The Foster Brick Found in the Mississippi River –Tracy Thompson Wells

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Tracy Thompson Wells

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Last month while I was diving with the boys I saw this brick but couldn’t get it. The boys found it today. I bet there is a story there somewhere. Tracy Thompson Wells It was at the bottom of the river behind my house. I found it diving last month, but couldn’t bring it up. The boys grabbed it today. 🙂
Tracy Thompson Wells Hard to say. Some of the older houses used to put their family names on the foundations of their houses. It will be interesting to find out.

So all day I researched Fosters in Carleton Place, and let me tell you it was not a common name in our fair town. If you look closely at the letters on that brick they were definitely done by a blacksmith but a brick at the bottom of a river bed could have come from anywhere. However I found an odd story from January of 1909 about a man named Foster and Carleton Place and thought it should be documented along with Tracy’s brick.

Between 8 and 9 pm on January 11, 1909 Mr. William Foster aged about sixty-five, was found dead in the small frame building on Victoria Street where he had been living alone for some time. The deceased had not been seen outside since Monday morning, and the coroner figured he had died sometime on Tuesday. He was found completely clothed except that he had removed his overcoat and he was found stretched upon the floor.

For over twenty year ago Mr. Foster kept a livery stable and then became an agricultural implement agent. During the past few years he was engaged in hiring men for the lumber camps. The deceased was a quiet, sober, inoffensive man and it is with a deep, sense of regret that he should have died under such sad conditions. Relatives have been notified, and until their arrival the body-will remain in Patterson’s Morgue, who was removed shortly after discovery.

Of course the brick above does not come from this man, but because there were few Foster’s in Carleton Place the tale needed to be told and Mr. Foster needed to be remembered. If you have any idea about this brick give a shoutout to Tracy.

What have you found in the river??? This was found in the Mississippi too-The Dacks and the Mysterious Old Anchor–Sept 6 1968— Almonte Gazette

A relic of the Mississippi river’s interesting past was reclaimed from the waters recently by Kathy and Keith Dack. The two were diving in the river opposite the former Hawthorne Woollen Mills, now Leigh Instruments, when this discovered a ship’s anchor, well over three feet in length and of tremendous weight.Does anyone know anything about this?https://lindaseccaspina.wordpress.com/2017/06/05/the-dacks-and-the-mysterious-old-anchor/

Devlins and Alexander Lang were blacksmiths 1869 in Carleton Place

1898 Almonte Gazette –They were those of Duncan Cameron, Richard Dowdall, Robert Kenny, McGregor Bros. (Forbes and Neil), and James Warren & Son, all of Carleton Place 

1846 smiths Canadian gazetter

“In 1881 and 1882 charcoal was made by Sandy Hunter, a blacksmith in Carleton Place, first for his own use in his blacksmith shop to shrink the wagon tires on the wood felloes of the large six foot wheels of the dump carts used by the Boyd Caldwell and Peter McLaren lumber firms.  His sons Alex and Lorenzo Hunter followed in their father’s footsteps and continued this enterprise from a commercial standpoint for some time.

So I will keep looking for the owner of the brick, but if Tracy had not found it we would not have documented the story of William Foster and how he died alone. Everyone needs to be remembered.

UPDATES

K P—–I would like to make a suggestion. If possible, send the boys back down to the spot and see if there are more bricks with the name Foster on them. If there are, then I would say Foster was the name of the brick maker. I have investigated bricks in the past and when I do I use the website Scottish Brickmarks website at scottishbrickhistory.co.uk In Perth Ont., and places as far away as northern Quebec, I have found bricks that have come all the way from Scotland in the 1800s!

Adin Wesley Daigle Foster was a manufacturer of bricks from England- Linda Seccaspina apparently they would load the ships with bricks on empty trips across the big pond?

No photo description available.
No photo description available.

William Foster

Ontario Deaths, 1869-1937 and Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947

   

Name:William Foster • Edit
Event Type:Death
Event Date:11 Jan 1909 • Edit
Event Place:Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario • Edit
Gender:Male
Age:68
Age:68
Marital Status:Widowed
Ethnicity:Unknown
Race:Unknown
Race:Unknown
Race:U
Occupation:Agent
Occupation:agent
Birth Year (Estimated):1841
Death Place:Carleton Place, Lanark, Ontario
Death Age:68 years
Father’s Name:William Foster • Edit
Father’s Birthplace:England
Mother’s Name:Ann Wilton • Edit
Mother’s Birthplace:Huntley
Record Number:178

Tales of the Rivermen

Perth Flood 1930s Tay River

What if Locks Had Been on the Mississippi River?

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

One response »

  1. I would like to make a suggestion. If possible, send the boys back down to the spot and see if there are more bricks with the name Foster on them. If there are, then I would say Foster was the name of the brick maker. I have investigated bricks in the past and when I do I use the website Scottish Brickmarks website at scottishbrickhistory.co.uk In Perth Ont., and places as far away as northern Quebec, I have found bricks that have come all the way from Scotland in the 1800s!

    Like

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