W. J. Hughes — The Rexall Drugstore on the Corner

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W. J. Hughes — The Rexall Drugstore on the Corner
Photo-Adin Wesley Daigle
Mayor of Carleton Place – 1922 – Druggist Photo- – Rootsweb–
Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

127-131 Bridge Street Carleton Place Circa 1870

The first storey storefronts of this building have been modified from the original glass windows for easier viewing of merchandise–hence the different colours of brick. 127-131 Bridge Street has housed a number of different businesses including pharmacies, clothing stores, grocery stores, and poolrooms.

The Hughes family bought the pharmacy from Dr. Preston in 1905.

W. J. Hughes Rexall Drug store was located on the corner and Thomas Lloyd Hughes born in 1897 along with his brother Harold until they each decided to run a smaller store at the opposite  ends of town. Lloy’s store was on Moffatt Street and Harold on Lake Ave West. For 50 years they were in groceries together and then the store was sold to Thomas’s nephew and for 12 years Thomas drove a butcher wagon. There was a dark room at the rear of the store where Mr. Hughes tested your eyes for glasses. You could buy a roll of film #116 for a Brownie Box camera for 25 cents and for $1.25 he would send it away to be developed.

The folks in Carleton Place will always remember the Rexall Drug annual 1 cent sale and every local household stocked up on cough medicine, cough drops, peroxide and all sorts of liniment. Some of the clerks that worked there were: Olive Dick, Ruby Voyce, and John Briscoe and Wilbert Robertson.

Harvey Asselstine attended the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1929. In 1944, he
returned to Carleton Place and bought the drugstore at the corner of Bridge and
Franklin, from W.J. Hughes who operated it for 38 years. Betty Findlay and Mary Cook both worked at Assestine’s Pharmacy.  In the rear of Asselstine’s drug store the CPR Telegraph operated during the 1950s. Asselstine expanded his drug store and bought out Hughes Grocery. In 2006 the Athen’s Corners Restaurant  was located there.

Taber and McCrae operated a Men’s and Boy’s clothing store within Struther’s Block, which later became a pool hall  (next door) operated by Mel Barclay. Charlie Giroux, who only had one arm took over the pool hall then Ab Dowseth from Smiths Falls operated it for a short time but when McCann and Porter gained ownership they moved the pool hall to the old Bank of Commerce.

Jeremy Stinson— That corner was, for much of my childhood, the home of the Blossom Shop. Back before the one way street.

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
09 Aug 1965, Mon  •  Page 31

Photos-Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum ( see the Queens Hotel across the street)

Son of William James Hughes and Mabel Vaughan (nee Strong) Hughes, of Carleton Place, Ontario. Brother of Freda, Morley and Cyril. The Town of Carleton Place remembered Pilot Officer Hughes by naming a street for him.

The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Tue, Sep 02, 1941 · Page 9
The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
28 Apr 1947, Mon  •  Page 3
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
03 Dec 1921, Sat  •  Page 5

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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