Tag Archives: 1800’s

Dupont’s Mill Street Restaurant Renovated 1899

Standard
Dupont’s Mill Street Restaurant Renovated 1899

 

paving_mill_street (1).jpg

Photo of Mill Street from Almonte.com

 

iJCkUbQaQ%6iHATqTTUhzQ_thumb_f174.jpg

A night time streetscape in downtown Almonte taken in 1996. Some things have changed, some have not. 🙂 Photo Paul Latour

 

Almonte Gazette 1899

What a metamorphosis may wrought by a judicious and tasteful use of wallpaper and paint is shown by the transformation which has been made in the interior of Mr. A. Dupont’s, Mill St. restaurant. For the past week or so the change has been going on gradually until now with dainty wallpaper, fresh paint and new oilcloth this favourite resort has been converted into an exceedingly neat and tasty shop.


A soda water fountain has been installed, a refrigerator for keeping bottled drinks put in, and everything possible done for convenience and comfort. Upstairs, the winter lunch rooms have been turned into a veritable fairy bower, with tables for two or tables for four, where ice cream, sodas and other summer drinks and delicacies will be served.

 

june21899.jpg

June 2 1899 Almonte Gazette

 

In the days before home freezers and rapid transit, suggested family menus were grouped by season and presented for each day. Breakfast would have been served between 8-9AM. Dinner would have been the main meal of the day, served sometime between noon and three. Winter rooms were upstairs when it became colder to dine at the first level and equipped with fireplaces.

 

images (20).jpeg

Queen Street Google Image

Altogether “Ab.” has reason to be proud of his premises and customers know that when
they go there they will find what they want and get it right. Nor has Queen street shop been overlooked. It too has been put in shape for the summer trade, and will also be found well fitted for the requirements. Will ensure the best of satisfaction to customers^ A full range of candies, traits, nuts, canned goods, etc., always kept in stock; also ice cream, ice cream sodas and all kinds of temperance drinks.

Women in the company of male escorts were welcome at restaurants. Lunch tended to be reserved for professional and business men who either found it inconvenient to return home or wanted to meet friends and contacts. Evening meals were more festive and provided a chance for couples to show off.  Restaurants started to cater to female shoppers who wanted lunch in the late 1800s. Establishments began offering ice cream and lighter fare and opened up near dry-goods emporiums like Ab Dupont did with his second restaurant on Mill Street. This was thought to attract women as well as the key item that they did not serve alcohol.

 

Typical Temperance Drinks

 

 

 - Almonte Almonte, July 20. Mr. Lome Steele has...

Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 20 Jul 1899, Thu,
  3. Page 7
  4.  - Almonte Almonte; July 2S. Mr. George Bradford...

    Clipped from

    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 26 Jul 1899, Wed,
    3. Page 7
    4. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

       

       

      relatedreading

       

      What Was the David Harum Ice Cream Sundae Sold in Lanark County?

    5. Did you Know that Temperance Drinks Are all the Rage Now?

Dust on the Wind –Ashton Social Notes 1887-1897 Names Names Names

Standard
Dust on the Wind –Ashton Social Notes 1887-1897 Names Names Names

 

 

31867850264_d876684b51_b.jpg

Photo-Fiveprime

 - ASHTON, Sugar Making la Again In Full Swing. ;...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Apr 1897, Thu,  Page 5

 - ASHTON. Engineer Engaged Locating a Proper...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Aug 1897, Fri,  Page 3

 

 Beckwith Councilor Faye Campbell added: Just wanted to tell you that Robert Presley, who operated the saw mill in the Village of Ashton, was my great grandfather

 

 - ASHTON. The Lacrosse Club Gives a Concert '. ....

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Mar 1897, Wed,  Page 5

 

Image result for ashton ontario old

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  07 May 1897, Fri,  Page 2

 

 - Ashton. Building operations are beginning to...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Apr 1887, Thu,  Page 3

 - ASHTON. Accident to a Bridal Party. A Timely...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  14 Oct 1896, Wed,  Page 3

 - - ' . ASHTON. March 16. Master Harry Burns and...

 - ASHTON. The Templars Have a Successful Picnic...

 - naviog procured J & cumber of row boats, the...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Sep 1897, Wed,  Page 5

 - ASHTON. Two Local Skaters Have Their S leafs...

