Drummond Cemetery Photos by Glenda Mahoney

Standard
Drummond Cemetery Photos by Glenda Mahoney

 

38544001_223776618282668_3541435886874918912_n.jpg

All Photos Glenda Mahoney

On is the of the oldest cemeteries in Drummond is the Old Drummond Centre Cemetery that is situated on land drawn from the crown in 1816 by Donald McDonald and was deeded to him on march 30,1824.

38448986_638542903184903_3806825386428334080_n.jpg
The Drummond Cemetery. We have always called it the Malloch cemetery. It is very old. 4 generations of Mallochs interred in that beautiful spot. The new  monument of the Ross’s was set in place once the site of the lost children was found. They had been buried there before the cemetery was sanctioned ground.

In 1816 at the first site two children were buried in the field, their grave marked by a Hawthorne Tree. Their name was believed to be Ross, as a family by that name squatted there very early and also drew Lot 23 Con. 5 close to the road. At the second site there are at least 2 graves and a third site containing the graves of 3 children is on Lot. 23 Con. 5 close to the road. These were not cemeteries in the official meaning of the word, but the graves of family buried close to home. This was not an uncommon occurrence but there is no doubt there are more such grave sites through the township that have been long forgotten.

 

38515431_2065871920395282_8452737977762709504_n.jpg

38420046_470799976726309_5732323366266732544_n.jpg

When we were children we spent time wandering the cemetery and marvelling at the dates and names. To say we had a reputation as a wild bunch may be true but we were taught from an early age to be very respectful and quiet in the cemetery.

38496374_306853813403632_6981636851962478592_n.jpg

cbcbc

38454722_262823087847086_5119734856602877952_n.jpg

Recently I was at the cemetery just visiting with my nephew Ethan who is 7. We wandered from old stone to old stone while he traced with his little fingers the worn names and dates and I read out to him some of the words we could barely see. We picked wildflowers and distributed them. It made me realize once again how important our past is.  Then we walked back to the Farm and spent the rest of the day with family who were very much alive and very noisy. A perfect day.

 

Come and visit the Lanark County Genealogical Society Facebook page– what’s there? Cool old photos–and lots of things interesting to read. Also check out The Tales of Carleton Place and The Tales of Almonte

relatedreading

The Oldest Cemetery in Drummond

Faeries on the Malloch Farm

 

A Time Capsule on the Malloch Farm

The Malloch Barn and Other Things

The Mahoney Legacy Ends–Masonry Runs in the Blood

About lindaseccaspina

Before she laid her fingers to a keyboard, Linda was a fashion designer, and then owned the eclectic store Flash Cadilac and Savannah Devilles in Ottawa on Rideau Street from 1976-1996. She also did clothing for various media and worked on “You Can’t do that on Television”. After writing for years about things that she cared about or pissed her off on American media she finally found her calling. She is a weekly columnist for the Sherbrooke Record and documents history every single day and has over 6500 blogs about Lanark County and Ottawa and an enormous weekly readership. Linda has published six books and is in her 4th year as a town councillor for Carleton Place. She believes in community and promoting business owners because she believes she can, so she does.

One response »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s