Clippings of the Old Albion Hotel

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Clippings of  the Old Albion Hotel
Lost Ottawa
July 5, 2020  · 
No Sunday Driving after you’ve visited this Ottawa watering hole for a pint or three — it’s the Albion Hotel in May of 1957.
First opened in 1871 (although there was apparently previous hostelry on the site dating back to 1844). Now known as the Albion Rooms and part of the Novotel at Daly and Nicholas.
Plus a new looking Chevy passing by … new for then, anyway.
(City of Ottawa Archives CA046463)

It didn’t seem ironic to regulars having a final round at the Albion Motor Hotel that the last day of business at Ottawa’s oldest hotel would fall on Friday the 13th. They know the 140-year-old hotel will still stand as a heritage site in new development slated to start in spring of 1985. But most who came to hoist their glasses in farewell to their favorite watering hole don’t think any bar can live up to to what they consider the “friendliest place in town.” Sure the 50 rooms at the Albion are a little shabby now, and the Rideau Centre across the street makes the modest building pale in comparison. “But where else could you be insulted with such love by your waiter?” said Matt Napier, referring to the hotel’s crusty 72-year-old beerslinger, Ralph Moisan. Napier is now studying in at the University of Windsor, but the former customs officer extended his visit to Ottawa for coffin” of his former Ottawa hang-out. As for Moisan, who worked 30 years at the Belle Claire Hotel on Queen Street before it closed in 1974, most of what he had to say to customers about how he felt about the end of an era at the landmark was unprintable. But there was a trace of a tear in his eye when Moisan finally admitted he looked upon the Albion closing as “losing my second home,” though he insists he can still find employment as a bar waiter “just about anywhere.” Thomas C. Assaly Corp. and Jarvis Freedman, head of Equity Management International Ltd., were given approval by Ottawa Council last week to develop the city block surrounding the hotel. An 18-storey, 243-unit apartment building, 300-room hotel and recreational complex is planned on the site bounded by Daly Avenue, Nicholas, Waller and Besserer streets. The project is expected to cost about $75 million. Ken MacLennan, director of marketing for Assaly, said Friday that close to $5 million will be spent to renovate the Albion, designated a historical site in 1983. “The building will be renovated to the same state as in its heydays during the end of the last century, and will most likely Fred Cattroll. Citizen be turned into a restaurant serving customers at the new hotel,” said MacLennan. At least three sides of the building must remain standing. The fourth wall, facing Nicholas Street, will be torn down since that side of the original building underwent major renovations in the 1950s, when the Albion was owned by former NHL hockey star William Touhey.


CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Apr 1866, Tue  •  Page 1

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1874, Mon  •  Page 2


CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Jun 1877, Tue  •  Page 4

CLIPPED FROM
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jul 1874, Mon  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jul 1984, Fri  •  Page 43

If you look at my hanging fixtures on my porches (6) and the lights in my 2nd floor TV room (6) they all came from the Albion Hotel..

In July of 1984, Cumberland Township councillor Brian Coburn landed a good deal on a slightly used bar. At the same time, Ottawa collector Ian Macdonald was picking up some mirrors and chairs from the 1930s and an area farmer was buying a 40-year-old baler. But what they really bought were chunks of local history as the Albion Hotel, Ottawa’s oldest, bares its body and sells its soul this week. Because the 140-year-old hotel is to be incorporated in a $75-million hotel and residential complex, everything inside cash registers, pillows, switchboard and bar stools is to be sold, beginning today.

At a sale for dealers Wednesday, most of the larger items, such as stoves, bars and kitchen equipment, were bought. Macdonald is opening a 1 930s-st vie restaurant on Clarence Street in September. “I heard about the Albion closing and thought ‘Hey, that place is the 1930s personified’,” he said while walking out with chairs and octagon tables. Coburn, meanwhile, got a bonus with his buys, which included the $1,700 bar. As he and several helpers dismantled it, dozens of old, rusty coins were uncovered about $10 worth, some dating back to the 1920s. Coburn plans to use part of the bar and refrigerating equipment in his Navan restaurant, the Ballycastle, and save the rest for expansion.

