Unknown History — When the Balcony Fell

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Unknown History — When the Balcony Fell

1894FairPhoto

1894-10 years after the accident.

They had another accident previous to the 1884 one also.. but this is the one that I had not found documented from 1884.

 

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Buffalo Evening News
Buffalo, New York
04 Oct 1884, Sat  •  Page 1

 

 

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CLIPPED FROM

The Gazette
Montreal, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
04 Oct 1884, Sat  •  Page 1

Much as I searched on the Almonte Gazette site I could not find this story and I have understanding of why. This was pretty major.

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Detroit Free Press
Detroit, Michigan
04 Oct 1884, Sat  •  Page 2

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05 Oct 1884, Sun  •  Page 1

 

One of the injured:

Miss Elmsley, it should be noted could read and write. On the 1891 census she was 18 years old, so she was 11 when the accident happened. She went on to become a weaver in one of the Almonte mills. Her mother Mary who became widowed at a young age also worked in the Almonte mills She had two brothers Edward and William and they had an older woman live with them named Routh Pearson who probably helped look after the family. Staunch Methodist family.

historicalnotes

 

The first agricultural hall and drill shed was built in 1865 for this was the time of the Fenian Raids. In 1868 the roof fell in from the great weight of snow so the present agricultural hall had to be built the next year. There was no mention of this accident at all. CLICK

 

Photo above is after the accident in 1884 in the year 1894. Here are some moments from the 1894 fair.

 

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Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
11 Oct 1894, Thu  •  Page 8

 - Ottawa Daily Citizen
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
27 Sep 1894, Thu  •  Page 3

 

Did you know the Almonte Fair Began in Carleton Place? CLICK here.

 

relatedreading

The Lanark Fair 1904 Names Names Names

“Around the Local Fairs in 80 Days”? Lanark County Minor Steampunk Story

The Country Fairs 1879

 

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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