Stories from Flint’s Store — Bill Slade

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Stories from Flint’s Store — Bill Slade

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Stories from Bill Slade — NO, that is not Flint’s delivery truck

 

I bought the old 55” from Flint’s on Bridge Street and It was to replace an older rear projection TV we had in the basement. Part of the deal was Flint was to move the rear projection TV to the garage. Since we had finished the basement, narrow stairs with turns, quite a feat.

So, Flint brings in some help. An older gentleman.  They huff and puff their way to the turn in the stairs and get stuck.  Really stuck!  He was probably thinking about leaving it there but not really an option.  Finally, we get the TV back down to the basement.  Not without some serious dents in the wall!

 

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Photo of one of the first Televisions from Flint’s TV store from the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum.

 

We ended up putting the old rear projection TV in the furnace room for storage.  Flint then proceeded to set up the new TV.  That’s the way Flint operated, customer service.

It sat in the furnace room for a few months until I put it on Kijiji for free!  A young chap indicated he wanted it, told him he had to remove it from my basement.  He showed up with a buddy and they whisked this heavy brut up the stairs and into their truck in one fell swoop.

That’s the difference from buying locally and from a big box store in Kanata. In Kanata you take the TV home and set it up yourself.  Flint installed what he sold and he never added a service charge.  He left when we were satisfied after he gave us a short course on how to use it. Sad when he closed up shop, had bought appliances from him also. If it was a few dollars more, well worth the service and advice.

 

relatedreading

The

Bob Flint’s TV Tips

The Danger Zone —TV Technicians in Carleton Place

Carleton Place Then and Now–Bridge Street Series– Volume 9–Flint’s to the Blue Spot

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

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