The baler was used by hotel staff to crush and package paper and cardboard. The new owner intends to use it to bale wood shavings in his horse barn. Al Cohen, of Cohen and Cohen wreckers, handling the sale, said at least 100 dealers visited the hotel Wednesday. He predicted the hotel, at Nicholas and Daly streets, would be swamped today. For those wanting memorabilia, Albion Hotel blankets are selling for $5, while tavern chairs are going for $25. A sign promoting happy hour has a $2 price tag while another proclaiming the hotel’s ‘Showgirl Revue’ will cost $49. Black and white televisions are selling for $25, while glasses are 50 cents and red lounge chairs are $19. While some shoppers had history in mind, others were there strictly on business. Steve Valois, general manager of Capital Food Equipment, was eyeing a gas stove that had a $1,500 price tag.

He said the company, which specializes in used restaurant equipment, could turn the stove into a new-looking appliance by cleaning and sandblasting it. Thomas C. Assaly Corp. and Jarvis Freed-man, co-owners of the hotel, plan to build an 18-storey, 243-unit apartment building, 300-room hotel and recreational complex. The Albion was designated a heritage site in 1983 and $5-million is to be spent renovating the hotel. Construction is to start next spring, 1985.

Lost Ottawa
August 23, 2013  · 

Friday night’s alright … for the Albion Hotel at 1 Daly Street, shown here in 1875, shortly after it opened. The Court House and Jail across the street provided a steady stream of customers.

I never drank there, but I believe this place became, shall we say, rather notorious in more recent decades. Now it has regained respectability by being incorporated as a wing of the Novatel Hotel.

Barry Augerahhh, the big “A”, safest bar in town, ’cause that’s where all the cops and judges from next door drank.

Andrew Bartholomew ChaplinThe Albion was a watering hole for the members of NDHQ’s Directorate of History that was lodged on the fourth floor of the Ogilvy Building in the 1970s.

Lost Ottawa

September 3, 2015  · Raymond Bjornson shares this picture described as the Albion Hotel, a favorite Ottawa watering hole.No source, or date, alas.

Tania LevyThe portion of the Albion incorporated into the hotel, as its restaurant/bar is still there. It used to be Trio and was renamed The Albion Rooms recently. They make an excellent Caesar!

Not Hogwarth’s —- It’s Hoggards of Ottawa! Besserer Street History

The Brunswick Hotel — The “dollar-a-day” Huckell Hotel — (Murphy-Gamble Limited)

From Carleton Place to “the Laff” — The Life and Times of Peter Prosser Salter

British Hotel Pakenham –Mrs. McFarlane

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

A Piece of Almonte History for Sale –A. H. Whitten- Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel — 1990s More history

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

The Almonte Hotel –Need Community Help!

Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

Documenting Some Queen’s Hotel Photos

Documenting Some Queen’s Hotel Photos

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Documenting Some Queen’s Hotel Photos

Photo- Jo-Anne Dowdall

Lynne Johnsonthey don’t look of age!

Jo-Anne Dowdall-BrownLynne Johnson close … does that count

Heather BigrasI recognize that wallpaper anywhere lol

Bryan ReingoldWhere we drank in Toronto at the Hayloft (part of the Ports of Call), a jug of beer was $1.75 That would have been about 1971 or so.

Byron BuddGreat loss to Carleton Place. When the Queen’s and the Mississippi closed there doors. Sure as hell don’t make them like that now 🍺🍻

Llew LloydYou missed a great life learning experience if you never waited tables in the Queen’s Hotel men’s room

John EdwardsI was never allowed into either hotel.

Deedee SonnenburgMy uncle was a bartender there in the early 80’s, I remember as a kid sitting at the bar with a mini bottle of coke, I felt so grown up

Jack DenovanI played gigs in both.The “Miss” was an adventure for sure.

Philip LeeWhen I was 16 I had a summer job in Almont and was going through a period of reconciled difference of opinion with my parents, I roomed at the hotel.

Holley Gardinerwow Phillip That must havebeen an experience

Philip LeeHolley Gardiner Young and foolish😁

Jodi Bayley HanesJo-Anne Dowdall-Brown haha. Wish we had more pics of those days !

Jo-Anne Dowdall-BrownJodi Bayley Hanes and that is not me in the back …. because I would not have been of age!

Wendy Tilley John CorneilThe Queen’s Rules! Many interesting experiences started there..

Harry PageAs long as your cash was of age everything was good!

