Brice McNeely, a Tannery and Eggs Benedict

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Brice McNeely, a Tannery and Eggs Benedict
The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
17 Jun 1989, Sat  •  Page 109

Here in Carleton Place can park their cars and eat great food, including breakfast, beside the Mississippi River. The building was constructed in 1861, although a tannery was first operated on the site in 1852.

Joe Scott took a poor calf skin to Brice McNeely who had a tannery on the banks of the Mississippi on Bell Street and asked what he was paying for hides. Brice told him 60 cents each with ten cents off for every hole in the hide.

You’d better take it, Mr. McNeely, and I think I owe you something for it,” was the startled reply from J. Scott as Brice looked at the hide with more holes than Swiss Cheese.

Carleton Place Herald 1900

Farmers may have driven their animals to Carleton Place, where John Murdoch’s tannery at “Morphy’s Ford” turned hides into leather. It’s now The Gastro Pub, still with the beautiful patio.

Brice McNeely bought the business in 1860 and left the building to his son, who turned it into a summer home at the turn of the century. It first became a restaurant in 1981, and a dining lounge was built from a local log barn. The lounge is named “Henry’s” after a friendly ghost who’s rumoured to haunt the premises. Now it is called The Waterfront Gastro Pub

12 Bell Street (0.08 mi)
Carleton Place, ON, Canada K7C 1V9-(613) 257-5755

Read more about the history of Brice McNeely here:

You Would Never Find Warm Leatherette at the Local Carleton Place Tannery

The Moore Legacy — Frances Moore — Genealogy

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 3

The McNeely Family Saga– Part 1 and 2

The Carleton Place House with the Coffin Door

“This day twenty years ago I came to Carleton Place, near the close of the Civil War.  At that time property was of little value.  I took charge of the railway station as station master.  The only industries in the place were the grist mill, run by Mr. Bolton, Allan McDonald’s carding mill, Brice McNeely’s tannery and the saw mill run by Robert Gray, with one circular saw.  David Findlay’s foundry was just starting.

The lead mines were about closing down then.  Twenty years ago it may be said there was no such thing as employment here for anyone and, strange as it seems, no one seemed to wish for work.  Their wants were few, and those wants seemed to be soon supplied.–George Lowe, a seventy year old resident of Carleton Place: (July 1884)

Ad from Carleton Place newspaper 1873 from .. Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum

Brice McNeely’s tannery is one of the oldest in this part of the country. The proprietor manufactures leather of various kinds and is one of our substantial steady and increasingly prosperous men, with considerable real estate. John F. Cram, whose large wool-pulling establishment is well known in this section, manipulates a vast amount of sheep pelts in a year, his premises being one of the most extensive in Eastern Ontario. He also manufactures russet leather.

Did you know the library used to be in the town hall and Brice McNeely Jr was not only the superintendent for the St James Sunday School but also the town librarian. He picked out the books for you to read and you had no choice in the matter and had to take what was given to you.

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
25 Feb 1896, Tue  •  Page 5
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
04 Jul 1903, Sat  •  Page 6
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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
26 Dec 1942, Sat  •  Page 12

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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