Stars” from the 1900s —Marie Studholme — Emma Buffam Files

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Know Your ” Pop Stars” from the 1900s —Marie Studholme — Emma Buffam Files

Marie Studholme

ONe of the ostcards sent to Emma Buffam from Carleton Place 1908– Click

Born-10th September 1873* – Eccleshill, Yorkshire (England).Died10th March 1930Real NameCaroline Maria Lupton.Married1) Gilbert James Porteous, 2) 12th September 1908, Harold Giles BorrettMiscellanea1892: Signed by Charles Wyndham to join his company at the Criterion Theatre in London.1897: Toured US with George Edwardes No. 1 company.From an early age was raised by her grandparents, Samuel Lupton [Grocer] and wife Mary Ann – possibly the daughter of their son Joseph.One of the most popular postcards beauties of her day.*Some sources say 1875 – 1873 is confirmed in census records.

The Guardian
London, Greater London, England
11 Mar 1930, Tue  •  Page 8

“Alice”
Produced at The Prince of Wales Theatre, London.
Reviewed in Lloyds Weekly News [London] – 23rd June, 1906.

Mr. Lewis Carroll’s Alice – everybody’s Alice – became popular directly she was born, and her popularity was placed on a sure foundation immediately she became Alice in Wonderland.

She has more child-worshippers than any other heroine of fairy lore, and her reappearance in the Christmas season will, we expect, be welcome through ages yet to come. On Thursday, when the piece was revived there was general joy over the dance by a pack of cards with, of course, any number of “tricks,” and there was merriment over a Gollywog dance, which was to the credit of the funny and agile Mr. Will Bishop. And what laughter came of the droll antics of Tweedledum and Tweedledee, drolly impersonated by Messrs. Tom Graves and Buckstone! More welcome still was the Mad Hatter, who was portrayed in the most comical of colours by Mr. Stanley Brett. The hatter was not quite so mad as he looked, and his madness seemed modified by the presence of the pretty little March Hare, which was not mad at all, and by the gentleman of the White Rabbit, delightfully presented by Miss Rita Leggerie.

Miss Marie Studholme was beautiful, of course, as Alice, and easily found her way to favour by her graceful dancing. Then there was little Carmen Sylva, who took honours by storm in some remarkable vocal efforts, and there was cordial approval for Miss Florence Lloyd as the White Queen and Queen of Hearts; for Miss Phyllis Bedells, a wonderful juvenile dancer; and for Miss Marjorie West, who was our old friend the Cheshire Cat. A series of comic cinematograph pictures is presented between the two parts and will add to the enjoyment of all who see them. Alice, on Thursday, had to share attention with Miss Ellaline Terriss, who, with baby, was seated in a private box.

The Observer
London, Greater London, England
23 Dec 1906, Sun  •  Page 8
Sioux City Journal
Sioux City, Iowa
23 Aug 1908, Sun  •  Page 15

Appendicitis 1911 — One Made it One Did Not — Young McGill

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Appendicitis 1911 — One Made it One Did Not — Young McGill

Andrew died from the operation..

Name:Andrew Morton Young
Gender:M (Male)
Birth Date:19 Aug 1890
Birth Place:Almonte, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada
Death Date:11 Jan 1911
Death Place:Toronto Municipality, Ontario, Canada
Cemetery:Auld Kirk Cemetery
Burial or Cremation Place:Mississippi Mills, Lanark County, Ontario, Canada

1911, Friday January 13, The Almonte Gazette, front page
Obit. – Morton Young
Much anxiety was caused by word received on Friday last by Mr Andrew Young stating that his son Morton, was ill at Toronto, where he was attending the School of Practical Science. Mr and Mrs Young at once left for the city, and when they reached there found that an operation had been performed by Dr Starr for appendicitis and that there was other serious affections of the bowels which rendered recovery somewhat uncertain. Every care and attention were given but dreaded complications developed and on Wednesday morning the disease had done its work, and death came.

Though not unexpected here, the sad word came as a severe shock, not only to the relatives but to many others who appreciated the worth of the young man just entering the portals of real life, and with the ability, energy and stability to make that life a success. Mr and Mrs Young returned home on Thursday morning, bringing the remains with them and the funeral will take place from the home on Church street to the eighth line cemetery on Friday afternoon at half-past two o’clock. Andrew Morton Young was the second son of Mr and Mrs Andrew Young, and was twenty years of age. He was a young man possessed of a mechanical mind far beyond the average, and it was natural that after graduation from high school here he should turn his attention to work of that character. He spent some time in the foundry here, then in the Canada General Electric Works at Peterboro, and at the time of his death he was taking a course of study at the School of Practical Science at Toronto. Mr Russell Young, a brother of the deceased, is at Vancouver, B.C., and Miss Etta and Master Vincent are at home. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Young and the family in the deep shade of sorrow that has so suddenly overspread their home.