Greg WrightThose pitchers were always delicous…lol

Toby RandellThat’s my brother Craig Randell back row right

David RobertsonToby Randell are you sure that is your brother _ I think it is Marc Dumais … I don’t remember him in attendance but I could be wrong — yes the pic reminds me of your brother but I don’t think it is him

Toby RandellDavid Robertson confirmed by 3 family members and Craig himself

David RobertsonThe ones leading me a stray in the picture are : top Row Jo-Anne Dowdall, Marc Dumais Middle row: Heather McDermid ,Penny Gear, Elizabeth Hailstone ,myself David Robertson Bottom Row: David Jeschor and Shawn Oakey .. I think this was around Grade 12 graduation as I remember us singing ” We Don’t Need No Education” Pink Floyd and talking about the end of school .. can anyone one in the picture confirm

Holley GardinerDavid Robertson I think that might be Sandra Ford beside Heather McDiarimd

David Robertsonmmm – it looks like Penny to me but it could be Sandra .. maybe Jo-Anne Dowdall-Brown remembers who is beside Heather .. Is it Sandra or Penny .. I seem to remember Penny in attendance but I don’t remember what I had for lunch yesterday let alone 42 or 43 years ago LOL

Jo-Anne Dowdall-BrownDavid Robertson definitely Sandra

David RobertsonJo-Anne Dowdall-Brown – so only one wrong – i guess i pass the memory test almost — was this pic taken around the end of grade 12 ??

Jo-Anne Dowdall-BrownDavid Robertson it was grade 13 I thought.

Stephen GilesSaturday night at the Queens…great live bands…great memories Lynne Johnson

The Queens Hotel. Golden Nugget lounge. 1970s
Pam McCauley That’s my mommy– Delphine!! she was Miss Smiths Falls one year – good memory
Gail Laycock — obituary

https://millstonenews.com/gail-laycock-obituary/

Gail Laycock
February 10, 1940 – August 9, 2020

Our family is heartbroken to announce the sudden passing of Gail Rose Elaine Laycock, 80, of Carleton Place on August 9, 2020 surrounded by her family. She was married to her soul mate, best friend and loving husband Geoff where they lived in Carleton Place after relocating from Grimsby, Ontario when they purchased the legendary “Queens Hotel” in 1969.

Gail leaves behind her two children who were proud to call her mom: Pat (John) and Sue (Kevin). She was adored by her 5 grandchildren; Shyla, Tyler (Tash), Kelsey (Cory), Meaghan and Derek who will truly miss their “Grams, Grammy”. “GG Ma” became her name after being blessed with 6 great-grandchildren; Eva, Emerson, Georgia, Taylor, Kaycee and Brynn who she bragged about to many family and friends.

She was born to the late Dorothy and George Tyler and predeceased by her brothers Ron and Jim. Gail graduated from Dundas High School in 1958 and from the Hamilton Hospital School of Nursing in the Class of 61 where she leaves behind her nursing friends of 65 years. “May you always walk in Sunshine”. Gail loved to love people and had many loving family and friends who will feel this loss terribly. Geoff and Gail were fortunate to travel the world together where Gail will spend her eternity at seas at a later date.



“The Cards are being dealt in Heaven”







Dolores Murgatroyd-Williams
September 24, 2017  · 
Dolores Murgatroyd-Williams
September 24, 2017  · 

Ray Paquette

Saturday afternoons spent in the Men’s Beverage Room playing shuffleboard and trying, without success, to beat the late Ted Lemaistre Jr. Great memories…

Related reading

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

Mr. Salter from the Queens had an Accident 1932

Looking Through The Windows at The Queens in Carleton Place

  1. Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel
  2. The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place
  3. “You Fight Your Own Battles- I will Fight Mine”– Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel

The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

Part 9-What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

part 10-John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

part 11-The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

part 12 –He Did What? Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

Hotels of Early Carleton Place

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Hotels of Early Carleton Place
A closer look at the Queen’s Hotel and the King’s Cafe.. In front of the Queen’s Hotel with the King’s Cafe- Photo- Tom Edwards 1920s

In the mid 1860’s you probably would grab a drink in Carleton Place:

The Beckwith House owned by William Faust

The British Hotel- William Kelly

The Carleton

The Metcalfe

Willima Moore’s Hotel

Then there was the Carleton, which was built by the Bells as a hotel in the 1830s, then bought and reopened as The Carleton by Napoleon Lavalee in 1846. Peter Salter renamed it The Leland Hotel in 1900 and then it was operated by the Doyles from 1904 on until converted in 1955.

