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Postcards of Lanark County thanks to Sally Tuffin

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Postcards of Lanark County thanks to Sally Tuffin

I have been putting up her postcards for the last few weeks– now I am going to document them all. Thanks Sally Tuffin!

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This would be looking up the river from the town hall bridge. The left hand side would be where Spring St. Is now.

This is Metcalfe park at the base of Bay Hill looking up the river. The park was named after a Dr. Metcalfe. Postmarked Feb. 12, 1909. Both there’s two postcards were published by the Stedman Bros. store.

 

Postmarked Feb. 8, 1908. Published by M.R. MacFarlane in Almonte. These falls are up from Metcalfe Park where the river flows into the bay.

Bay Hill no publisher or postmark.

 

No publisher or postmark.

 

No.publisher or postmark.

Postmarked Feb. 1, 1910 published by Mrs. E. Grieg of Almonte.

 

Postmarked Sept.28, 1907. Unknown publisher.

Postmarked July 6, 1908, published by M.R. MacFarlane

Postmark July 19, 1906.

 

Postmarked Sept. 11, 1909. Published by M.R.MacFarlane.

Postmarked April 3, 1908. Published by M.R. MacFarlane.

Postmarked Aug. 22, 1907. Publisher unknown.

No date  unknown publisher.

 

Postmarked Feb. 1, 1915. Published by Stedman Bros.

Unmailed, no postmark

Postmarked Apr. 12, 1915 Published by Warwick Bros. & Ritter, Toronto, ON

 

 

Postmarked March 2, 1915. Published by Valentine’s and Sons Montreal and Toronto.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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Be Very Proud Carleton Place — Postcards and Booze

Debunking a Postcard 1913 — Strange Ephemera

A Postcard to Caldwell’s Mills

The Hidden Postcard Gallery in Carleton Place

Another Postcard Look at Carleton Place

Carleton Place 1912 Postcard

Carleton Place Postcard– What Year Was This Taken?

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Life in The House of Industry

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Life in The House of Industry

 

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1904

 

In the late 1800s Lanark County’s population was booming as railways and industries brought prosperity. But along with it came poverty, people had no place to go, and it was one thing after another, whether it was cholera, influenza, or diphtheria.

On February 2, 1903 the new House of Industry was erected by the county of Lanark on a seventy-eight-acre lot, immediately outside the limits of the town of Perth. It was opened by Rev. A. H. Scott, M.A., of St. Andrew’s Church, Perth, and Rev. Canon Mickelson, of St. James Church,  who were entrusted by the County Council with the dedication of the building.

The members of the Lanark Council, the clergy of Perth, and the mayors of adjoining municipalities dined together at noon, and after dinner the building was dedicated. After the dedication an examination was made of the different parts of the new structure. The general public was supplied with substantial refreshments during the afternoon and evening.

The upper storey of the building was converted into an auditorium from the platform of which addresses were delivered appropriate to the occasion. J. A. Stewart, LL.B., mayor of Perth, gave the first address, Hon. John Haggart, M.P., and Col Matheson M.L.A., both of Perth, followed. Mayor McKim, of Smiths Fallls  W. C. Caldwell, M.L.A., of Lanark; and Dr. Preston, of Carleton Place, were the other speakers. Judge Senkler presented Councillor Pattie the chairman of the building committee, with a souvenir chain of gold. The ceremony in connection was impressive and over two thousand people were present at the opening of the building.

The founders of the House of Industry were later criticized for a judgmental attitude that distinguished between the “deserving poor” (elderly people and invalids who were unable to work) and the “undeserving poor” (able-bodied people who couldn’t find a job because of such problems as alcoholism). But after researching the institution’s history they do deserve credit for helping people who were falling through the cracks. They really did make a difference.

The men slept separately and there was a dormitory upstairs for the women. In the morning they got some oatmeal and tea and then they were asked to contribute some labour. The women did some sewing and the men spent an hour or two chopping kindling, or working on their farm. Then they were expected to go and look for a job.

As a rule they tried to get the children out of the House at the age of about 14. They apprenticed some of the boys, and got places of service for the girls. It was not often boys and girts were put into the House of Industry who were of  a desirable class; when they were bright some relative generally took them. They kept no registry of what became of the children after they left the House, neither did they keep up correspondence with them.

The House of Industry was not known for gourmet fare. Staff were instructed that the soup should be nutritious, but not so tasty that people would be tempted to comeback for more. While some residents stayed just a few days, it soon became clear that others needed a permanent home.  Before the construction of this House of Industry in Perth the only alternative place to house indigent residents was in the county jail, so this was much better for the 90-100 people that lived there.