Picture of

Due to the danger of surgical procedures in the 1800s, appendectomies didn’t really catch on until the 1880s, as advances in pain relieve and infection prevention made them safer. The diagnostic practice was still pretty iffy. It seems like doctors were still learning about human anatomy. It was a dangerous operation. Though today surgery to remove the appendix is routine, in the late 1800s appendicitis, like pneumonia, was a death sentence. So, most people who got appendicitis in that period died either from the disease, or from infection after the operation. 

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Jan 1911, Wed  •  Page 9
NAME:Ethel Mary Ruth Fonton McGill
GENDER:Female
BIRTH DATE:8 Mar 1876
BIRTH PLACE:Lanark, Ontario, Canada
FATHER:William McGill
MOTHER:Jane B Fenton

Did You know they Wanted to Cut the Bay Hill Down? And Other Stories

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Did You know they Wanted to Cut the Bay Hill Down? And Other Stories
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 May 1907, Sat  •  Page 19
1920
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Sep 1904, Mon  •  Page 5
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Nov 1923, Thu  •  Page 6
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Mar 1939, Fri  •  Page 5
A view of Almonte from Bay Hill.
1900
Almonte– Mill of Kintail Files
Photo is from Almonte.com —Bay Hill towards cameronian church
The township’s Reformed or Cameronian Presbyterians moved their place of services in about 1867 to the former Canadian Presbyterian church on the Eighth Line, later building their present church facing the Mississippi’s Almonte bay–

read also

The Story of “Old Mitchell,” Who Lived Outside of Almonte

How to Make Butter 1916

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How to Make Butter 1916
Cloverdale Reveille
Cloverdale, California
30 Dec 1916, Sat  •  Page 7

Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter

Lots of Laundry– Lassie Come Home!!!!

Was the Butter Tart Really Invented in Barrie, Ontario? Jaan Kolk Files

Cold Milk Ice Cream and Butter —- Carleton Place

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Pakenham Cheese & Butter Factory– McCreary Blair Storey

Butter in pails, 17 to 18c-The Almonte Farmer’s Market 1898

What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh

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What’s in a Photo — Stuart McIntosh
Photo- thanks to Stuart McIntosh

This is a lovely photo of “Sewing Class at Mrs. Lockwoods 1904”. Jenny Stewart, Diana Ennis, Jamie Devlin, Tena Fyfe and Florence Watson.

Stuart McIntosh told me he was fortunate to have met Florence Watson. I asked him if he had any memories and he said:

Yes.. she recalled paying the doctor’s bill with hens. She was full of fun and didn’t like her picture taken. We have a family photo of her on her 90th birthday. She always taught her dog to roll over and she was quite active all her life.”

She married a Morris who died much earlier than her. Late in life she learned of her brother’s poor health and much to her family’s surprise, flew to B.C. and brought him home so she could care for him. She raised 2 daughters and 1 son. He stayed on the farm and remained a bachelor while the daughter’s married and eventually farmed in the same neck of the woods.

Thanks Stuart McIntosh!

Hoping to receive more info on some of these other these sewing gals.

A bit of a tale about sewing...

We can think of sewing as a kind of performance, despite its domestic setting – a way for women to prove their femininity and suitability as wives, lovers and mothers. Like any good performance, sewing needs its props, and the tools used by women to prepare and execute their work were often objects of art in their own right.

As well as being highly decorative, many sewing implements also carried coded messages in their design. Thimbles are a good example, as they were often presented as gifts and therefore their mottoes and images can be read as a message for the recipient.

Needless to say, such items tended to reinforce the prevailing view of femininity, conveying messages on an object intended for use in a virtuous, industrious context. Thimbles often displayed messages relating to love and marriage, which was in most cases the only realistic objective open to middle- and upper-class women until around 1900.

Like the elegant implements that preceded it, the early sewing machine was most definitely a status object. Decorated with lacquer and housed in a fashionable cabinet, these machines were designed to sit at the heart of the drawing room, advertising the domestic virtue of the lady who occupied it. It was not until prices began to drop after 1900 – and poorer women could buy them on hire-purchase – that the sewing machine became strictly utilitarian. The increasing availability of shop-bought clothing meant that home sewing lost its cachet, and became a thrifty expedient to be hidden where possible. Advertisements for sewing machines reflect this shift, with the earliest ones extolling the style and beauty of their product, to be replaced with assurances of discretion and portability once the machine lost status. The sewing machine in its heyday marked the high point of home sewing as a leisure pursuit, praised in ladies’ journals and illustrated magazines for its efficiency and pleasantness. It also, however, marked the beginning of the end. 

The Eaton’s Sewing Girls

Did you Know About the The Venus Family Sewing Machine?

Gypsies Tramps and Thieves

A Story of Sewing Past

Were You the King of King’s Castle in Carleton Place? Linda’s Mailbag

How to Make a Vintage Apron- Aitkenhead Photo Collection

Singer Sewing Machines and Scandals

One Village? One Sewing Needle!