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  24 Feb 1897, Wed,  Page 2

Canadian Thanksgiving in the Valley in November??? It’s true!!

Standard
Canadian Thanksgiving in the Valley in November??? It’s true!!

 

a067302-v8.jpg

Somewhere in Lanark County

Lower Canada and Upper Canada observed Thanksgiving on different dates; for example, in 1816 both celebrated Thanksgiving for the termination of the war of 1812 between France, the U.S. and Great Britain, with lower Canada marking the day on May 21 and upper Canada on June 18.

 In 1838, Lower Canada used Thanksgiving to celebrate the end of the Lower Canada Rebellion. Following the rebellions, the two Canadas were merged into a united Province of Canada, which observed Thanksgiving six times from 1850 to 1865.

The first Thanksgiving Day after Canadian Confederation was observed as a civic holiday on April 5, 1872, to celebrate the recovery of the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) from a serious illness.

For many years before it was declared a national holiday in 1879, Thanksgiving was celebrated in either late October or early November. From 1879 onward, Thanksgiving Day has been observed every year, the date initially being a Thursday in November. After World War I, an amendment to the Armistice Day Act established that Armistice Day and Thanksgiving would, starting in 1921, both be celebrated on the Monday of the week in which November 11 occurred.

Ten years later, in 1931, the two days became separate holidays, and Armistice Day was renamed Remembrance Day. From 1931 to 1957, the date was set by proclamation, generally falling on the second Monday in October, except for 1935, when it was moved due to a general election.  In 1957, Parliament fixed Thanksgiving as the second Monday in October. The theme of the Thanksgiving holiday also changed each year to reflect an important event to be thankful for. In its early years it was for an abundant harvest and occasionally for a special anniversary

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Nov 1897, Sat,  Page 12

 

ALMONTE

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Nov 1897, Sat,  Page 12

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  27 Nov 1897, Sat,  Page 12

 

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

 

relatedreading

Thanksgiving Was Once a Day of Insulting Authority?

A Butterball of a Thanksgiving Story

Canadian Thanksgiving Recipes For the Very Weird – Thanksgiving Poutine and Cherpumple

 

My Thanksgiving Treats for Kids –RICE KRISPIE FAUX APPLES – GUMMY WORM SURPRISE

 

The Thanksgiving Turkey- Food With a Face

 

 

download (3).jpg

Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

 

halloweendd.jpg

 

Here we go Carleton Place– Mark Your Calendars–
Friday October the 13th– 6:30.. meet in front of the old Leland Hotel on Bridge Street (Scott Reid’s office) and enjoy a one hour Bridge Street walk with stories of murder mayhem and Believe it or Not!!. Some tales might not be appropriate for young ears. FREE!–

Join us and learn about the history under your feet! This year’s St. James Cemetery Walk will take place Thursday October 19th and october 21– Museum Curator Jennfer Irwin will lead you through the gravestones and introduce you to some of our most memorable lost souls!
Be ready for a few surprises along the way
.
This walk takes place in the dark on uneven ground. Please wear proper footwear and bring a small flashlight if you like.
Tickets available at the Museum, 267 Edmund Street. Two dates!!!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1211329495678960/

OCT 28th
Downtown Carleton Place Halloween Trick or Treat Day–https://www.facebook.com/events/489742168060479/

unnamed (1)

 

 

 

October 13, 2013 – Thanksgiving– Breast Cancer Awareness Month

She Came Back! A Ghost Divorce Story

Standard
She Came Back! A Ghost Divorce Story

83276435.jpg

A True Story from the Newspaper Archives 1897

When Miss Rippledeane married Mr. Baldwin in 1897 he was a widower. The marriage hit the skids pretty quickly and Mrs. Baldwin brought suit for divorce. It must have baffled the lawyers and judge as the grounds was because a ghost of former Mrs. Baldwin, his first wife, insisted on still jointly sharing the house and interfering with their matrimonial happiness in spirit.

Mrs. Baldwin insisted she was once a cheerful healthful woman, and now she was in a nervous frame of mind altogether owing to the ghostly persecutions of her husband’s former wife.

Apparently the former missus was waiting for the new missus the day they got married and the new bride saw her standing in the doorway dressed in white waiting for the new couple. The new Mrs. Baldwin asked her new husband who the lady was and he said he saw nothing of the sort. She thought he was jesting and upon giving the description of the ghostly vision the maidservant gave way to emotion declaring it was none other than the dead wife herself, Rosamond Baldwin.

