Tag Archives: 1897

What Would You Wear to the Carleton Place 1897 Inaugural Ball?

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What Would You Wear to the Carleton Place 1897 Inaugural Ball?

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
09 Jun 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
17 Nov 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1897, Wed  •  Page 5
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
24 Nov 1897, Wed  •  Page 1

So what did they wear to the Inaugural Ball at the town hall 1897?

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Aug 1896, Sat  •  Page 4

Also read-Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

Memories Carleton Place- Town Hall

The Building of the First Town Hall Carleton Place

Carleton Place Town Hall Sued For Cupolas!

Why is the Town Hall Stage Slanted? Is it Collapsing?

A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

Shenanigans of the Monday Night Town Hall Opening

What Didn’t You Know? The New Town Hall 1897

A Concert at the Town Hall While Small Pox Raged on…. 1901

Sarah Marselles the Spirit of the Town Hall Square Park

Saved By The Bell in Carleton Place? What Does the Photo Say?

Things You Did Not Know About the Town Hall….

We Don’t Need the Almonte Fair 1897 – “Admission to the grounds is 25 cents, which is twice too much!”

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We Don’t Need the Almonte Fair 1897 – “Admission to the grounds is 25 cents, which is twice too much!”

The special train which is run generally from Carleton Place connecting the Ottawa and Perth trains, arrives in Almonte at 1:30pm. On leaving town the train goes at 7 or 7:30pm, so that the majority that come never see the town or leave one solitary cent, only what they paid to the society for admission.

September 1897–almonte gazette

They have lunch before they come and arrive home just In time for supper. The admission to the grounds is 25 cents, which is twice too much. The poor farmer, which this society professed to befriend and encourage, sees but little for his hard-earned 25 cents.

He cannot, bring his wife and eight or nine children, for that means a week’s hard earnings. The mechanic in town finds nothing in his line of business, the artist but little-in his. In fact, the money of Almonte, which could be put to better use than granting to the N. L. A. S. Fair, unless they make a public statement and show their indebtedness, should be carefully guarded. Even if Almonte saw the need of such a grant, let a councillor ask it Independently of a society director.

15 Sep 1897, Wed  

September 1897–almonte gazette
September 1897–almonte gazette

Rossow’s Midgets in vaudette, February 1910
Photographer
Feinberg
Date
February, 1910
Notes
Rossow’s Midgets was a vaudeville boxing act that pitted German brothers Franz and Carl Actermeier against each other. The brothers, both little people, were managed by Herman Rossow. Collection of studio portraits of entertainers, actors and actresses who performed on the American and British stage in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

THE BARRETTS- -I worked with Harry “POP” Barrett for a period of four weeks in the year of 1908. Somehow or other I didn’t fit in Harry’s act and was let out after four weeks, three of them having been spent in rehearsals. Harry Barrett if still living–and I hope he is–was a fine old juggler. He started off his career as a club juggler. Club jugglers of that day did not do the routines presented at a later date. In those days it seems that swinging clubs was in vogue and after a few deft moves with the swinging clubs he would go into a routine with one club, snaking it through the arms over the back and around the neck, from that he would go into a two club routine duplicating the same moves only with two instead of one club. His clubs for this routine were made somewhat like the present day clubs except that they were much heavier and the butt ends were bell shaped, the bell bottoms taking to some extent the place of the knobs on the handle end. Many of the intricate moves of snaking the clubs were done by grasping the butt ends, necessitating the bell bottoms. Someone at that time thought up the idea of juggling three clubs. Undoubtedly it was considered at that time to be sensational. Harry and his brother Joe did a two man juggling act. Later, Harry’s son Charles joined the act -making it a trio. While playing an amusement park date at Syracuse, N.Y., Pop bought a cheap straw hat such as farmers used in that period. While back stage he idly tossed the hat in the air. He noticed a tendency of the hat to return to him boomerang fashion. In the course of his act that day without any practice Pop tried out the stunt on his audience. They were amused and encouraged him. The stunt became a principal part of Pop’s act from that time on. After many months of trial and error he developed numerous tricks new to the juggling field. A good many of the tricks must be given credit where credit was due. Pop had a habit of changing partners quite often, these partners were instrumental in developing new tricks for Harry’s act. I believe

Moran and Wiser worked with Barrett and if I’m wrong forgive me. To the best of my recollection Moran and Wiser developed the spinning hats for which they are still famous. Spinning the hats was done by placing the index finger in the inner rim of the hat– where the sweat band is –and tossing them boomerang fashion over the head of the audience and returning to the fingers again. After all these years it is still something to see.

