Even if it’s Convenient — You Can’t Marry Your Sister in law

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Even if it’s Convenient — You Can’t Marry Your Sister in law

ExpSetBackInTheUSSROl-khovikFamily768x511.jpg

 

Brother Marries Sister, Augusta Chronicle newspaper article 8 August 1926

 

The British North America Act split up jurisdiction over marriage in Canada: The federal government was handed control over marriage and divorce, while provinces were left to handle ceremonies as well as marital property rights, post divorce and remarriage. Officials were wary of the situation playing out in the United States, where marriage and divorce were left entirely up to individual states, resulting in a piecemeal system that allowed bickering couples to cross state lines in pursuit of quickie splits. After Confederation, Canadian newspapers would often set this country apart from the United States by invoking the “morality” of Canadian families, mocking the lax divorce laws of our supposedly more promiscuous neighbours to the south.

 

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Clipped from

  1. The Leader-Post,
  2. 11 Aug 1919, Mon,
  3. Page 14

 

“People moved in smaller circles in those days and the range of marriage partners was less extensive,” legal historian Philip Girard said, explaining why a man might want to marry his dead wife’s sister. “Many people thought that this was actually the ideal situation: The deceased wife’s sister would be familiar with the family and she’d already be an aunt of the children.” But it was a touchy idea both for Anglican lawmakers, who considered the setup incestuous, and proto-feminists, who feared it might “complicate and sexualize family relationships, that even when his wife was alive, the husband might already be looking at the sister as a potential replacement,” Girard said. Nonetheless, a Quebec MP appealed to have the laws reformed and, in 1882, husbands whose wives had died were permitted to wed their wives’ sisters. Not surprisingly, the prospect of women marrying their deceased husbands’ brothers was a bridge too far: That remained illegal until 1923.

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Clipped from

  1. The Ottawa Citizen,
  2. 30 Apr 1920, Fri,
  3. Page 10

 

 

 

historicalnotes

 

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Clipped from

  1. Ottawa Daily Citizen,
  2. 15 Mar 1882, Wed,
  3. Page 3

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

  1. Sixteen Wives– What Do You Get? Another Day Older and Deeper in Debt

  2. I’m so Sick of that Same Old Love — Bigamous Relations in Lanark County

    James Watson– Bigamy and Shoes

    A Smith’s Falls “Frustrated Young Love’s Dream” Purdy vs Lenahan

    She Came Back! A Ghost Divorce Story

    One Night in Almonte or Was it Carleton Place?

    Bigamists? How About the Much Married Woman? One for the Murdoch Mystery Files

  3. The Wedding of Stanley Alexander Jackson and Margaret Elizabeth Forbes

    The Thomas Alfred Code Journal – Letters-Part 15- Code Family– Love and Runaway Marriages

    Odd Ironic Wedding Stories –Or it was Almost Lonely Valley

    Marriage Records Lanark County, Ontario, Canada– Names Names Names

    Till Death Do Us Part in Lanark County?

    Taming of the Beckwith Shrew?

    A Smith’s Falls “Frustrated Young Love’s Dream” Purdy vs Lenahan

    Going to the Chapel? Hold on– Not so Fast!

    Another Episode in Spinsterdom–The Armour Sisters of Perth

    She Came Back! A Ghost Divorce Story

    Slander You Say in Hopetown? Divorce in Rosetta?

    Go Ask Alice – The Saga of a Personal Ad Divorce

     

    Bigamy–The Story of Ken and Anne and Debby and Cathy and…

“Sale” Fairs — Crops and Sometimes Fair Damsels

About lindaseccaspina

Linda Knight Seccaspina was born in Cowansville, Quebec about the same time as the wheel was invented and the first time she realized she could tell a tale was when she got caught passing her smutty stories around in Grade 7 at CHS by Mrs. Blinn. When Derek "Wheels" Wheeler from Degrassi Jr. High died in 2010, Linda wrote her own obituary. Some people said she should think about a career in writing obituaries. Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa from 1976-1996. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off she finally found her calling. Is it sex drugs and rock n' roll you might ask? No, it is history. Seeing that her very first boyfriend in Grade 5 (who she won a Twist contest with in the 60s) is the head of the Brome Misissiquoi Historical Society and also specializes in local history back in Quebec, she finds that quite funny. She writes every single day and is also a columnist for Hometown News and Screamin's Mamas. She is a volunteer for the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum, an admin for the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page, and a local guest speaker. She has been now labelled an historian by the locals which in her mind is wrong. You see she will never be like the iconic local Lanark County historian Howard Morton Brown, nor like famed local writer Mary Cook. She proudly calls herself The National Enquirer Historical writer of Lanark County, and that she can live with. Linda has been called the most stubborn woman in Lanark County, and has requested her ashes to be distributed in any Casino parking lot as close to any Wheel of Fortune machine as you can get. But since she wrote her obituary, most people assume she's already dead. Linda has published six books, "Menopausal Woman From the Corn," "Cowansville High Misremembered," "Naked Yoga, Twinkies and Celebrities," "Cancer Calls Collect," "The Tilted Kilt-Vintage Whispers of Carleton Place," and "Flashbacks of Little Miss Flash Cadilac." All are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Linda's books are for sale on Amazon or at Wisteria · 62 Bridge Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada, and at the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum · 267 Edmund Street · Carleton Place, Ottawa, Canada--Appleton Museum-Mississippi Textile Mill and Mill Street Books and Heritage House Museum and The Artists Loft in Smith Falls.

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