Since that initial encounter the ghost followed her wherever she went, pinching her, pulling her hair, and causing her to cry out in front of guests. To collect further evidence she called for her sister Miss Anna Rippledeane to come visit, not telling her that the former Mrs. Baldwin was still calling her former residence home. One day Anna screamed in fright insisting that she too saw the lady in white. She made her new brother-in-law search for the ghost under the bed, which was futile.

In Mrs. Baldwin’s suit she claimed she once overheard her husband begging: “Rosamond please go away and leave him in peace”. Upon being interviewed Mr. Baldwin refused to speak about the incident. But, the divorce suit was brought forward and will determine whether Mrs. Baldwin is entitled to a divorce and whether Mr. Baldwin is creating bigamy by having one under the quick and even the dead.  if the divorce has granted Mr. Baldwin has assured his current wife that he will not marry again.

 

 

womenperil.jpg

Another sad Baldwin Tale

 

img.jpg

1037_410_831_141

Clipped from The Inter Ocean,  26 Apr 1889, Fri,  Page 7

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

 

relatedreading

 

To Be Manic Depressive in a Rural Town — Kingston Insane Asylum

The Insane Spinster Ghost of Appleton Ontario

Embroidery of the Insane?

The Fires of 1897

Standard
The Fires of 1897

20013 06 20 Ste-E.JPG           The first Sainte Euphemie Church was built in 1886.

 

Searching for something else today I came across countless articles of brush fires. I wondered if there was a drought and nope, that was in 1891. The worst was the complete destruction of Casselman in 1897.

In 1897, the entire village of Casselman, including the church, was destroyed by fire

Casselman Fires

In July 1891, St. Euphémie Parish had its first great disaster: fire destroyed part of the village, the Casselman Lumber Co., and millions of feet of woodcut. A large number of workmen had to leave town in order to find work elsewhere. However, the fire transformed lots that had been only partly cleared until then into fertile prairies. Many new settlers came to Casselman to work its highly arable agricultural land.

On October 5, 1897, the Parish faced the greatest tragedy of its history: a terrible fire destroyed the entire Casselman area. Except for a very few homes, the village was reduced to ashes and its inhabitants were left homeless and lost all of their personal belongings. The Catholic church was completely destroyed save for the Holy Sacrament, which was rescued by the Vicar, Father Joseph-Hercule Touchette. Many families had to leave town due to the loss of all their belongings. However, strengthened by Father Touchette’s encouraging words as well as donations from many parts of Ontario and Quebec, those that remained took on the arduous task of rebuilding their community. Two days after the fire, a committee was formed to oversee the reconstruction of the Parish church.

In July 1919, the Parish again fell victim to a devastating fire. The buildings bordering the main street of the town were engulfed in flames, and almost everything was destroyed. Several tradesmen of the time lost a great part of their merchandise and equipment. Those who succeeded in saving part of their goods moved them into the church or the Town Hall. The church, the bank and the store of Damase Racine were saved thanks to the effective work of firemen from Ottawa. Within the following days, the townspeople courageously undertook the rebuilding of the main street.

 

e010698057-v8.jpg

 

e010698058-v8.jpg

 

 

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle,  06 Oct 1897, Wed,  Page 1

img.jpg

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Oct 1897, Fri,  Page 3

 

historicalnotes

 

 

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Oct 1897, Tue,  Page 7

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Oct 1897, Tue,  Page 7

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Oct 1897, Tue,  Page 7

cbcbc

img.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  12 Oct 1897, Tue,  Page 7

 

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

The Drought of 1871 and the Mills on the Mississippi River

What Do You Know About the Burnt Lands?

When Crops Failed — Lanark County Went Manitoba Dreamin’

The Old Woman Who Walked From Perth?

Standard
The Old Woman Who Walked From Perth?

 

StPat.jpg

A number of Catholic institutions were clustered around St.Patrick’s Church, a hall, an asylum for the elderly, and an orphans’ home.–Urbsite

 

Catherine Kelly of Perth was arrested in the 2nd week of May 1898. Why was she arrested? Well, here is her story.

 

With a faded brown shawl wrapped around her shoulders and wearing a black bonnet and dress Mrs. Catherine Kelly from Perth walked into the Ottawa Police Department that week of May in 1898. With slow steps and a feeble voice the 70 year-old  told the officers that she had walked from Perth to gain admittance to the *St. Patricks Asylum/Home.

