Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

Standard
Vintage Easter and Bunny Cake Recipes from the 60s and 70s

1. Easter Bunny Cake recipe (1950)

1953 Easter egg cake recipe

A feather in your Easter bonnet — this luscious Easter bunny cake… Best cake you’ve baked in a month of Easter Sundays… and you… yes, you… can take all the glory!

Ingredients

1/2 cup Dexo (shortening)
2-1/4 cups sifted cake flour
3 teaspoons double-action baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1% cups sugar
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 eggs, unbeaten

Directions

Measure shortening into bowl. Sift dry ingredients onto shortening. Add vanilla to milk. Add 2/3 of the milk.

Blend and beat 1 minute (count at least 150 strokes per minute). Add remaining 1/3 milk. Add eggs. Beat 2 minutes. Bake in two greased and floured deep 8-inch layer pans in moderate oven, 375° F for 25 to 30 minutes.

When cool, frost with butter frosting. Color coconut green, using vegetable coloring. Place on top of cake.

Arrange Easter candy bunny on coconut. Decorate with colored jelly beans.

Vintage Easter bunny cake recipe from 1950

Bake Swan’s Down Yellow Cake Mix in two 8-inch layers, following directions on package. Make Easy Chocolate Frosting, using the recipe on the back of the blue and yellow package of Baker’s Unsweetened Chocolate.

1. Cut each cake layer in two, about 1/4-inch off-center. This will make two large and two smaller pieces.

2. Place these four pieces together with frosting between them, the smaller pieces on the outside. Stand them upright, cut sides down, on a cake plate.

3. Trim the outside pieces at the top outer edges to help round off sides of cake for egg shape.

4. Then trim off lower ends of outside pieces, slicing diagonally, to give cake an oval shape at base.

Cover the whole mound with remaining frosting, filling in to make an egg shape. Decorate with white and tinted frosting and jelly beans. Make a nest of green-tinted Baker’s Coconut around egg. To serve, cut across the egg, making four-layer slices of cake.

When I go to a family reunion, or maybe church homecoming, THIS is the type of Coconut Cake I want to see on the dessert table.  One look, and you can tell it was made by a dear, older Mother or Grandmother, that’s been baking for years.  Sure, she wants it to look good, but she’s more concerned about how it tastes.

There might have been a day, years ago, when she could make her cake look like something in a bakery window.  Now, the years have taken a toll on her body.  Her hands shake a bit these days, as she adjusts layers and spreads the icing.  Her legs just don’t have the strength to stand at her table, and work and fuss with it like she once did. She has to take frequent breaks lately, just to rest awhile, so she can work on it a little bit more.

As a young child, she learned how to make this cake standing beside her own mother.  She’s never used a recipe, but now, her mind continues to wonder if she’s somehow forgotten a key ingredient.

All through the years, she’s heard people talk about how great her cakes are.  She just smiles, often looking downward as if embarrassed, but her heart is made happy as she tenderly says, “Thank You.”

Out the corner of their eye, everybody seems to watch when they realize her cake is being brought in. Some even strain their neck a bit, to see exactly where it gets placed among the others on the long table. You know hers will be the first empty cake plate on that table, and you have already schemed up a plan to get a slice.  Heaven forbid if someone should take the last piece before you get yours.

My mother made a great Coconut Cake, one that was similar to this one. Her icing was more of a clear type and you could clearly see the layers beneath that frosting and the layer of coconut spread on top. In the earlier years, she always used a fresh coconut, grating it by hand. She would always hand me the small leftover pieces that she didn’t grate, and that was like pure candy in my book.

Cake Ingredients: Sungold Coconut Cake

  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 1 cup Butter, at room temperature
  • 4 Eggs, separated
  • 1 cup Evaporated Milk
  • 3 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 3 teaspoons Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • Pinch of Salt

Coconut Cream Icing

  • 3 cups Coconut
  • 3 cups Confectioners’ Sugar
  • 8 Tablespoons Heavy Cream, approximately.
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350ºF.

  1. Place flour, baking powder, and pinch of salt, in a sifter.
  2. Sift three times. Set aside.
  3. Place butter in a large mixing bowl.
  4. Add Sugar.
  5. Beat butter and sugar to a smooth cream consistency.
  6. Separate the egg yolks from the whites, set whites aside.
  7. Beat the egg yolks well.
  8. Add egg yolks to the butter and sugar mixture and beat until very light.
  9. Add the sifted flour, alternating with the milk, to the first mixture, mix to combine.
  10. Beat the egg whites to a stiff froth.
  11. Add the vanilla extract to the batter mixture.
  12. Gently fold in the egg whites to the batter.
  13. Butter and flour two 9 inch cake layer pans.
  14. Divide the batter between the two pans.
  15. Bake at 350ºF for 20-25 minutes, or until done.
  16. Insert a wooden toothpick or skewer in the center of the baked layer. If it pulls out clean, cake is done.
  17. Remove from oven, place on a wire rack, let cool for 10 minutes before removing from pan.
  18. Let layers cool completely.
  19. Prepare layers as desired before frosting.

To Make The Icing and Assemble The Cake

  1. Place sugar in a medium size mixing bowl.
  2. Add the cream, a little at a time, beating steadily.
  3. Add Vanilla.
  4. When icing is of the right consistency, spread over the top of the layer.
  5. Sprinkle a good layer of coconut on top of layer.
  6. Repeat with the next layer.
  7. Ice the final layer and sides of the cake.
  8. Cover the entire cake with remaining coconut.
  9. Serve and Enjoy!

ow to make an Easter Bunny cake:

This is a cake that my mom used to make for us on Easter Saturday from a pattern she found in a magazine back in the early 70’s. It’s simple and clever: one round cake serves as the bunny face and two simple slices in a second cake create the ears and a bow tie. You then frost, cover the imperfections with coconut (that’s what I do), and decorate with goodies.

Bunny cake diagram

This is the diagram from the old magazine clipping.

Bunny cake diagram


Mom used to frost the cake with boiled icing which looks lovely and bunny-like. I haven’t yet learned to make boiled frosting so use a simple white frosting instead. You’ll need a good 4 cups of icing to ice the cake.

Make your bunny cake with this molasses devil’s food cake

Easy creamy icing

1/4 cup soft butter

3 Tbsp milk

1 tsp vanilla

3-4 cups of icing sugar

Cream the butter with the milk and vanilla. Add the icing sugar one cup at a time until you get a spreadable consistency.

**You’ll need to double the recipe to fully frost a layer cake.

Related reading

‘Pet De Soeurs’ or Nun’s Pastries

“Get it On” — Banging Cookies Recipe–This Will Feel Wrong, but Trust Me!

The Invincible Ginger Snap Cookies of Carleton Place

Memories of Woolworths and Chicken in a Van

Slow Cooker Boston Baked Beans–Lanark County Recipes

Easy Christmas Cake- Lanark County Recipes

Holiday Popcorn– Lanark County Recipes

Granny’s Maple Fudge —Lanark County Recipes

Albert Street Canasta Club Chilled Pineapple Dessert

Recipes from Lanark County–Glazed Cranberry Lemon Loaf

Gum Drop Cake — Lanark County Holiday Recipe

Gluten Free–

Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Pastry Chef Ben White

“Sex in the Pan” Memories – A RIP Fashion Violation Photo Essay

Katherine Hepburn Did Eat Brownies

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s