 

 

historicalnotes

 - pharmacy. Aa elderly woman who for sobu time wa...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 07 Feb 1907, Thu,
  3. Page 2

    The Corporation of the County of Lanark has had a long history in the provision of residential care for seniors and other people requiring residential services. It began in February 1903 when the doors to the House of Industry opened in the stone part of the building next door, now called Perth Community Care Centre. In 1966, the County sold this building (at that time it was called Tayview Home), and proceeded to build a brand new 110-bed home and named it Lanark Lodge. The doors opened in September 1967, and all the residents from Tayview were moved to the adjacent, newly built Lanark Lodge. There have been two major building and renovation projects since at Lanark Lodge. In 1974, an additional 66 beds were added. Immediately thereafter, Fairview Manor was built by the County of Lanark in Almonte, opening its doors in 1977 to keep pace with the growing waiting lists of seniors needing a home. Lanark Lodge was again renovated in 1988 with the addition of a new wing, and the old part of the building was subsequently renovated in 1990 to improve the standard of physical space. Subsequent to the latest renovation in 1990, Lanark Lodge reduced its capacity from 176 to 163 residents.

    Fairview Manor was divested to the Almonte General Hospital in the fall of 2004, leaving Lanark Lodge the sole long-term care home operated by the County of Lanark.

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  5.  House of Industry Kingston

    Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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  6. Did You Know About the House of Industry?

    Monument erected to honour 400 buried in unmarked grave

    Farmersville 1859 County Directory (Athens)

  7. House of Industry Athens Farmersville

The Lakes of Lanark County

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The Lakes of Lanark County

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I always question where is where and people have to help me out. Thanks to the school books from Doris Blackburn we have this great map of  reference where we know which lake or body of water is where in Lanark County.

 

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historicalnotes

 - Daring rescue brings reward ALMONTE (Special)...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 10 May 1978, Wed,
  3. [First] REVISION,
  4. Page 3 - Mississippi canoe event set for May 22 CARLETON...

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    2. 10 May 1978, Wed,
    3. [First] REVISION,
    4. Page 3

     - a poa- for PRIEST CHASED LIKE A THIEF Exporteoe...

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    1. The Ottawa Journal,
    2. 14 Feb 1906, Wed - a teen-aged WINTER OR SUMMER, they pull some...

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      1. The Ottawa Journal,
      2. 21 Feb 1959, Sat,
      3. Page 14 - , . FROM PERTH, we have received a brief...

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        1. The Ottawa Journal,
        2. 07 Feb 1959, Sat,
        3. Page 11

        Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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        Tales from Lake Park– A Disabled Motor and Manslaughter

      4. Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

      5. Family Photos– Mississippi Lake– Darlene Page

The Story of Ms. Kitty Marks

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The Story of Ms. Kitty Marks

 

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historicalnotes

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 - OTTAWA VALLEY DAYS 1 When Silk-Hatted Marks...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 24 Jul 1943, Sat,
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 - MRS. KITTY MARKS Famed Canadian Actress DieiS...

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  1. The Ottawa Journal,
  2. 03 Jan 1964, Fri,
  3. Page 11

 

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  3. Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte
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    Ontario’s Version of the Marks Bros-Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

    Peg O My Heart — Gracie Mark’s Belt

    What’s Happening at Christie Lake June 23, 1899

    The Killarney of Canada in Lanark County

Lanark County Recipes Beaver Tail and Muskrat — No thanks LOL

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Thanks to Doris Blackburn school handouts/ Karen Blackburn Chenier

 

 - Muskrat Recipes May Help Meat Shortage NEW...

 

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  1. Tallahassee Democrat,
  2. 07 Jan 1943, Thu,
  3. Page 2

 - "Muskrat Recipes" Had Purpose "Recipe for...

 

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  2. 23 Mar 1949, Wed,
  3. Page 4

 

 - "Muskrat Recipes" Had Purpose "Recipe for...

 

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  1. The Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune,
  2. 23 Mar 1949, Wed,
  3. Page 4

 

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 - One Indian recipe. Beaver tail beans, Is as...

 

 

 

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The Harold Kettles Series – Blowing up Beaver Dams in Beckwith

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historicalnotes

Ostler’s Store Plevna

The store did not sell fresh goods, fruits and vegetables or meat as these were produced locally. Dawson and Ostler also provided a market for customer’s goods including butter, eggs and fur (muskrat pelts earned $1.00 in the 20’s and mink $15.00). At Ostler’s you could buy licences, hunting for $1.00 and trapping for $5.00. Ostler’s later sold gas across the street, initially in gallon bottles then in tanks with glass tops.

Perth Courier, Feb. 19, 1897

John F. Cram and Sons bought over eight thousand muskrat pelts in one week from district trappers and collectors and sold them at their Mill Street tannery. To make way for the building of a new flour mill the John F. Cram tannery and wool plant was removed to Campbell Street at the corner of Lisgar ( which later became Hastie’s) after fourteen years of operation on Mill Street.