The old woman told Constable Joliet after he had found her wandering along Elgin Street that she had walked 100 miles from Perth and it had taken her over a month to complete her journey. She said she collapsed on Richmond Road and a stranger had picked her up and taken her to a nearby farm for nourishment.
Mrs. Kelly’s husband had died 10 years previous and she instantly became penniless and had to live with distant relatives. She grew weary she said of bad treatment and had decided to make her to Ottawa to St. Patricks but they had refused her. The old woman slept in the cell over night and was provided food.

The next day her story began to unravel. Apparently the farmer from Richmond had driven her to Ottawa the day she got picked up on Elgin Street. She did indeed get admitted to St. Patrick’s before but she had made such a disturbance they had asked her to leave.  On fact she had been taken in twice before and left on her own free will.The woman was considered  by the nuns unruly and addicted to the use of bad language.

I don’t know about you but after looking at the St. Patrick’s ‘home’ and everyone abandoning me I might have used bad language too.

 

Screenshot 2017-05-07 at 16.jpg

MIKAN no. 3319467 St. Patrick’s Asylum, Ottawa, Ontario. October 1874, Ottawa, Ontario – corner of Maria & Kent Credit: Topley Studio Fonds / Library and Archives Canada / PA-059228

 

historicalnotes

 

Screenshot 2017-05-07 at 16.jpg

 

*St. Patrick’s Orphanage and Asylum was founded in 1865 as “a House of Refuge for the Irish poor.” It was established by an Association of Members of St. Patrick’s Church (Kent St, Ottawa), and was run by the Grey Sisters of the Cross. It housed orphaned children and homeless elderly persons. The original building (corner of Laurier Avenue and Kent St) was torn down years ago, but there is still a St Patrick’s Home in Ottawa (Riverside Drive)

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

“Dominique, nique, nique s’en allait tout simplement”–The Pembroke Grey Nuns

 

I am a Laundry Girl

Women in Peril– Betrayed by Heartless Scoundrels 1882

The Home for Friendless Women

 

 

Jaan KolkCatherine Kelly was was picked up – described as “helplessly intoxicated” – on May 17, and told her story in court May 20. By her account, she had left Perth a month earlier and only arrived in Ottawa that week, but according to St. Patrick’s Home staff, she had been driven to Ottawa by Mr. Bearman of Bell’s Corners and admitted April 23.
From the Journal, May 23, 1898:
Jaan KolkIn court May 20, Magistrate O’Gara ordered her sent back to Perth.


Tammy Marion
31m  · 

Linda Seccaspina – From the Ottawa Journal – May.23rd,.1898. Something to add to her story
Jaan Kolk
18h  · 

From the Journal, May 20, 1898

Tammy Marion
18m  · 

Linda Seccaspina – I wonder what ever became of her Linda. If she stayed in Perth then, passed there? The Judge ordered that she be sent back to Perth. From the Journal – May.20th. 1898.

A.C. Burgess “Dining Hall Carleton Place” 1885

Standard
A.C. Burgess “Dining Hall Carleton Place” 1885

18302109_10155106510602184_584595195_n.jpg

Thanks to Jennifer Ferris for sending these images which were probably from the C.P.R Restaurant in Carleton Place 1885

18302276_10155106510577184_823576793_n

Photos thanks to Jennifer E Ferris. Thank you Jennifer! She also sent maps of where Henry Lang’s barn was located too. Check it out. Henry Lang and His Lanark County Magic Barn?

2885_3981_534_323.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  28 Mar 1900, Wed,  Page 7

2025_4012_619_370.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  21 Jun 1893, Wed,  Page 1

Since his brother was kind of crazy — it looks like it ran in the family The Crazy Town World of Mr. George Arthur Burgess of Carleton Place

16298654_10154621435396886_4230877440921854727_n (2).jpg

Newspaper —Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum — 

3278_2636_648_183.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  13 Jul 1896, Mon,  Page 7

