Dead Mules and Donkey Baseball

Standard
Dead Mules and Donkey Baseball
CLIPPED FROM
Evening Despatch
Birmingham, West Midlands, England
11 Oct 1911, Wed  •  Page 3

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
27 Apr 1916, Thu  •  Page 6

CLIPPED FROM
The Kingston Whig-Standard
Kingston, Ontario, Canada
27 Apr 1916, Thu  •  Page 6

CLIPPED FROM
Altoona Times
Altoona, Pennsylvania
08 Sep 1916, Fri  •  Page 10

CLIPPED FROM
The Baltimore Sun
Baltimore, Maryland
24 Jun 1966, Fri  •  Page 13

Donkey baseball was a ball game played on donkeys. Real live donkeys. Thus the term—Donkey baseball. It was an erroneous term, actually, as it was, literally, donkey softball. A regulation softball was used, regulation bats, regulation gloves, everything. With that one slight revision seven donkeys were in the field and the fielders had to ride them. (For some reason no short fielder was used then in this form of softball. Maybe they only had seven donkeys.)

That was back when you could before they changed the rules on pitchers whip your arm around as many times as you wished before releasing the ball. Anyhow, donkey baseball was greeted with great enthusiasm! Actually, the “visiting team” was in the employ of the promoter. The guy who owned the donkeys. They wore jerseys with the name of any town likely to be hated when it came up against the local teams. Everybody in the field, except the pitcher and catcher, sat more or less alertly at least in the opening innings — aboard their respective asses. The hitter stood on the ground to bat, but when he hit the ball he had to jump up on his donkey and start urging it to-It ward first base. You can imagine how that went!!!

CLIPPED FROM
The Baltimore Sun
Baltimore, Maryland
24 Jun 1966, Fri  •  Page 13
Thanks to Sandy FranceHere’s a pic from the early 50’s of a parade before the donkey baseball. Jim Brown of Strathburn Dairy is holding the donkey and Thorpe Kelly of Peterson’s Ice Cream is riding the donkey. The event was sponsored by the Almonte Lions Club.–

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Jul 1936, Fri  •  Page 17


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Jul 1936, Tue  •  Page 15

House Of David

Ray Paquette— During the 1950s, the ball park was the site of games featuring teams of “barnstorming” American professional baseball players who played local teams. The purpose was to raise money in support of local baseball. One such team, “The House of David” featured two things: all the players sported full beards and the game was played at night under lights atop of standards that were brought to town by the visitors. For baseball fans, playing under the lights was an added draw. It’s hard to believe that night baseball was played in Carleton Place before it was played at Wrigley Field, home of the Chicago Cubs! It was quite an experience for young boys at the time–Baseball in Carleton Place —- Pollock Cup Winners and The House of David

Baseball in Carleton Place —- Pollock Cup Winners and The House of David

The Symphony of the Louisville Slugger and Sam Bat

The Glory Days of “Lefty” Hill of Carleton Place

It’s The McNeely’s Baseball Team!

Armchair Tourism in Carleton Place- What are Baseball Bats Used for in Movies?

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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