Leslie China Hall Fire

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Leslie China Hall Fire
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he Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
24 Sep 1913, Wed  •  Page 1

This building started out as Leslie’s China Store operated by Mrs. Leslie circa 1890.  There was a fire in 1913 and later R.R. Powell operated a grocery at this site. I finally found the clipping about the fire which happened in September of 1913. The first of two Powell Grocery locations opened and  chose the Leslie Building, next to Comba’s furniture store.

Mr. Powell was the Sunday School Superintendent and he had three main interests in life: his business, his family, and the Methodist Church (Zion Memorial), which he attended regularly and was a lay preacher. It was a family run store and each helped in the store and he also employed Roy Whyte of Lake Ave East as a delivery boy. The oldest girl was Gladys. (Mrs. John Lashley and her sister Olive was a very popular CPHS teacher) Fern worked as a civil servant and Bert went to college and never returned to Carleton Place. Read more at:  Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 4- Leslie’s China Shop to Rubino’s/Giant Tiger

Mr. Powell was the Sunday School Superintendent and he had three main interests in life: his business, his family, and the Methodist Church (Zion Memorial), which he attended regularly and was a lay preacher. It was a family run store and each helped in the store and he also employed Roy Whyte of Lake Ave East as a delivery boy. The oldest girl was Gladys. (Mrs. John Lashley and her sister Olive was a very popular CPHS teacher) Fern worked as a civil servant and Bert went to college and never returned to Carleton Place.

McRostie’s store– Photo Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum
 

A china hall was quite popular and McRostie’s–The grocery store of Bowland and McRostie was located at 215 Bridge Street had one too. It usually comprised of dishware and other things From figurines to cups and saucers, porcelain was an important part of entertaining.

“A large table is spread with a white cloth with fine china; at one end is a tea service with a kettle of water boiling over an alcohol lamp, while at the other end is a service for chocolate. There should be flowers on the table and dishes containing bread and butter cut as thin as a shaving.”

“Thin slices of bread and butter, sandwiches, fancy biscuit or cake, tea, coffee, or chocolate, ice-cream, and bouillon are offered. Punch and lemonade—but no wine of any kind—may be added if desired; and also salted almonds, cakes, candies, and other dainty trifles.”

The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
10 Dec 1919, Wed  •  Page 3

Update on Miss Powell from CPHS- John Edwards

Glory Days of Carleton Place- Dear Miss Powell by Terry Kirkpatrick

Glory Days in Carleton Place-Sherri Iona (Lashley)

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series –Volume 13

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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