2711_1559_597_387.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Oct 1889, Wed,  Page 1

historicalnotes

2025_7682_788_90.jpg

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  23 Sep 1896, Wed,  Page 2

Arklan Island

It was bought by A. C. Burgess in 1887 and after improvements, was leased again as a sawmill. The name Arklan was provided by Mr. Burgess, who a little earlier had begun developing his model stock farm on the adjoining farm land. His brother, G. Arthur Burgess, mayor of Carleton Place in 1903 and 1921, and at times a stormy petrel in municipal affairs, installed a small hydro electric plant at Arklan in 1909 and for about a year supplied a part of the town’s power for electric lighting purposes, leasing his installations in 1912 to the town’s other supplier of electric power.-More Notes about the Mysterious Arklan Farm

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun and Screamin’ Mamas (USA)

relatedreading

Arthur Burgess Closes Carleton Place C.P.R. Restaurant

The Crazy Town World of Mr. George Arthur Burgess of Carleton Place

Before The Carleton Place Mews?

Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

The Auction of the Year in Carleton Place

The Wall Mysteries of Lake Ave East -Residential Artists

More Notes about the Mysterious Arklan Farm

Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter

Standard
Mrs. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay Makes Butter
front1.jpg
Before–Black and white photograph from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum of 56 Front Street. Known as the Joseph Yuill house from: Standing on Front Street

 Some Valuable Advice From Mr. Joseph Yuill of Ramsay—January 1, 1890
From the Mercury we learn that the meeting of the South Renfrew Farmers’ Institute, held lately in Renfrew, was by far the most successful ever held in that riding. This success was due a a large measure to the presence of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Yuill, of Ramsay, who have become well-known to be among our best butter-makers.

Mr. Yuill gave an address on “’Practical Butter-Making.’ Be said four things must be done to eusure good butter—two by the men and two by the women. We must have the light breed (Mr. Y. believes in the Ayrshire breed). The food and water must be pure and wholesome. Milk contains 87 per cent, of water, and therefore no dirty water should be given to a cow to drink. The cows must be milked at regular intervals, and not vary, as to time, even as little as five minutes. An inexperienced hand will not obtain as much milk from a cow as one who is skilled in milking. A cow should be milked perfectly dry.

Milk should never be put in wooden vessels, but in tin ones. The milk cans should be 20 inches deep and 8 inches in diameter, and should be placed in water at a temperature of 40 degrees. This will necessitate the keeping of ice. The cream should be dipped of with a ladle, no harm being done if a little of the milk goes with it. The cream is then put in a suitable place to ripen, which will take about 36 hours. If hurried the butter will be soft, and if left too long the cream becomes bitter. He favoured a little butter colouring. Above all things cleanliness should be rigidly adhered to, not only in the case of all vessels used, but also in the food and drink given to the cows.

A brush should be used in cleaning cans, and they should be dried, not with a cloth, but by the sun while they are lying on their sides. About one ounce of salt should be used to each pound of butter. Less salt, is required for butter intended for the English market. When intended for a distant market, butter should be put up in tinnets of about 60 lbs. No pickle should be placed on butter, as it forms there itself.

0c54c945b5019158a0eb88b2b150e8a2.jpg

The tinnet should be made of white ash or oak. No air should be allowed to enter the tinnet through spaceswhile the butter is being packed. The different churnings of batter should be pressed very hard into the tub, and the centre slightly elevated, that the brine may run to the sides. He objected to the practice followed by merchants of piercing the butter, as it lets in the air, and also of running off the brine.

Mr. Yuill gave the following directions for preparing the tub for packing : Do not soak it at the well for several days, or under the drop from the eaves, but soak it in buttermilk for 12 hours, pour this off, wash the tub clean and fill with salt and water and leave it for 12 hours. Change the brine then, and leave it other 12 hours.

historicalnotes

Mr. Charles MunroWell known in the Clayton District where he was born in April 10, 1892 a son of the late Daniel Munro and his wife Betsy Rintoul, passed. away early Sunday morning Nov. 25, 1962. He was married Jan. 29, 1919 to Jean Yuill and have resided ever since on their farm in Darling Township. He was a life long member of Guthrie United Church and was active in all church work. The many floral and memorial offerings testified the high esteem in which the deceased was held. Mr. Munro Is survived by his wife the former Jean Yuill and one son Donald and a daughter (Della) Mrs. Thomas Ireton of Ferguson’s Falls and three grandchildren, Charles Munro, and Brenda and Lillian Ireton. Also surviving are two brothers, John A. Munro of Lanark, Robt. D. Munro of Clayton and a sister, Mrs. Archie McNeil of Regina, Sask. Funeral services were held from the Kerry Funeral Home on Tuesday, Nov. 27. The Rev. Robert Clarke conducting the funeral services. The pallbearers were six nephews, Daniel Munro, Arthur Munro, Allie Yuill, Wilmer Pretty, Malcolm Stewart and Eric Munro. Interment was in the United Church Cemetery, Clayton.