Also well known was The British Hotel which was owned by William Kelly and then became Vic Bennett’s Garage which was at the corner of Bridge and High Street. There was also the Ottawa Hotel, the Ontario Hotel and Lee’s Hotel which was the South East corner of Moore Street railway crossing. Absolam also had a small tavern on the north side of Bell Street from 1863-1870. There were six livery stables which furnished horses and all kinds of first-class rigs for business or pleasure.

In 1904 Carleton Place’s eight hotels were:

James Lee’s The Leland

Walter McIlquham’s The Mississippi Hotel

Albert Salter’s Queens Hotel

The Revere House- formerly The British Hotel

J. E. Rathwell’s Royal Hotel, formerly the Wilson House

D. B. Snedden’s

P. J. O’Briens

Victoria House

P. Salter’s Queen’s Royal at Lake Park

With files from Howard Morton Brown

This is a photograph of Bell Street heading towards Bridge Street c.1870. The photograph features some of our first hotels in Carleton Place! On Bridge Street facing the camera is the “Waterloo Hotel”, which was built in the late 1830s for innkeepers Robert and James Bell. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo
Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum photo The Queen’s Royal Hotel

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
18 Nov 1886, Thu  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 Aug 1899, Sat  •  Page 10
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Aug 1899, Tue  •  Page 2
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Nov 1900, Wed  •  Page 6
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
05 May 1898, Thu  •  Page 7
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jul 1900, Sat  •  Page 8
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
08 Sep 1899, Fri  •  Page 3
Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel
From the picture it looked like quite a grand hotel, but sadly it closed and remained vacant for years. The Drader family moved to Carleton Place around 1932 where Simeon worked as a carpenter. In 1953 he purchased the old Rathwell hotel which by then was in  very bad way and falling apart.
Drader renovated the building and constructed nine apartments in the building that was known as the Drader Block. In 1954 Simeon and Mary Drader celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. The Rathwell Hotel was demolished in 1956 and Simeon Draper also died in 1956.

Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

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Community Memories of the Almonte Hotel

 

Susan Elliott Topping My Grandfather worked there in the evenings after his job at the Gazette office.

Judy Reid Hamre Our high school “Philosophy Club” ran afternoon meetings out of there in our graduating years. The philosophy?
“Can’t dance, might as well drink beer”
Or something like that.

Patti Larose The woodshed lounge. Lol. …where ladies needed an escort and could only sit on one side of the hotel (bar)–the staff. ,Alli,Niper,and Lizard and Marty

Linda Nilson-Rogers At one time there was a sign saying ladies and escorts over the door. Mixed drinks could be had there. The poolroom area was licensed only for beer.

Dawn Jones Linda Nilson-Rogers if I remember correctly we were all there one night with Keith, Donnie and Cindy and Randy(my husband) and myself. I think I was only ever in there less than a handful of times. I did have the occasion of calling the hotel though..searching for an uncle or two who was late home.

Allan StanleyAsk Marg McNeely for a story

Margaret McNeelyWell here’s my story…..worked there as a waitress in the dining room when i was 15…ppl that ate there were usually only overnighters and passing thru. I remember an American family of five left me a $5 tip…boy thought I had struck gold!

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Karen Hirst Story goes that first night in town for Kerry family, year 1954, we had our supper in the dining lounge of the Almonte Hotel.

Rosalyn Wing At one time Mr. Whitten owned it and One side was men only.

 

Stuart McIntosh Same as Notty Lee’s in Smiths Falls

 

Don Raycroft Magically, the beer was always the optimal temperature for drinking !!

 

Don Raycroft No matter how long it was between visits Ali always knew what you drank !!

 

Don Raycroft Mary Edmonds ran the kitchen at one point. Her food was homemade and really good. Best hot hamburgers anywhere

 

Carol McDonald Don Raycroft Mary did make great meals for sure!

 

Darlene MacDonald Don Raycroft Carolyn Elliott also worked in the kitchen. Food was home made and delicious

 

Mary Anne Harrison One night we left The Almonte and headed for CP to The Queens. A cousin of mine, who shall remain nameless, pumped about 20 bucks into the jukebox before we left. Moon River would have serenaded the customers the rest of that night and most of the next day before the money ran out. We laughed ourselves silly over that.

