Central Canadian Fire January 1923

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Central Canadian Fire January 1923
1898 Toronto Star corner Emily and Bridge

present day

Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum..photo

In 1861, the McLean’s owned the building. In 1877, William McDiarmid gained
ownership of the premises after Struthers owned it. William McDiarmid took over
William Neelin’s general store in 1870 – the Golden Lion Store on the North West
corner of Bridge and Emily Street. By 1882, the store had gas lighting.

At 120 Bridge Street between 1882 and 1905 Duncan and William McDiarmid operated a store together. Later Mr. Pollock operated a music store at this location. The Central Canadian’s Office was located at 120 until the 1923 fire prior to merging with the Herald.

The Central Canadian’s editor was W.W. Cliff. In 1876, Cliff started the Canadian. Cliff was at the helm of the Central Canadian for thirty five years until F.A.J. Davis took over. In 1927 the name of the Central Canadian was changed to the Carleton Place Canadian.

The photo of the burned out building was taken on January 7, 1923, this photo shows the aftermath of a fire at the Herald/Central Canadian Newspaper office located on the north-west corner of Bridge and Elgin/ Emily Street in Carleton Place. This is now the site of Body Graphics Tattoo.

It was 10 pm when the fire was discovered in the office of the Central Canadian. It took over two hours to get the fire under control-but in no time the roof had fallen in and the floors collapsed in several places.The newspaper plant and stock valued at $13,000 was destroyed, and the building frame veneered with brick was a wreck estimated at $5000 in damages.

The flames had spread upward to the second floor where the heavier type of metal machinery was and it became too dangerous for the firemen to enter, less the floor give way. Mr. F.A. Davis the owner had insurance of $6000 on the plant and the Wm. McDiarmid estate owners of the building $2000, so the loss was a heavy one to both parties. The brick building adjoining the burned building was saved intact –so the Central Canadian moved next door and Mr. Davis determined what arrangements he could make to get the town’s newspaper out the next day. No word if that paper did come out.

After the 1923 fire, the new building housed Leo. McDiarmid’s Sports.  Guns could be purchased or repaired, and ammunition and decoys were sold. Later Cliff Caldwell and his wife Edna operated a hair salon and lived on the second floor. About 1950 George H Doucett bought the building and his insurance company operated there until the early 70s. Mr. William S. Rowat was his office manager and after he lost an eye and could no longer drive, Mr. Doucett’s nephew Allan joined the staff. Mr.and Mrs. Dan Nichols occupied the upstairs apartment and the building was later purchased by Howard McNeely who operated a barbershop at 120 Bridge.

Almonte Gazette January 12 1923

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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