Tales from the Old Mill Appleton Morrow Collie

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Tales from the Old Mill Appleton Morrow Collie

 

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Credits:
North Lanark Regional Museum (2012.13.33)
Donated by Edna Lowry

 

In December of 1945 William Morrow, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Morrow of Almonte, lost all the fingers on his left hand as a result of an accident in the Collie woollen mill at Appleton on Wednesday.

He was employed in the carding room, and in some way caught his hand in the machine. He was removed to the Rosamond Memorial hospital, Almonte, where Dr. C. R. I MacDowall, of Carleton Place, found it necessary to amputate four fingers. He is 20 years of age and was recently discharged from the army.

John Morrow added-

The William Morrow referred to in the first part of this post is my father. There are three errors of fact in this brief report: 1. he did not quite lose all four fingers on his left hand; he still had a stump–one joint–of the index finger; 2. he was 19 years old at the time; the accident happened on December 12, 1945, and he was born August 2, 1926; and 3. he told me he was officially still in the army, but out on “Labour Leave” at the time. He said he was not formally discharged until sometime in the spring of 1946. The report in the Almonte Gazette (sometimes facetiously called the “Gasbag”) had an additional error by saying he was the oldest son rather than the middle son (he also had ten sisters).

 

November 28,1961-– Support is mounting here under the leadership of a grateful father for authorities to award a medal to Mrs. James Collie of Appleton who rescued his nine-year-old son from the icy waters of the Mississippi River Nov. 20.

Yesterday, Town Police referred the medal application to the Canadian Red Cross Society. The rescue made in total darkness was revealed for the first time yesterday. Mrs. Collie was walking near the Old Mill Dam at Appleton when she heard cries for help. She ran out along the dam towards the cries and found Tony Command, a neighbour, floundering in the water.

Lying on her stomach, she managed with a great effort to hold out the limb of a tree to the boy, and told him to hang on. “At first Tony said he couldn’t hold on, but I got firm with him and finally he grabbed on,” she said. Meanwhile she sent Donald Dalgity, 12, who was also present, to her home for help.

He came back with William Collie, 68-year-old father-in-law of Mrs. Collie, and together they pulled the boy in to the safety of the dam. After receiving first-aid treatment for facial lacerations caused by the sharp ice, Tony made a full recovery. He got into his near-fatal predicament when on his way to visit a neighbour, he stopped off at the dam to throw sticks into the water. In the darkness he lost his balance and fell in. Tom Command, the boy’s father, is most anxious that the courage of his neighbour, Mrs. Collie, be recognized.

 

North Lanark Regional Museum (2012.55.145.5)
Donated by Sheila Babb and Ann E. Love

 

 

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The Appleton Incident 1954

Tom Edwards Appleton Photos 1910-1920

The Story of the Appleton Sleigh Ride–Audrey Syme

Appleton Notes– Who Do you Know?– Names Names Names

The Bryson Craig Farm in Appleton

“They Didn’t Fit My Dinner”—Letters from Hilda-Maberly and Appleton– – Doug B. McCarten

Where was Bay View House in Appleton?

You Never Talk About Appleton

Suspended Teacher —Appleton School 1931 — Miss Annie Neilson

Local News and Farming–More Letters from Appleton 1921-Amy and George Buchanan-Doug B. McCarten

The Letters of John Buchanan and Mary Ilan–Appleton– from Doug McCarten

Why the Appleton Bridge Collapsed…

The Day the Appleton Bridge Collapsed

Lawsuits in Carleton Place — The Collapse of the Appleton Bridge

Poutine Curds From the Appleton Cheese Factory?

The Appleton General Store and Polly Parrot

The Insane Spinster Ghost of Appleton Ontario

The Abandoned Appleton Mill

Unravelled: Appleton textile mill

The Abandoned Appleton Mill

Unravelled: Appleton textile mill

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

3 responses »

  1. The William Morrow referred to in the first part of this post is my father. There are three errors of fact in this brief report: 1. he did not quite lose all four fingers on his left hand; he still had a stump–one joint–of the index finger; 2. he was 19 years old at the time; the accident happened on December 12, 1945, and he was born August 2, 1926; and 3. he told me he was officially still in the army, but out on “Labour Leave” at the time. He said he was not formally discharged until sometime in the spring of 1946. The report in the Almonte Gazette (sometimes facetiously called the “Gasbag”) had an additional error by saying he was the oldest son rather than the middle son (he also had ten sisters).

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