 

Paul Latour LOL … too funny!!. … 😀

 

Susan Elliott Topping Only hotel I ever got kicked out of-(underage) LOL.

 

Don Raycroft Susan Elliott Topping I guess we are now wondering how many you got kicked out of once you became of age !!😊

 

Susan Elliott Topping Don Raycroft None! Now I don’t even drink. Lol

 

Steven Currie If Ali saw u pulling up outside, he would have a cold pint waiting for u before u got through the door, great fellow

 

Don Raycroft Steven Currie There is nothing that says “home” more than that.

 

Linda Mills TANG & Chuckwagons 🤢

 

Sandra Houston- Linda Mills chuck wagons were the best….

 

D Christopher Vaughan Sandra Houston Scott Davey and I each bought a case of chuckwagons from the guy who stocked the freezer one Friday afternoon.

 

Don Raycroft Linda Mills the chuckwagons were probably the most unhealthiest thing on the planet. But they were sooo good. I must try and recreate them for my grandsons. I’ll just tell my daughters it’s a history lesson !! 😊

 

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photo-Lisa Stanley Sheehan–My two lovely aunts, Anita and Mary Murray, in front of the Almonte Hotel

 

June 16 1960–Almonte Hotel

It was announced on Thursday of last week that Mr. Fred Hayward, one of the partners at Hotel Almonte had sold his interest in the business to Mr. F. J. Nagle of Toronto, his associate since the property was sold by Mr. A. H. Whitten in 1955. It was a case where both partners felt that one man ownership would be more efficient. After negotiations over a period of time during which both offered to buy the other out, Mr. Hayward agreed to take Mr. Nagle’s bid and after July 1st he will be the sole owner of the hotel.

 

He is a native of Toronto and has been a partner since 1955. For 25 years he was in the service of O’Keefe’s Brewing Co. Ltd. For a long time he was one of the sales representatives of that concern travelling in Western Ontario and other parts of the province. “Fred” as he is known to his close friends is a family man, his wife and seven children residing in Toronto. During his time as a partner in the local business the interior of the hotel was greatly improved, the men’s beverage room was brought up to date with new flooring, soundproof ceiling and many other new appointments that were long overdue. Mr. Hayward has a nice personality and made many friends during his five years as a citizen of the town. His partner, Mr. Nagle, who has come here periodically over the last five years has an upholstering plant in Toronto. It is probable that he will appoint a manager to operate the business here as he cannot be absent from.

 

Susan Elliott Topping You can buy them at Giant Tiger! (In SF’s anyway)

 

Steven Currie They are in a cage with Round Up in Canadian Tire

 

Allison Vaughan used to walk from school there on Fridays for French fries

 

Tracy Giles-Thompson –Allison Vaughan Best homemade fries and gravy!

 

Christine Mitchell So, I remember when I was very young, maybe 9 or 10, my dad was staying in a room upstairs temporarily. This would have been mid eighties. He came and went out the back fire escape. Somehow, the bolts holding the fire escape to the building came loose, and the stairs fell when my dad was on them. He jumped hoping to get less hurt, ended up breaking his foot very badly. Was in the hospital for a while, in a cast for an even longer while. He walked with a limp after that until he passed. Ali Dixon would know about this.

 

Sandra Houston— Christine Mitchell I remember that…friggin scary

Brenda Voyce Christine Mitchell I remember that.. the old fire escape ladder I bet had not been checked for years.

Christine Mitchell There were many Friday and Saturday nights myself or my brother would call there looking for dad to see when to get supper started, or to ask him for money. Lol. Then we’d show up, stick our heads around the doorway and wait for someone to call Mitch so we could get our $10 or whatever it was we asked for. It always seemed that everyone there knew everyone and it was always a big party.

 

Shelagh Kelly-LaFloor Is the building still around and where is it?