Jim Baggett of The Elgins was a partner of the Barretts and also contributed his share of hat tricks. There are many ways of juggling straw hats and while Barrett was the first one to use them in a juggling act, Moran and Wiser set the fashion in hat spinning, THE HARDDIGS, now deceased, invented the head to head passing of hats tossing them to each other in a forward and flat motion to each other’s head and lighting there, being off with the left hand and passed to the right and then to the partner again. A very fine applause getter and good for laughs. Frear, Baggett and Frear also used hats in their baseball act. The Dewey Bros. To the best of my knowledge were the first to use derby hats as means of getting tricks out of them, using them in somewhat the same manner as straw hats.

Well someone had to start the ball rolling, and some one did originate this and that trick and bits of comedy.

But each trick -and each bit of comedy has been suggested by someone or something that has been done before by someone else. In other words, one idea suggests another, and presto- A new baby is born- perhaps twins. I think it little behooves any of us to say, “That fellow stole my stuff. I originated that trick or piece of business. Wait till I see him”. And it may be that you did originate that trick. So what? Are you not using some trick originated by someone else also? So, steady boys, think back— where did you get your original idea?

Getting back to Pop Barrett. Pop used to have a happy time in telling of the jumps of his day. After working in a Wine room – equivalent to our present day nightclubs – for four or five weeks of months at maybe fifteen dollars a week, he would jump to Syracuse, do the same stunt there for a few weeks, then to Chicago, and then San Francisco. After playing Frisco they would hop a freight back East, lay around till all the money was gone, go to work making cigars, getting tired of that they would get the act ready again and repeat the same routine. Great stuff, sez I.

September 1897–almonte gazette

Prize for a farmers daughters pie..:)

The Almonte Fair has a long  history that is older than Almonte.–click- http://almontefair.ca/jpb/history/

Clippings and Photos of the 1958 Almonte Turkey Fair

Are You Ever too Old to Go to The Rural Fair? — Almonte

The 1947 Almonte Flood

Nellie Thurston –Balloonist Maiden Voyage in McFarlane Grove

The Lumsden Family at the Ottawa Exhibition 1899

HISTORY OF LANARK TOWNSHIP AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION –Laurie Yuill Part 4-“the proprietor of a merry-go-round was paid a bonus to bring his machine to the Fair “

Keyes Building Fire Bridge Street 1897

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Keyes Building Fire Bridge Street 1897
Photo Before- Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
07 Dec 1897, Tue  •  Page 8
After-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Alternative reading

Keyes Building Then and Now

Have You Been to the Keyes Building? Here is Your Chance

Under Lock and Keyes- Keyes Building

The Old Grocery Counter –Calvin Moore

Memories of Argue’s Food Market?

The Smiths Falls Storm of 1897

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The Smiths Falls Storm of 1897

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Virtual Reference Library

July 31 1897

The Smith’s Falls Echo of Wednesday had the following article:

Yesterday afternoon between four and five o’clock Smith’s Falls had an experience never before witnessed—at least not within the memory of the oldest inhabitant. Threatening dark clouds loomed up rather suddenly, and soon the rain commenced. After a little it was mixed with hail. A few minutes more and it gathered force, the hail and rain fairly tumbling down, until the streets from sidewalk to sidewalk were like raging rivers.

The hail at first was about the size of marbles, but after a little the size increased until as large as pigeons’ eggs, with an occasional one as large as a hen’s egg. This continued for a good half hour, when it ceased as suddenly as it began, and the floods went down. The sultriness was gone and the carpet of round balls necessarily gave a healthy arctic tone to the atmosphere.

The gardens were practically ruined, and the destruction of glass was immense, considering there was only a moderate find at the time. Every bit of glass in the skylights of the four photograph galleries in town was smashed, and even the heavy plate in the skylight of Rideau Chambers succumbed.

Nearly every house suffered more, or less. St. Andrew’s church suffered with the rest. Fortunately the area of the hail storm was not large. On the west of the town it scarcely extended beyond the houses ; on the north it did not extend to the semaphore, though Shawville seemed to be the centre of it ; it only extended out the Lombardy road a short distance; down the river on the south side there was rain only; on the north side the hail reached as far down as Peter Moir’s, where it did considerable damage. We have been told that E. Lemix, J. Foster and one or two others on that line will be heavy losers owing to the destruction of crops.

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

 

 

The Storm of June 1899

Ya call that a Snowstorm? Linda’s Mailbag

Storms of Carleton Place- Which One?

Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

The Day The Wizard of Oz Came to Carleton Place

To All the Snowmageddons I Have Loved Before

Lightening Strikes Again –The Storm of 1972

 

 

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Was it Murder?

