Dr. Metcalfe Guthrie Evoy

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Dr. Metcalfe Guthrie Evoy

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Dr. Metcalfe, who established his practice in Almonte years ago broke into the political forum in 1901.  It had been his four-year battle feud subsequent victory at the polls to achieve public ownership of hydro electric power that had turned Dr. Metcalfe’s thoughts to running for public office. He believed that his idea to consolidate all powers in Almonte on a plan where the Mississippi River’s total supply could be regulated for 24 hours per day would one day become a reality. This plan would be beneficial to Carleton Place, Appleton, Rosebank, Pakenham, Galetta. and all the falls on the Mississippi and increase the efficiency of the stored lakes

Dr. Metcalfe was mayor of Almonte from 1917 to 1919 and in 1924 and in 1929. During his terms as mayor, the streets of Almonte were paved. It took a fight in the courts before the doctor got action on adequate accommodation for high school pupils. The high school had been a building rented from the Almonte Public School Board. Through Dr. Metcalfe’s efforts the building was renovated and a gymnasium erected. The gym, he admits was his pet project, since he had always been keenly interested in  sports.

Also a great horse lover, the doctor was active in sulky racing. Dr. Metcalfe’s entries won many red ribbons at Ottawa and Toronto exhibitions as well as at local and district Fall fairs. Through the years, medicine and politics with Dr. Metcalfe walked hand in hand. He used to travel to outlying rural farmhouses on sick calls by horse. With the aid of two nurses and a flashlight he performed appendix operations on kitchen tables. The doctor helped bring more than 5,000 babies into the world. His assistant was Miss Isabel Guthrie, a niece, who was a registered nurse in Scotland and Canada.

 

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The Ottawa Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
22 Jul 1978, Sat  •  Page 62

 

The last of a family of 12, Dr. Metcalfe was born November, 1869, on the homestead on the 8th Line of Ramsay. His parents, the late Hugh Metcalfe and Jean McLean named him Albert after Prince Albert who had stopped at their home for a drink of water shortly before the baby was born. (1860–Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, undertook a two-month tour of Upper and Lower Canada).For two years after he left high school, he taught at McDonald’s Comers, then, went to Queen’s, where he graduated with honours. He took post graduate work at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and then came to Almonte to set up his practice. He married the former Isabel Mitchell McCallum of St. Andrew’s, Scotland and she died in 1937.

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Feb 1957, Sat  •  Page 49

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historicalnotes

 

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The Ottawa Journal
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
16 Feb 1957, Sat  •  Page 49

 

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`1956

 

 

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Feb 1 1962

 

relatedreading

The Doctors of Almonte … In the First Half of the Century – Archibald Albert Metcalfe

Outstanding Men — Dr. Metcalfe of Almonte

Dr. Archibald Albert “Archie” Metcalfe — The Man with the Red Toupee – John Morrow

  1. Memories of Dr. A. A. Metcalfe of Almonte– Florence Watt

  2. Will the Real Dr. Metcalfe Please Stand Up? Rare Photo Found!!

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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