Game Law Enforcement-1884

Two unfortunate Indians were among those who felt the first punitive effects of the new society’s protective activity.  This local story was published in October of 1884:

“Last Wednesday two Indians from St. Regis were about to pack up and leave their camp between Appleton and Almonte, on the Mississippi River, when a representative of the Carleton Place Game, Fish and Insectivorous Birds Protective Society appeared on the spot and confiscated a number of muskrat skins.

The fellows had been warned by the Society to desist trapping the animals until November.  The two offenders were brought to Carleton Place.  They had in their possession 126 muskrat skins, one mink skin and one raccoon skin.  The taking of the latter is not an offence.  The poor fellows were in most destitute circumstances.

The magistrate inflicted a fine of $10 and costs and the skins were confiscated.  They doubtless intended to do the river above Carleton Place at once, as has been their annual custom.  The Protective Society is extending its influence very rapidly in all directions from Carleton Place, having a good representative membership in many points at a distance.”

Ferguson Falls boasts a fine cement county bridge. The marshy portion of the river just above the Falls has always produced a large crop of muskrats.  They are still plentiful.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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Favourite Recipes from Drummond Central School

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

Gluten Free–

Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Pastry Chef Ben White

“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies

I Want Them to Bite into a Cookie and Think of Me and Smile

At Church on Sunday Morning From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

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A cluster of homes on Emond Street (1910 to 1925) Vanier

At Church on Sunday Morning

I think of my upbringing and going to church
My mind keeps going but I am left in a lurch

Childhood days the shoes shone and were polished
Glanced down today at my minister’s feet his shoes were demolished

NO not physically but they were sandals, oh my
I guess at communion one should not spy

My childhood days were brought back to my mind
You only wear sandals when weather is hot and not so kind

Back to reality I come in a hurry
It not the shoe that counts, don’t get in a fleury

In the good book in pictures men wore sandals they did
Do not think that today we should be any different, relax and don’t think GOD forbid

One has to remember you go to church to  kneel and pray
Don’t be judgmental or you might be lead astray.

Communion was good and one does feel relief
Just you go and enjoy, that is the belief.

So never mind the upbringing and what you were taught
It’s one of those things that just matters not

I am sorry to say it must be my age
Forget what I said AND TURN THE PAGE

From the Pen  of Noreen August 2018

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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Jack’s in Charge-Scary Stories — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Adventures at Dalhousie Lake at the Duncan’s Cottages —- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

I am Afraid of Snakes- From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Hitching a Ride Cross Town — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

My Old Orange Hat –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Out of the Old Photo Album — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers

 

Snow Road Ramblings from Richards Castle — From the Pen Of Noreen Tyers

Summer Holidays at Snow Road Cleaning Fish — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Snow Road Adventures- Hikes in the Old Cave — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Putting Brian on the Bus– Stories from my Childhood Noreen Tyers

My Childhood Memory of Richard’s Castle –From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Grandpa’s Dandelion Wine — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

My Wedding Tiara — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Art of Learning How to Butter Your Toast the Right Way — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Smocked Dresses–From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Kitchen Stool — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Flying Teeth in Church — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

The Writings of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Memories of Grandpa’s Workshop — Noreen Tyers

Cleaning out Grandmas’ Fridge — Noreen Tyers Summer Vacation at Richard’s Castle

My Flower Seeds — From the Pen of Noreen Tyers of Perth

Who Invented the Highway Traffic Lights? Evan J. McIlraith Hopetown

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Who Invented the Highway Traffic Lights? Evan J. McIlraith Hopetown

 

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The great American idea is “I am going to do what I want and the hell with the other fellow.” Any skilled engineer can prepare the [traffic control] plan … but building the groundwork is a mansized job.

Evan J. McIlraith, 1946

The Surface Lines Engineering Department was reorganized by Evan J. McIlraith, a mechanical engineer with long mass transit experience in Seattle and Philadelphia. McIlraith and the engineers working with him were given a free hand to explore all matters relating to the company’s operations. Since street traffic constituted a very major part of the difficulty confronting the CSL’s operation, the engineers concentrated much attention on the chaos in the Loop and elsewhere. They lobbied for and provided statistical evidence in support of improved traffic regulation and approached the problem of signal light timing from their own perspective

 

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November 2, 1894 – One of the old landmarks is gone from the township of Darling in the
person of James McIlraith who died at midnight on Saturday, 20th October after little more than a day’s illness caused by injuries from falling while he was running after a sheep in his orchard. The injuries sustained were of such a nature that little could be done beyond allaying the pain and he gradually sank until he died just 36 hours from the time of the accident.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

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And That’s the Way it Was….

The Inventor’s of Carleton Place –Robert Metcalf