Documenting Mr.and Mrs. William Fest Transportation Building or—I Want Candy

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Documenting Mr.and Mrs. William Fest Transportation Building or—I Want Candy
Located on one of the busiest intersection in Ottawa, the Transportation building almost remained unchanged; only its ground floor was modified and became one of the main entrance to the Rideau Centre. Photo- Ottawa Archives- from PastOttawa
Lost Ottawa
December 19, 2013  · 




Ottawa’s “Transportation Building” at Rideau and Colonel By, seen from the from the southwest. In the bottom, the old Elephant and Castle.

The building opened in 1916 by JR Booth’s son, CJ Booth, and has many federal civil servants over the years — I think the NCC was in there at one time. Still good looking.

The building served as Ottawa’s City Hall between 1931 (when the City Hall on Elgin burned down) and 1958, when the new — now old — city hall was built at Rideau Falls.
Blair StannardOld Ottawa And Bytown Pics
March 1  · 

Ottawa – 1966 – the Transportation Building at Rideau and Sussex. It was the site of the Ottawa city hall, after the former city hall at Elgin and Queen burned in 1931. It served as such until the new city hall building was built on Green Island. (1958)
City of Ottawa Archives CA 000155

Lost Ottawa

August 27, 2016  · Here’s a major Ottawa corner in January of 1910. This is Rideau and Little Sussex, which is now the southeast corner of Rideau and Colonel By. Sinkhole to the left.This building once housed jeweler James Tracy, the drug store of William Roger, and the Dairy Lunch. Kind of a mini Rideau Mall.The corner would be transformed in 1916 with the construction of the Transportation Building (once the home of the NCC, and once also the home of City Hall).(LAC PA-042564)

The Fest Family

In 1887 on the site of the Transportation building southeast corner of Rideau and Little Sussex streets, there stood a 2and one half storey tin-roofed, solid stone building. That old building, a relic from the 1850s, was occupied by Mrs. William Fest. Her shop was the candy and pastry centre of Ottawa in the 1880s.


CLIPPED FROM
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
07 Nov 1931, Sat  •  Page 32

Everybody in the 1870s- 1880s in Ottawa knew the Fests. Fest’s confectionery store, at the southeast corner of Rideau and Little Sussex streets, was known to everybody in Ottawa, It occupied the same position in the public eye that Scott’s confectionery on Sparks street did in the 1860s and 1870s. The Fests came to Ottawa from the county Donegal in the late 1860s and opened a confectionery store in the 2 1-2 storey stone building where the Transportation building now stands.

Mrs William ( Pender) Fest in the early 1880s was an indefatigable worker. The Fests attended St. John’s Anglican church on Sussex street. In church work Mrs. Fest was always just as busy as she was in her store. Mrs. Fest was noted for her equable and calm disposition. She always had a cheery word for her customers and was a good judge of human nature. Whenever a new girl came to the store to serve, Mrs Fest would say, “Now, my dear, eat all the candy you feel like eating, but do not take any home. If I find you taking any home I will have to discharge you. It will not be necessary for you to wait till I am out to eat. You may do it when I am present.”

The result of such talks was that Mrs. Fest’s girls, or parcel boys, used invariably to start in to gorge themselves on candy (mostly when Mrs. Fest was not around). The further result was that they always got sick, their stomachs turned upside down and candy became repulslve to them. Thereafter the Fest candy became as safe from attack as though it had not been there. Mr. Fest was seldom seen by the public. He was always too busy at the back making cakes and candies.

1901 Census

Name:William Fest
Gender:Male
Race:White
Racial or Tribal Origin:English
Nationality:Canadian
Marital status:Married
Age:25
Birth Date:26 Mar 1875
Birth Place:Ontario
Relation to Head of House:Head
Occupation:Confectioner
Hourly Wage:432
Working at Trade in Factory or in Home:F
Months Employed at Trade in Factory:12
Can Read:Yes
Can Write:Yes
Can Speak English:Yes
Province:Ontario
District:Ottawa (City/Cité)
District Number:100
Sub-District:Ottawa (City/Cité) Central (Ward/Quartier)
Sub-District Number:5
Family Number:72
Neighbors:View others on page
Household Members:NameAgeWilliam Fest25Margurite Fest27Margurite Fest5Katherine G Fest2George Fitzgerald29
William Fest
Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1891, Thu  •  Page 4

Transportation Building — It was incorporated into the Rideau Centre and is heritage designated.

Joy Eastop WatsonNCC was definitely in there, My mom worked for the NCC for 26 years & I remember looking out those big 1st floor windows when the Santa parade went by in the 70’s… Those were also the days when you could open the window and smoke in the office.

Andrew DeBeaupréWasn’t it also known as the Dominion Bridge building before WWII? NCC was there in mid-70s

David TwolanI miss the Elephant and Castle. Great pub.

Blair StannardOld Ottawa And Bytown Pics
March 1  · 




Ottawa – 1966 – the Transportation Building at Rideau and Sussex. It was the site of the Ottawa city hall, after the former city hall at Elgin and Queen burned in 1931. It served as such until the new city hall building was built on Green Island. (1958)
City of Ottawa Archives CA 000155

From Ottawa City Directory 1870-1871 Simpson Book Collection

From Ottawa City Directory 1887-1888 Simpson Book Collection

Memories of Mulvey’s Candy Store and Joie Bond — Larry Clark

Documenting Isabel Hogan’s Candy Store

It Started in the Candy Kitchen Restaurant– Kerfoot Fire Smiths Falls

Memories of the Ideal Candy Shop

Coffee Talk– Coolidge’s Penny Candy and Rochester Street– For Tom Edwards

From Chocolate to Lofts- Memories of Patterkrisp Candy?

Pour Some Sugar on Me! The Demise of the Penny Candy

Candy Stores Shoes and Plungers– Ray Paquette

The Candy Man — George Dummert

Margaret Love -From Sweet to Sour

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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