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Was it Murder?

 

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The following dispatches are taken from the daily papers, and explain themselves:

Arnprior, July- 23, 1897—There continues to be a good deal of talk about the recent death of William Robinson, and possibly a murder trial may be the outcome, although so far no one seems to know anything very definite about the circumstances. Robinson came here from Carleton Place and was an employee of McLachlin Bros, here. He boarded at Mrs. Comba’s boarding house,  on Daniel street.

On Monday evening, July 6th, three young men called at his boarding house and asked for him. He went away with them to Braeside. There they got liquor, and the people were much disturbed by their quarrelling and fighting all night. The next morning Robinson’s corpse was found on the C.P.R. track by some of Gillies’ men, frightfully cut up. An inquest was not held, and the body was buried in the Arnprior cemetery in the afternoon.

One of the men who called on Robinson and went with him to Braeside was employed in Gillies Bros’ Mills. He was discharged the day Robinson’s body was found, and has left here. But it is said the case has been taken up by persons who learned of the circumstances, and that a detective’s services w ill be called into requisition to investigate Robinson’s death thoroughly.

P e r t h , July 25th.— Michael Allan, whose name has been ominously mentioned in connection with the mysterious death of William Robinson, of Arnprior, appeared before the county judge yesterday, charged with criminally assaulting Elizabeth Scobie, a girl 14 years of age. He pleaded not guilty. Interviewed as to his knowledge of Robinson’s death, he said that on Monday evening about six o’clock, he, together with a fellow employee in Gillies’ mill at Braeside, a young chap named Duncan McCrae. and a Frenchman named  “Joe,” started for Arnprior, three miles distant.

 

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McLachlin Bros, Public Archives Photo

There McCrae called for William Robinson, the deceased, at his boarding house, and after a few drinks had been digested the four started back for Braeside on foot. Allan says he was asleep but cannot be sure. The last he saw of Robinson was before he retired. Allan quotes Mrs. Primeau as his authority for saying that Robinson arose about four a.m. and told Mrs. Primeau that he was going to return to his work in Arnprior.

About 4:00 am Robinson’s shattered remains were found a short distance from Braeside on the railroad track leading to Arnprior. Allan says that on the previous night Robinson’s object in coming with the others to Braeside was to look for employment in the Braeside mills, but as Robinson left on Tuesday morning so early he (Robinson) must have changed his mind about looking after it that morning.

 

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

 

relatedreading

Murder or Accident — Bates & Innes Flume

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Not Guilty in the Murder of His Grandmother –George Watt Jr.

Fame and Murder Came to Balderson in 1828

The Thomas Easby Murders in 1829 — Foulest Ever in Lanark County

Murder in Carleton Place –Peter Cairns

The Buck Lake Murderer

The Media Then and Now–Johnny Gillies Had a Gun

Shocking Murder in Almonte–Michigan Charlie

Murder on Maple Island

Bitten by the Kissing Bug — A Shocking Conclusion to the Life of Carleton Place’s Daniel E. Sheppard

The Tale of a Pirate named Bill Johnston with Pirate Dog Supermodels

Assassinated Gossip about Lincoln, Payne and the Thousand Islands

The Man Who Would Be The Revenant

Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

Did Samuel Pittard of Ashton Murder His Wife?

 

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It Raineth Every Day in Lanark County–Social Notes–July 30, 1897

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It Raineth Every Day in Lanark County–Social Notes–July 30, 1897

 

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A trio of young men from Almonte attracted by the bright illumination’
in the sky on Tuesday evening, the night the car shops were burned in
Carleton Place, drove over to watch the fire, but when they got there the
fire was all out and the streets deserted. They felt greatly disappointed,
and were going to interview the mayor about it had they not been assured that it was altogether an oversight on the part of the C.P .R. officials in not notifying them in time.

 

On Tuesday last a severe thunderstorm passed over a portion of Darling
township. Mr. D. Barr was busy in the hay field coiling up hay when the storm came, and two or three minutes after he left the field and at the last coil he put up was struck with lightning and burned.

 

 

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A number of Almonte’s young men have established a camp on the shore of the Mississippi below “Wylie’s Dam,” where they will spend the hot season. They are said to be great entertainers, and are showing hospitality to numerous visitors from town.

 

With fine weather on Saturday Almonte will show its sympathy with the plan to give telephone connection with Clayton by sending out a crowd for the “ telephone picnic.” An interesting feature will be a baseball match between the Almonte and Lanark nines.

