The “Hurricane” of 1950

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The “Hurricane” of 1950
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jul 1950, Tue  •  Page 1

Damage that can be done by a hurricane such as visited this continent last Saturday is unpredictable and terrifying. Almonte got off lightly in comparison with some other places. Here the wind reached its high point about eleven o’clock Saturday night when it ripped many roofs off buildings, felled trees, blew down a barn owned by Mr. Harold Robertson opposite the Rosamond Memorial Hospital, and did a lot of strange and awful things that were most unexpected.

The first property in Almonte to suffer serious damage here on Saturday was the grandstand at the fair grounds. The wind took off part of the roof and back wall turning it back and breaking electric light wires on Water Street. At night the roofing on top of the building occupied by the Bell Telephone Co. took wing and carried with it part of the roof atop the building owned by Mr. P. A. Greig, K.C., the main floor of which houses the Royal Bank.

Other buildings to suffer from torn roofs were those owned by R. J. France, the Hartley Woollen Mills, the Rosamond Woolen Co., the Almonte Garage and the Almonte Flour Mills which suffered loss of a chimney. The Baptist Church also was a victim of the storm when a chimney was blown over. There were many cases of roof damage which are too numerous to mention. Trees uprooted Mr. George L. Comba’s yard and he lost seven trees on his property but none of their downfalls damaged his house.

In the New England section, Mr. Winslow-Spragge of New Burnside had a queer visitation. A tree blew over which had its roots under oil pipes leading from an outside tank to his furnace. When this happened the pipes were broken and he lost about 500 gals, of fuel. It is hard to estimate the -over all damage done but it will run well over $10,000. Many people had wind insurance while some had none. The rain that accompanied and followed the wind storm added to the loss of those people whose roofs were damaged. Temporary repairs have been made in most cases and will be left that way until the warm weather of spring makes it possible to make permanent repairs in the form of new roofs. A strange fact about the whole thing is that the old fashioned shingle roofs seemed to stand up better under the strain than the new kind

Nov 30 1950

CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
18 Jul 1950, Tue  •  Page 1
CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Nov 1950, Mon  •  Page 1

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About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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