Linda Nilson-Rogers Shelagh Kelly-LaFloor it is now the home of Rebound..reunited across from Circle K

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Sara Alexandra– My dad’s old jacket is from the Almonte Hotel

 

 

historicalnotes

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
20 Jun 1951, Wed  •  Page 14

 

 - The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
06 Jul 1965, Tue  •  Page 8

Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

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Food Review of the Smorgasbord at The Queen’s Royal Hotel 1947

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If I get one good summer day in a summer, and I am out driving around on that summer day, I am content. I therefore declare the summer of 1947 to be a success. Such a day occurred on Civic Holiday. When I whipped in my Fireball motor over the highway  Monday night, I was singing along with Carrie Jacobs Bond: “When You Come to the End of a Perfect Day.” Do you want to know my recipe for a perfect day? Well, this one had everything in it from sunshine to smorgasbord.

Austin F Cross August 6, 1947- page 17

When I had started to high tail it through from Smiths Falls to Carleton Place I remembered Sven Larsen and his invitation to try a smorgasbord at the Queen’s Royal, Carleton Place.

Now those of you who know this Scandinavian ritual will realize that it sounds as improbable that you would get a smorgasbord in Carleton Place as you “would get bouillabaisse Marseillaise at Ka-zabazua”. But I wheeled into the Queen’s Royal, and ordered up a smorgasbord.

In case there are people unfamiliar with this kind of meal, I should explain that it is sort of hors d oeuvres on a Gargantuan scale, and that it is a full meal in itself. We had salami, and smoked salmon, fresh tomatoes, and pickled herring. Many people do not know that the “smoked fish” they eat is eel! It is caught in the Richelieu river, brought to Ottawa for smoking, and relayed to Carleton Place.

You may have heard of tropical ants that over-run an elephant who is lying down, and who five minutes later leave only a skeleton. Well, the ants are sluggards compared to our family, for we left nothing. The smorgasbord a la Larsen was a great success. This with ice cream garnished with fresh (yam yum) peaches, and I was willing to call it a day.

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
15 Aug 1899, Tue  •  Page 2

It was only then that I had time to look at the hotel. It was originally operated by Peter Salter, who used to operate the Bodega in Ottawa, and whose son Hubert, was a great favorite with the Ottawa (Lisgar) Collegiate boys, as well as being an all-round athlete. In any event, the hotel stood idle for a long time, till the Larsens got hold of it. It faces Mississippi Lake, a sportsman’s paradise if you like ducks, fish, or boating.

In front of the hotel is wild rice, specially sown to attract ducks. Wild rice with ducks or geese about Thanksgiving is a great delicacy. I do not know if you can buy wild rice here, but a couple of places in Montreal sell it. Anyway, the ducks get for nothing what we pay more than a dollar a pound for. The hotel, with the croquet, its badminton, and its loafing chairs give you a great chance to do little or nothing in a delightful way.

 Did you Know?

Furthermore, there were restrictive covenants on properties preventing them from being sold to Jews. As well, many clubs, resorts and beaches were barred to Jews. Signs warning “No Jews” or “Christians Only!” could be found on Halifax golf courses, outside hotels in the Laurentians and throughout the cottage areas of Ontario, the lake country of Manitoba and the vacation lands of BC.

Although I have no “personal knowledge” of such signs, I have been told from a few people that locally they remember seeing them at Lake Park Lodge

 - The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
29 Jan 1955, Sat  •  Page 35

relatedreading.jpg

Ottawa Valley Canoe Association– (Carleton Place Canoe Club) and Lake Park Gala August 16 1893

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

Family Photos– Mississippi Lake– Darlene Page

Tales from Lake Park– A Disabled Motor and Manslaughter

Mr. Salter from the Queens had an Accident 1932

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Mr. Salter from the Queens had an Accident 1932

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Files—Thanks to the kindness of Cathie Hawkins McOrmond

Mr. Salter owned the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place and during the decades, he and Mrs. Chatterton swapped ownership back and forth through the years. Who knew what was going on between the two of them? On the 31st of March in 1932 Mr. Salter was very lucky he did not lose his life that day when he drove Mr. Hambly of Ottawa who was a guest of the hotel to Lake Park on Mississippi Lake.

The horse was going at a great clip as he turned  in to stop at the front door. But the horse had other ideas and turned in sharp and the cutter struck a stone and the occupants were thrown out. Mr. Salter’s head struck the hard road and he was knocked out cold. There was a large gash on his head from back to front and the blood flowed from the gash.

Friends flocked around and he was carried into the Queen’s Hotel and Dr. Sinclair was summoned and Salter’s wounds were dressed and word was he suffered great pain.

