In Memory of Silver Cross Mothers — thanks to Stuart McIntosh

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Silver Cross mothers would have received a letter like this which includes his veterans pay during WW2. Remembrance Day was not the only painful day. — Stuart McIntosh

Jim– Stuart McIntosh

National Silver Cross Mother

The Memorial Cross (more often referred to as the Silver Cross) was first authorized on December 1, 1919 as a memento of personal loss and sacrifice on the part of widows and mothers of Canadian sailors, aviators and soldiers who died for their country during the war.

Today, the National Silver Cross Mother is chosen by the Legion among nominations made by Legion Provincial Commands and individuals to represent the mothers of Canada at the National Remembrance Day Ceremony in Ottawa. During her tenure, which starts on November 1, the National Silver Cross Mother fulfills other official functions. Each of the Silver Cross Mothers was first a mother. They are connected through their children who served and died in military service. Read their biographies to find out about them. CLICK HERE

Linda Seccaspina
November 11, 2017  · 




Debbie McVie posted this…So proud of you Mom (Joan Bray) being chosen as the Silver Cross Mother representative once again. Another opportunity to thank you and Dad for your years of service. Love you.
#LestWeForget-One of my favourite people in the world is Joan Bray said Linda Seccaspina–
For this year’s Silver Cross Mother, Susan M. Storie, she said she was honoured to have been asked to place the wreath. Her husband and veteran, Mark Beninger, died three years ago, Nov. 13 “right at this hospital,” she said, eyes filling with tears. “It is very emotional today.”

Beninger was in the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery and served in Germany, Bosnia, Sinai, Lebanon, and Golan Heights. He was awarded the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal (CPSM) and the NATO Medal for Service with NATO on Operations in Relation to the Former Yugoslavia. Beninger was acknowledged by the Government of Canada for 35 years of service. The Memorial Cross (more often referred to as the Silver Cross) was first authorized Dec. 1, 1919, as a memento of personal loss and sacrifice on the part of widows and mothers of Canadian sailors, aviators and soldiers who died for their country during the war.CLICK here for morehttps://www.thestar.com/local-perth/news/2021/11/11/with-video-crowd-fills-drummond-street-hospital-grounds-for-remembrance-day-in-perth.html?itm_source=parsely-api
CLIPPED FROM
The Lanark Era
Lanark, Ontario, Canada
07 May 1919, Wed  •  Page 1
Blast from the Past no date The Silver Cross Mothers from Legion Zone G-6 were given a banquet in their honour on Friday, April 26th, in the Lanark United Church hall. Branch 395 Legion, Lanark, hosted the event with over one Hundred in attendance. There were twenty-four Silver Cross Mothers honoured, three from Almonte seen here with Past President Alf MacPherson. They are Mrs. Badour, Mrs. Stanley and Mrs. Houston.

Miss Tena Stewart War Heroine — Almonte Appleton and Carleton Place

Women of the Red Cross — Mary Slade –Larry Clark

Heh Miss Wilsonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn! Carleton Place Heroe

Did You Ever Notice This in Beckwith Park? Thanks to Gary Box

90 Day Fiance and Mail Order and War Brides

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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