 

Related Reading:

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Eggs 10 Cents a dozen–Farmers Markets of Smiths Falls and Almonte 1880 and 1889

Standard

 

8978806564_4ce76f5d24_b.jpg

AlmonteFarmersMarket Almonte Farmers Market – Al & Pat Watson’s Farm | by AlmonteFarmersMarket

June 15 1899–Almonte Gazette

The Almonte Market last Saturday was fairly well attended by producers. A few new commodities were offered, which were quickly sold to eager purchasers, but, with the exception of butter and eggs, there was no special demand for any one article, though everything was readily sold.

A large supply of rhubarb, lettuce and green vegetables of excellent quality sold quickly at 3 bunches for 10 cents. Some fresh fish from White Lake brought from 5 to 6c a pound. Other prices remain unchanged, and are as follows:

Butter, 15 to 17c lb –eggs 10c doz –potatoes 60 to 65c– a b a g ; parsnips, 4c. g a l.– carrots, 4c g a l.– green onions 4c a bunch– lettuce 4c a bunch– rhubarb 4c a bunch– or 3 bunches of any of these for 10c

Veal 5 to 6c lb– mutton, 7 to 8c lb.– beef 5 to 8c. lb — pork 6 to 7c. lb–hams, 7 to 8c. lb

eff3299e4f9da821577b62b198eff197.jpg

Men Working Tractor and Threshing Machine c1890

Hay, $9 to $10 per ton. The other prices in town this weekare : Wheat, soft, bush., 67 to 70c ; hard, 70 to 72c ; pease, 60c ; buckwheat, 40c ; oats, 30c; rye 40c ; barley, 35c ; bran, $14 per ton ; shorts, $16 ; provender, $16 to $20.

 

 

leachjamesfarm1902.jpg

The farm of James Leach, Montague Township, Ontario, Canada, in 1902-Bytown or Bust

 

Smith’s Falls as a Market January 1, 1880-Almonte Gazette-— Messra. Robert Yuill,-Geo. Dunlop and John Drynan, farmers in Ramsay, drove to Smith’s Falls with loads of grain, which they disposed of to everyones advantage. We certainly have reason to feel gratified that its town affords a market that attracts farmers from such a distance; but to us, if; appears as though there was something wrong in Almonte when three farmers living three or four miles distant find it profitable to convey their produce such a distance to realize the highest price. Almonte should be able to pay as high a price as Smith’s Falls.

 

carsww.jpg

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News and now in The Townships Sun

Related Reading:

Lanark Farm Life is Not so Bad- 1951

Once Upon a Time on the Farm

Farming Could be a Dangerous Business in Lanark County? Who Do You Know?

She Doesn’t Think My Tractor is Sexy–The Farmer’s Wife 1889

Tips From the Almonte Gazette “Travel Section” 1874

Standard

almonte-2

Photo from Almonte.com

1874–Almonte Gazette

1.Eat regularly thrice a day, and never between meals.

2. Take with you one third more-money than you calculate on spending.

3. Take small bills, rather than large, to avoid having bad money passed on you in change.

4. Aim to be at your place of starting at least ten minutes before meal time and -grow merry and wise at the contemplation o f the splutters and mishaps of those who come in at the last minute, and yell a minute later.

 

almonte-1

Photo from Almonte.com

 

5. See that your baggage is on the conveyance before you are yourself.

6. Remember that you make your character as you go along

7. Only bores are boisterous.

8. Do not let the servants excel you in patience and politeness

9. “ Please” should commence every request,. and “Thanks” every service done.

10. A lady is always gentle; a gentleman always composed.

11. Never argue on any subject if there are more than one present besides yourself.

12. Never fail to set that person down as ignorant or low-bred, Who, ‘by word of look, or gesture, disparages woman, a clergyman, the Bible or the Sabbath day.

 

desktop-1430425970.jpg

almonteg

Click here–Almonte Gazette

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in Hometown News

Related Reading:

TWO GIRLS FINISH LONG MOTOR TRIP-Eileen Snowden— Almonte

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place