A few local nimrods made an expedition up the river last week to try their luck among the finnies, and many and lengthy are the stories now told. One party, after being on the river a short while, suddenly remembered that they had no bait. They rowed back and dropped their anchor—a 16-pounder—and proceeded to catch minnows. When they had caught sufficient for their trip the strongest man of the party was put at the oars so that they might catch up with the rest of the crowd. He pulled a good stroke and did not spare himself any, but progress was very slow, and it was not until they reached Gleason’s Bay that they noticed they had forgotten to pull in the anchor!

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Word comes that Mr. Thomas Haley’s buildings, near Ferguson’s Falls, were struck by the great storm of Tuesday and consumed. The Hawthorne Factory in Carleton Place was nipped at the roof.

 

Burglars last Sunday night entered the residence of Mr. J. H. Spencer,  stole $33 from his pant’s pockets in his bedroom, and set fire to his woodshed.

 

WATSON

Perth Remembered

Watson’s Corner’s News

The Ladies’ Aid of St. James will hold a social on July 5th.
Miss Ray Scott, of Fallbrook, spent Saturday and Sunday at home.

Mr. James Fair is shipping a few loads of sheep and pigs this week.
Miss M. Reid, of McDonald’s Corners, spent Saturday and Sunday at
home.

Rev. J. A. and Mrs. Leitch have gone to Renfrew for a couple of
weeks.

Miss A. Fife, of McDonald’s Corners, spent a few days with friends in
our village.

Mr. Henry Barrie has gone to Lanark to undergo an operation on one
of his eyes.

Mr. and Mrs. C. Donaldson paid a visit to Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Craig on
Saturday last.

The weather is warm though the nights continue cool. Quite a refreshing
shower fell on Thursday forenoon last.

Mrs. J. Borrowman and her sister, Miss A. Dick, of Drummond, paid a
visit to their sister, Mrs. Wm. McChesney, last week.

The sacrament of the Lord’s Supper was dispensed in St. James church on
Sabbath last. The church was crowded. Rev. J. A. Leitch preached an
impressive sermon from 1 Peter 4:13.

A baptismal service was held at the home of Mr. Stephen Park on Friday
afternoon last, when Rev. J. A, Leitch baptized 21 children and
adults. Elders Barr and Paul were present, besides a number of the parents
and others, there being between forty and fifty at the service.

A school children’s picnic will be held at Dalhousie Lake on Wednesday
of this week. By the way, the lake is getting to be a popular resort,
and deservedly so. Its beautiful scenery cannot easily be surpassed.
Take a day or more and go to Dalhousie Lake to admire the beauties of
nature and be lifted nearer to nature’s God.

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

Appleton Social Notes 1908 –Names Names Names

Christmas Social Notes from Pakenham 1933

Social Notes from Watson’s Corners

Smiles of Content and Social Notes in Clydesville

Social Note Shenanigans from the Almonte Gazette June 1899

Watson’s Corners And Vicinity 1891–Shetland Ponies and Cheese

It’s the Watson’s Corners News 1895!

 

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From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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From January to June–The Year of Earthquakes 1897

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Earthquake monitoring began in Canada in the late 1800s. The first known, instrumentally detected earthquake in Canada was the March 23, 1897  in the Montreal-area event, recorded on a 3-component seismograph at McGill University in Montreal, Québec (QC). The first continuously operating seismographs in Canada were located in Toronto, Ontario (ON) (installed September, 1897) and Victoria, BC (starting September 3, 1898). These were low-gain Milne seismographs (most sensitive to large, distant earthquakes), which were a part of the global network established by the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

From January to June of 1897 various earthquakes were listed throughout our area.

June 4 1897-Almonte Gazette
A severe shock of earthquake was felt in Almonte about a quarter past
ten o’clock last Thursday night. Mr. D. M. Fraser held his watch in hand
and said the rumbling and shock lasted about 45 seconds.

About eleven o’clock a minor shock was felt. Several ladies who were attending
the theatres in Montreal fainted through fear and had to be carried
out. In Almonte dishes rattled, doors flew open, and many of our female
citizens were badly scared.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

 

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal, 10 Jul 1911, Mon, Page 3 What happened to a local Perth gal when she came back to Canada after the San Francisco earthquake.

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

 

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal28 May 1897, FriPage 1

 

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal02 Jan 1897, SatPage 7

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Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune31 Mar 1897, WedPage 5

 

 

January 13 1888

 

On Wednesday morning of this week, between three and four o’clock, two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt throughout Almonte, with an interval of a few seconds between each shock. The first was the more violent of the two* and lasted several minutes. It was sufficiently strong enough to vibrate buildings. Many of our townspeople felt the quake, and it caused many of them to quake also.

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Clipped from The Ottawa Journal20 Feb 1971, SatPage 22

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)