Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

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Twenty Five Cents a  Plate at Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery

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Mrs. Laurie’s Bakery and Confectionery 3 storey white brick building was erected in 1886 on Gore Street in Perth. Baking and candy making were done in the basement where the bake ovens were. Next to store was a neat restaurant in which oysters, ice cream and fruit were served with bread, cakes and pastry along with maybe a bottle of Ginger Beer. She began her business in 1858 and was operated by Jane Laurie and her daughter Margaret McCormack. Her daughter died in 1925 and Jane sold the business in 1925 and died the same year at age 90. In 1975 the Laurie store was combined with the adjoining store in the Drennan Block and Stedman’s took over that location.

 

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In 1876 on Dominion Day 500 hundred strong of the Queen’s Army were coming to Perth but not one of the 8 hotels in Perth would undertake the task. The only condition was that the councillors would provide the tables, Shaw’s of Perth would supply the linen tables and Arthur Meigan and Brothers all the dishware,

Local ladies made the potatoes, Jane Laurie baked and sliced 125 loaves of bread, boiled beef and ham, and buns were baked along with 125 pies. On top of this came dozens and dozens  of Mrs. Laurie’s fried cakes. The soldiers arrived at noon and had a massive feast. Jane Laurie had pulled it off– for 25 cents a plate and leaving her a tidy profit of $62.25.

 

Mrs. James Lawrie and Her Ginger Beer

 

relatedreading

Wondrous! The Woodcock Bakery

Cake By the Mississippi — The Bowland Bakery

Lorne Hart– The Old Towne Bakery — A Recipe is Just a Recipe

Roy Woodcock Photo -Woodcock’s Bakery

Before there was Baker Bob’s There was The Almonte Bakery

Bill Jenkins- Riverman and Wedding Cake Maker?

Remembering the Smells of Heaven on Earth —Davidson’s Bakery

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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