Lanark County Medical Advice 1800s – Wear Earrings for a Sore Throat

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Lanark County Medical Advice 1800s – Wear Earrings for a Sore Throat

An old gentleman of Scotch descent, born in Lanark County and living on Manitoulin Island, used the following procedure for the cure of wounds in animals: Three sweet-apple scions of different lengths are procured, and each rubbed three times all over the wound. They are then carried home by the operator of the cure, and subjected to some secret treatment there. It is said that, at any rate, no word- formula is used. At this stage of the treatment the cure can be made to progress either favorably or unfavorably, at will. It is said that the twigs will become pulverized after a while.

An important part of the cure is the diet and treatment of the animal, which must be fed on hot mash, oats, chip, and similar foods. It must be exercised daily and kept moving, especially if the wound is discharging, and must also be kept very clean. The wound must be washed well with warm water before the twigs are applied. The emphasis laid on the treat- ment before and after seems to suggest that the twigs might be dispensed with.

268. The same informant was believed to possess wonderful abilities in the matter of stopping hemorrhages. It was not necessary for him to be present in order to stop these. Some formula or scriptural quotation was employed.

269. The seventh son of the seventh son can stop hemorrhages, as can also the seventh son. (W.)

270. To stop nose-bleed, place a key or a coin on the back of the neck;1 or snuff the smoke from a puff-ball (Lycoperdon).

Also read-Oddities — Lanark County Puffball Mushrooms

271. An old-fashioned first-aid for wounds or bleeding was to apply a bunch of spiderwebs.

272. For bee-stings, apply some clay or mud. The bee is supposed to die after it stings one.

273. For sore eyes, wear earrings. This remedy was formerly frequently used by men.

Also read-Strange Folklore from Ontario –BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD

Two boys had a girl triend who lay dying of consumption. One evening the boys were returning home through the woods near Lanark. Quite suddenly, a little ahead of them, they saw their friend cross their path and disappear among the trees. They called her name, but she did not answer. On reaching home, they rushed into the kitchen, shouting, “Nellie is better! We saw her in the woods.” Great was their surprise to hear that Nellie had died an hour before.

Back in the 19th century, a cutting-edge new “treatment” for rheumatism was introduced on Australia’s southern coast: sitting inside a rotting whale carcass. It was believed that if a person stayed inside of the dead whale for 30 hours, they would be relieved of joint aches for up to 12 months. Clearly, there’s no scientific evidence to support the healing power of sitting inside of a dead whale, but it seems like people were desperate enough to actually try it.
Bloodletting is known as one of the oldest medical practices, dating back 3000 years to ancient Egypt. The procedure was common in medieval Europe to treat diseases such as smallpox, epilepsy, and plague. However, it didn’t end there. Bloodletting was commonly practiced throughout the 19th century, too, and is sometimes even used today. Towards the end of the 19th century, the treatment was discredited when doctors finally admitted that depleting the body’s blood supply can be risky and doesn’t have many valuable health benefits. Bloodletting puts a patient at risk of having a cardiac arrest, losing too much blood, and can cause dangerously low blood pressure, in addition to the possibility of infections and anemia.

Also read-Need “BLOOD-LETTING’? Head on Down to the Blacksmith!

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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