 

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Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. relatedreading

 

Buggies Horses and Accidents

Tippins — Perth– Just Wanted to Keep His Horse Warm?

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

You’ve Got Trouble in Franktown-Dead Horses and Wives

A Horse is a Horse of Course– Of Course—Angus McFarlane

The Life of a Messenger Boy Before the Internet

Findlay vs. Bailey in Carleton Place —Horses vs. Cars

The Horseshoe Sinkhole Bridge? Mysteries of Lanark County

Name These Lanark County Horseshoe Honeys!

Wild Horses Could Not Drag Me Away

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Names of Leading Hotels 1887

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Names of Leading Hotels 1887

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Baldachin Inn 

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Clipped from

  1. The Gazette,
  2. 09 Apr 1887, Sat,
  3. Page 6

    relatedreading

  4. Cool Burgess — Minstrel Shows at Reilly’s Hotel

  5. What is Heritage? — The Old Hotel in Almonte

  6. Meeting Your Neighbours — Paul Latour and The Almonte Hotel

  7. The Storm of 1952 –McKeen’s Hotel Window’s Smashed- Dogs Cats and Fowl Die in Barrage

  8. Ompah! Ompah! The Trout Lake Hotel

  9. Queen’s Royal Hotel 1899 Guest List- Names Names Names

    Sam of the Russell Hotel in Smiths Falls

    Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

    The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

  10. “You Fight Your Own Battles- I will Fight Mine”– Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel

  11. Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

    Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

    The Leland and Rathwell Hotels on Bridge Street

    Leo Doyle of the Leland Hotel in Carleton Place –Calling All Doyles

  12. McCann’s Hotel Fire in Perth

  13. I Can Dream About You —Early Hotels of Perth

  14. The “Tramp” from Ottawa to Perth 1877 Come Walk With Them

  15. Part 1- Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place- can be found here.Part 2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

    Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

    Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

    Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

    Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

    Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

    Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

    Part 9-What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

    part 10-John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

    part 11-The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

    part 12 –He Did What? Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

    The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

    Things That Disappear in Carleton Place — Elgin Street and The Queen’s Hotel Sign

    The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

     

  16. Romancing the Mississippi Hotel

  17. Murders and Mysteries of the Mississippi Hotel

    Thieves at the Mississippi Hotel–When Crime Began to Soar

    All About Lorraine Lemay –Mississippi Hotel

    The Old Side Door of the Mississippi Hotel

    Architecture Stories: The Hotel that Stompin’ Tom Connors Saved

    The Napoleon of Carleton Place

    Grandma’s Butterscotch Pie

    Mississippi Hotel Beer — Brading’s Beer

    In the Mississippi Hotel Mood with Mrs. Glen Miller

    The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

    Burnin’ Old Memories –The Mississippi Hotel Fire

    Romancing the Mississippi Hotel in 1961

    Where Was Linda? A Necromancer Photo Blog -Victorian Seance at the Mississippi Hotel

    Spooky Night at the Seccaspina Hotel

Ompah! Ompah! The Trout Lake Hotel

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Ompah! Ompah! The Trout Lake Hotel

 

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1953-09-01-001 Trout Lake Hotel.jpg

From–Clarendon and Miller Community Archives

The hotel was built in the late 1800’s by a Card for Henry Dunham. It was operated for a time by Mrs. Briscoe, a daughter of Henry Dunham, who then sold it to Jim Johnson from Palmer Rapids. The next owner was Jim Watson, father of Mrs. Carrie Dunham, followed by Robert Eadie who operated it for 9 years. Wm. McCullough owned it for a brief period, then Charlie Dunham took over and was there for 33 years. Reg Elkington and Bill Cameron were the next owners but operated for a short time only. They sold to Jim McCurdy and it was while he was operating it that the liquor license was obtained and the area for the bar was added to the front of the building. Upon McCurdy’s death his widow Grace remarried Gilbert Dunham and they operated it until they sold the hotel to Don Dunne. He operated for a few years and then sold to Wayne and Val Kearney.–From–Clarendon and Miller Community Archives

 

 

 

 

relatedreading

 

Stomping in Ompah! by Arlene Stafford Wilson

Queen’s Royal Hotel 1899 Guest List- Names Names Names

Sam of the Russell Hotel in Smiths Falls

Did You Know we Once Had a Grand Hotel? The Grand Central Hotel

The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

 

trout lake hotel ompah | arlene stafford wilson

Queen’s Royal Hotel 1899 Guest List- Names Names Names

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Queen’s Royal Hotel 1899 Guest List- Names Names Names

 

This is a picture of the Queens Royal Hotel, built by Peter Prosser Salter in 1899 and was part of the Lake Park Resort just outside of Carleton Place. The old 1887 Lodge was once the Queen’s Royal Hotel, an illustrious and notorious gathering place.

