Personal Memories of Downtown Local Business etc.

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Ray PaquetteI’m having a senior moment. Will somebody reminding me who ran Moore’s Taxi please?

Linda Gallipeau-Johnston Ernie Moore – I think.

Ray PaquetteWas that the same Ernie Moore who ran the store on Moore Street?

Nancy HudsonLinda I think the taxi driver’s name was John Moore, Ernie had the store on Moore St.

Ray PaquetteNancy Hudson I remember Watty Stanzel, Arnie McNeely, Ronnie Wing and Wib Giles but John Moore, I have no recollection of. Where did he live?

Nancy HudsonRay Paquette John Moore lived at the corner of Town Line west and Moffatt St. My Aunt and Uncle, Les and Olive Nield lived next door to him on Moffatt St

Ray PaquetteLinda Gallipeau-Johnston Ted has taken on the affectation of 2 “d’s” in his name. He is now known as Tedd. Go figure?!?!?

Ray PaquetteLinda Gallipeau-Johnston You were asking about Tedd. Here is a picture of him and Brian McDonald taken last September. Ted is on the right….

Doug B. McCartenRay Paquette great to see Brian and Tedd are well and enjoying life as retirees! Ask Brian if he remembers the two young ladies who were traveling through town selling magazine subscriptions? We all went back to Brian’s house to discuss our choices….. lol! I actually got a subscription for Car & Driver….. I think Brian took one of the ladies to his room to get money or something BAHAHAHA what a nice visit we had with them…….

Ray PaquetteDoug B. McCarten I sent your comment regarding the magazine sales staff to Brian who commented “…You can tell Doug that , although that little experience had slipped my mind, yes I do remember now that he mentioned it. I thought that there might have been a third guy involved but I might be wrong. I ended up getting a subscription for a year to a magazine I cared little for.Those girls were VERY good at their job.”

Ray PaquetteThere are a lot of commercial locations of earlier times that are not included on this “place mat”. Bellamy’s Restaurant, Sinclair Bros. Men’s Wear and Patterson’s Furniture to mention a few others not already noted above. I could go on but would bore most readers…

Joan StoddartRemember the rest rooms beside the Queen’s

Ray PaquetteBeginning at the bottom of Bridge Street, on the west side: the Texaco station, the Salvation Army Citadel, Levines, Hick’s Grocery, Charlie Jay Shoe Repair, Mae Mulvey’s Candy Shop. Central Grill, Galvin’s Men’s Wear, Carleton Grill ( and the Colonial Bus Lines stop), the Roxy Theatre, Harold Dowdall’s Barbersop, Denny Coyles Esso, Ned Root’s Shoe Repair, Stanzel’s Taxi, Dr. McDowell, Darou’s Bakery. Doucette Insurance, McAllister’s Bike Repair, Oona’s Applicances/Bob Flint TV, Hastie Bros Plumbing, Bruce McDonald Optometrist, Foote Photography, the public restrooms, the Queens Hotel, Woodcock’s Bakery, Lewis Reg’d Ladies Wear, Okilman’s, and Patterson’s Furniture. I probably forgot a business but I’m sure other readers can “fill in the blanks” or take exception to some of the names on the list. More to come when I crossover to the East side of bridge…😂

Joann VoyceRay/ Not Lewis but Moskivitch Dress shop. Lewis was beside Comba I believe as my mother sent me there for clothes

Ray PaquetteTwo days ago I listed the businesses of my boyhood that operated on the west side of Bridge, a.k.a., Main Street. Today I’ll bore you with reminisces of the east side, with the caveat that I may omit or misidentify a business or two, but cut me some slack, this was 70 years ago! Beginning at the Mississippi Hotel, there was Joie Bond’s store, her brother’s barber shop, Bowland’s Grocery, Carleton Cleaners, William’s Drugstore, Fulton’s Furniture, predecessor to Allan Barker, Kiddy Town, Playfair Bowling Lanes, The Canadian, the Liquor Store. Then Dr Ferrill’s office, the Orange Lodge, the Canadian Tire, the Post Office, the Bank of Nova Scotia, Dr. McCarron the dentist, Royal Bank, New York Cafe, the Olympia, Howard Little’s Barber shop, Argue’s Grocery, Robertson’s Men’s Wear, Wilson’s Drugstore, Dack’s Jewellers, McCann’s Poolroom, the Dominion Store. Across Franklin Street there was Asseltine’s Drugstore, Stedman’s 5 & 10, Walkers Dry Goods, Allan’s Shoe Store, Dr Walroth’s Office and Mr. Tighe, the Piano Teacher, McLaren’s Drugstore, Lewis Reg’d, and Comba’s Furniture. On the north side of the bridge, was Dr. Johnston’s office and Branch #192, Royal Canadian Legion. Bennett’s Meat Market on the corner of Bell Street, McArten’s Insurance, Brewers Retail, the Maple Leaf Dairy, and finally, the (Cameron’s?) Blacksmith Shop across from Miller’s Farm Equipment. Anyway, that’s what I remember: perhaps some of the readers would like to fill in the blanks that I have left, not intentionally.

Ray PaquetteDan Williams Read my follow on note in reply to Doug’s question about me taking notes. It easy when you are in and out of those businesses 6 days a week delivering a paper…😂

I loved what Susan Mary Risk posted in December 2019 so I added it.

Susan Mary Risk–We had milk and fruit juice delivered to the front door daily. It’s because no one had refrigerators. We kept everything in the larder, the weeks rationed roast under a fly net.It turned green iridescent and we still ate it. We had beef drippings on bread for a treat, not Cheesies or fruit loops. In winter we had to break ice off the toilet water and ruffle the frost off the toilet seat. What we had for heating two stories was a coal or coke burning fireplace and one tiny gas space heater in the nursery that Mom payed for by sticking a shilling into the meter placed in the hall. This was post war England.

Ah the good old days, when I was allowed to spray the flowers with a hand pump, full of good old DDT. No one admonished us with threats of lymphoma back then. No one told me I could get skin or lung cancer by fetching the coal from a small shed with a galvanized steel bucket. Though heavy, this was a less noxious material than today’s plastics. Stuffies, now. I kept my bear, David, until I was 13. I had one bear. My sister still had her stuffie, Ellie a few years before she died at age 60. Our stuffie were filled with sawdust. She found that out eventually.

We never had freezing on our teeth at the dentist. Instead, the dentist would promise us we could hold and look at a gold painted wooden angel if we didn’t scream from the drilling. The good old days when responsibility meant staying on the sidewalk all night in winter to protest apartheid outside the US Embassy in Toronto. Ages 12 and 14. Those days of witness, the violent deaths of blacks or protesters in the South. Police brutality. The deaths of Martin Luther King, of Robert Kennedy, the incarceration of Nelson Mandela.Life was more carefree before TV and perhaps we older folk dream of our youth as blessed at times, but somehow I feel our children have so much more than we ever knew.

relatedreading

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 1– Canadian Tire to The Moose

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 2- Milano Pizza to Milady Dress Shop

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 3- St. Andrew’s to Central School

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 5-The Little White House to the Roxy

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 6-The Eating Place to the Post Office

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 7 –Scotia Bank to the New York Cafe

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 8–Olympia Restaurant to McNeely’s–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 10–

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 11

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12Dr. Johnson Downing and Ferril I Presume? Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 12 a

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign–Dr. Winters 154-160 Bridge Street Carleton Place –Jaan Kolk Files

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 14

Mitchell & Cram — History of The Summit Store 1898-1902 –Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 15

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series–Volume 16– Newman’s Hall

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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