 

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Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  11 Aug 1899, Fri,  Page 8

 

Lake Park Lodge – Queen’s Royal Hotel- Mississippi Lake Carleton Place Ontario

 

The Cottages of Mississippi Lake — Carleton Place Ontario

Miracle at Mississippi Lake-John Brown Jr.

Tales of the Mississippi Lake- Believe it or Not!

Tales of the Mississippi Lake- Believe it or Not!

CPHS Students Declare War on Mississippi Lake – 1973

Lake Park has been empty for a few years now

“You Fight Your Own Battles- I will Fight Mine”– Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel

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“You Fight Your Own Battles- I will Fight Mine”– Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel

 

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Saturday afternoon I scoured newspaper archives while watching Christmas movies on the W channel reading all about the fight between Dan Miller who owned the Queen’s Hotel and the town of Carleton Place.  I had written briefly about it before-(Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel vs the Town of Carleton Place), but had no idea that it went back and forth the way it did until I saw it in print.

It was basically a story about a stubborn man who thought he was right, and just felt more tax money would equal higher prices and less business. Being a former business owner I get it, but it just reminded me that things don’t change no matter what year it is.

There was no doubt in my mind that both sides attempted to draw in their fair share of the townsfolk’s opinions into their squabble and a vicious “he said, she said” ensued. Instead of working together they fought viciously against each other, and really who won? These back and forth newspaper clippings are worth reading, if not to instill in us that we need not to “threaten old widows” nor “board up our buildings” but all just try and get along. Dan Miller died 8 years later  on the 19th of June 1957 in a farm field in Ramsay Township at the age of 74. He is still a person on my list I would have liked to meet as I will always admire people with convictions.

 

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  06 Aug 1949, Sat,  Page 1

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  18 Aug 1949, Thu,  Page 4

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  31 Aug 1949, Wed,  Page 1

 

Clipped from The Winnipeg Tribune,  01 Sep 1949, Thu,  Page 8

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Sep 1949, Thu,  Page 4

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  08 Sep 1949, Thu,  Page 1

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  02 Sep 1949, Fri,  Page 3

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  01 Nov 1949, Tue,  Page 14

 

Clipped from The Ottawa Journal,  03 Nov 1949, Thu,  Page 38

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place.

Information where you can buy all Linda Seccaspina’s books-You can also read Linda in The Townships Sun andScreamin’ Mamas (USA)

 

relatedreading

Dan Miller of the Queen’s Hotel vs the Town of Carleton Place

Carleton Place Folk Art from the Queen’s Hotel –The Millers

 

Part 1- Tales of the Chatteron House Corset — Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place- can be found here.

Part 2- Hell on Wheels at Lady Chatterton’s Hotel in Carleton Place– can be found here.

Part 3- I Will Take Some Opium to Go Please —The “Drug Dispensary” at the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 4- Chatterton House Hotel Registrar- George Hurdis -1884

Part 5-What the Heck was Electric Soap? Chatterton House Hotel Registrar

Part 6-The First Mosh Pits in Carleton Place — The Opera House of the Chatterton House Hotel

Part 7-All the President’s Men — Backroom Dealings in Carleton Place?

Part 8- Who Was John Boland? Chatterton House/Queen’s Hotel Registry — The Burgess Family Dynasty

Part 9-What Happens Behind The Queen’s Hotel Stays Behind the Queen’s Hotel

part 10-John Sparrow’s Royal Parilion – Chatterton House Hotel Carleton Place

part 11-The Rules of the Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

part 12 –He Did What? Tales of the Queen’s Hotel

The Sultans of Swing at The Queen’s Hotel in Carleton Place

Things That Disappear in Carleton Place — Elgin Street and The Queen’s Hotel Sign

The Mystery Murals of The Queen’s and Mississippi Hotel

 

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